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Latests Medical News from around the world and also Thailand, bringing you updates, discoveries, studies and findings on various aspects and diseases in the medical world. Most of these articles are not only meant for Doctors In Thailand or Hospitals In Thailand but also for any patients or health conscious individuals wanting to know more.
Source: University Of Queensland  Mar 09, 2019  3 years ago
New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs).   UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide with about 150 million cases each year, and can lead to serious conditions such as kidney infection and sepsis. A team of cross-instit...
Source: Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America  Mar 08, 2019  3 years ago
Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Clostridioides d...
Source: University of Southern California  Mar 07, 2019  3 years ago
A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say. Researchers emphasize that the study, recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, was in mice, and many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments. Nevertheless, the findings lend credence to...
Source: University of Southern California  Mar 06, 2019  3 years ago
USC researchers provided evidence that a low-calorie "fasting-mimicking" diet has the potential to reduce inflammation and repair the gut. Published in a recent  edition of Cell Reports, the study reports on the health benefits of periodic cycles of the diet for people with inflammation and indicated that the diet reversed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patholo...
Source: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore  Mar 05, 2019  3 years ago
Many Americans take a daily low-dose aspirin to protