Contrary To Misinformation, COVID-19 Mortality And Hospitalization Has Been Rising In The Last 30 Days Globally. Please Take Precautions!

BREAKING NEWS
News
Latests Medical News from around the world and also Thailand, bringing you updates, discoveries, studies and findings on various aspects and diseases in the medical world. Most of these articles are not only meant for Doctors In Thailand or Hospitals In Thailand but also for any patients or health conscious individuals wanting to know more.
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 16, 2019  4 years ago
A Study involving the analysis of a large databank of more than 466,039  individuals from a UK biobank by University Of Tulane in New Orleans led by Professor Lu Qi had their findings published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ ).   The findings indicated that glucosamine may have benefits in preventing CVD (Cardiovascular Disease) events, such as stroke and coronary heart disease bu...
Source: Thailand Medical News Exclusive  May 15, 2019  4 years ago
Stop taking daily low dose aspirin as a means to  prevent cardiovascular issues unless your doctor prescribes it, according to new guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA), as it can actually do more harm than good.   "We're talking about healthy people who don't have known heart disease or stroke, who migh...
Source: University Of Sydney  May 14, 2019  4 years ago
Breaking research by University Of Sydney  provides new evidence that nanoparticles in the form of food additives, which are present in many food items, have a substantial and harmful influence on human health and is a factor for many leading gastrointestinal diseases and even neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases.   The study investigated the health impacts of food additive E171 (...
Source: University Of Sydney  May 13, 2019  4 years ago
Scientists have found significant differences in the shape and biology of the same type of cell taken from different parts of the retina, according to a study in eLife. The results could help explain why the macula region of the eye is more susceptible to disease than the peripheral retina and reveals a protective mechanism that may be disrupted in disease.   The macula is a specialise...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 12, 2019  4 years ago
One of the largest of its kind, the study performed an untargeted metabolomics profile of over 1,200 participants  to identify metabolites linked to the hardening of arteries.   Hardening arteries, or arterial stiffness, is an independent risk factor for heart disease and death, and the mechanisms that contribute to arterial stiffening are not well understood.   That's where m...
Source: La Jolla Institute for Immunology, California  May 11, 2019  4 years ago
A new HIV vaccine delivery strategy appears to enhance the protective immune response in a preclinical model. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered that delivering an HIV vaccine in small doses over a series of days leads to a stronger immune response than when the same vaccine is given all at once.   A similar escalating dose method could be the best way...
Source: Harvard Medical School, Boston  May 10, 2019  4 years ago
Statin use may lower the risk for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), according to a study published online May 2 in JAMA Ophthalmology.   High cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of developing glaucoma, but a new study suggests taking statins to lower cholesterol helps to reduce this risk.   Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve, typic...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 09, 2019  4 years ago
First Fertility Group, which comprises of its main clinic in Bangkok located at Rajdamri and also branch clinics in Cambodia and also elsewhere in the region, was recently the recipient of the Fertility Service Provider Of The Year in Asia Pacific by  Global Health and Travel (GHT). The Global Health & Travel Awards recognizes companies that have push boundary of delighting their custo...
Source: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus  May 09, 2019  4 years ago
A mysterious epidemic of chronic kidney disease among agricultural workers and manual laborers may be caused by a combination of increasingly hot temperatures, toxins and infections, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. In recent years, chronic kidney disease has emerged as a major illness among workers in hot climates. It was first identified in the 1...
Source: US FDA  May 08, 2019  4 years ago
If you have type 2 diabetes and are taking a newer class of medications to treat your disease—but one day you notice pain, redness and a foul odor in your genital area.If this happens, new research suggests you need to see your doctor immediately, because you may be suffering from Fournier gangrene. Also known as a "flesh-eating" disease, this infection attacks your genital or anal...
Source: Institute of Cancer Research, UK  May 07, 2019  4 years ago
Scientists have identified a gene mutation in the tumours of men with prostate cancer that is linked to very poor survival—and which could be used to pick out patients for more intensive treatment. Men with mutations in the retinoblastoma gene in their tumours were more than three times as likely to die and nearly seven times as likely to relapse on standard treatments as those without th...
Source: PLOS  May 06, 2019  4 years ago
Paromomysin-based topical treatments were shown to be effective in curing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), according to a randomized, double blind study conducted in Central America and published with PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Leishmaniasis, transmitted by a female phlebotomine sand fly bite, is endemic in 98 countries and has approximately 0.7 to 1.2 million CL cases each year. Infectio...
Source: Karolinska Institutet  May 05, 2019  4 years ago
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified blood-based biomarkers that may determine which patients will benefit from continued hormonal therapy for advanced prostate cancer. The researchers envision that this discovery may eventually result in a test that contributes to a more personalised treatment of the disease. Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer in Sweden. App...
Source: University of Oxford  May 04, 2019  4 years ago
The discovery of a new way to target and treat the leading genetic contributor to Parkinson's may open the way for a potential new clinical treatment. Researchers from Oxford's Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG) have identified how the dysfunction of a key gene, LRRK2, causes the neurons affected in Parkinson's to lose their ability to effectively clear out cell c...
Source: Rice University  May 03, 2019  4 years ago
Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues.   Bioprinting research from the lab of Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller featured a visually stunning proof-of-principle -- a scale-model of a lung-mimicking air sac with airways and blood vessels that never touch yet still provide oxygen to re...
Source: National Institutes of Health,US  May 02, 2019  4 years ago
Taking a folic acid supplement daily before pregnancy may reduce the risk of gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.    Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, or vitamin B9, which is found in leafy green vegetables, nuts, peas, beans and other foods. The U.S. Preventive Services T...
Source: Stanford University Medical Center  Apr 30, 2019  4 years ago
People suffering from a debilitating and often discounted disease known as chronic fatigue syndrome may soon have something they've been seeking for decades: scientific proof of their ailment. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have created a blood test that can flag the disease, which currently lacks a standard, reliable diagnostic test. "Too often, this diseas...
Source: Proceedings froms ESTRO 2019, Milan  Apr 29, 2019  4 years ago
A single high dose of radiation that can be delivered directly to the tumour within a few minutes is a safe and effective technique for treating men with low risk prostate cancer, according to a study presented at the ESTRO 38 conference. Radiotherapy traditionally involves a series of lower dose treatments that take place over several days or week. The new treatment is called high dose-rate br...
Source: Proceedings froms ESTRO 2019, Milan  Apr 28, 2019  4 years ago
For females with hormone-driven breast cancer, adding radiation to hormone therapy might keep their cancer from coming back for up to a decade, a new study finds. Breast cancer didn't come back in the same breast for 97.5% of women who had radiation therapy plus hormone therapy compared to just over 92% of women who had hormone therapy alone, the researchers said. In addition, over the stu...
Source: Uppsala University  Apr 27, 2019  4 years ago
Many diabetes patients do not only have problems with their insulin, but also with the release of the hormone glucagon. Researchers at Uppsala University have now discovered a regulation mechanism which could provide an opportunity to improve blood glucose control in these patients. The hormone glucagon, which is released from alpha cells in the pancreas, plays a vital role in blood glucos...
Source: Thomas Jefferson University  Apr 26, 2019  4 years ago
A new colorectal cancer vaccine showed positive results in the phase 1 clinical trial to demonstrate that the approach is safe. The patients treated had no signs of serious adverse events and samples of their blood contained markers of immune activation—an early indication that the vaccine could activate immune cells to fight colorectal tumors and metastases. Further tests to determine if th...
Source: European Society of Cardiology  Apr 25, 2019  4 years ago
Women who take antibiotics over a long period of time are at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, according to research carried out in nearly 36,500 women.   The study found that women aged 60 or older who took antibiotics for two months or more had the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease, but long duration of antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk if taken ...
Source: American College of Physicians  Apr 24, 2019  4 years ago
In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) clinical trial and its long-term follow-up study, among the persons who lost at least 5 percent of their body weight during the first year, long-term maintenance of weight loss was more likely if they had been assigned to treatment with metformin than with placebo or lifestyle intervention. Being older and losing a greater amount of weight in the first year...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Apr 23, 2019  4 years ago
Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Asia and has dramatically increased the risk of premature death, especially among women and middle-aged people, a multinational study led by Vanderbilt University researchers has found. There is an urgent need to implement diabetes management programs tailored to Asian populations."We found that patients with diabetes are at a substant...
Source: University of Pennsylvania  Apr 22, 2019  4 years ago
Whether a wound -- such as a diabetic foot ulcer -- heals or progresses to a worse outcome, including infection or even amputation, may depend on the microbiome within that wound. A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found specific strains of the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are associated with wounds that do not heal. Researc...
Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center  Apr 21, 2019  4 years ago
About one in seven women in the world will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. The vast majority of these cancers depend on the hormone estrogen to grow. Estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer tumors are frequently treated with the drug tamoxifen, which blocks the hormone's effect on the tumor. However, many tumors eventually become resistant to tamoxifen, allowing cancer to recur o...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Apr 20, 2019  4 years ago
From new toxins to new thoughts on duration of effect to micro injections, the toxin market is growing in dermatology.(exclusive interview with Dr . Michael Gold)   The toxin market is growing for aesthetic indications, and patient interest continues to soar. But in addition to a growing market, Dr. Michael Gold, a leading Dermatologists in the US  says there are other trends to watch....
Source: The Ohio State University  Apr 20, 2019  4 years ago
Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have developed a novel stroke therapy that, when tested in mice and dogs, has proven superior to the standard of care therapy now offered to patients suffering a stroke. "We have shown that our drug, which is completely reversible, opens up a blocked blood vessel better than the...
Source: Oregon Health & Science University  Apr 19, 2019  4 years ago
A scientific breakthrough provides new hope for millions of people living with multiple sclerosis. Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have developed a compound that stimulates repair of the protective sheath that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.   The discovery, involving mice genetically engineered to mimic multiple sclerosis, published in the journal&nbs...
Source: NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,US  Apr 18, 2019  4 years ago
Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, according to a report published online today in The New England Journal of Medicine. Results of the Phase 2, open-label study indicate the antibody, known as UB-42...
Source: University Of Otago  Apr 17, 2019  4 years ago
Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that. Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in...
Source: Stanford Medicine  Apr 16, 2019  4 years ago
A new landmark clinical trial shows that a drug lowers the risk of kidney failure by a third in people with Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. "For the first time in 18 years, we have a therapy for patients with Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease that decreases kidney failure," said Kenneth Mahaffey, MD, professor of medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and co...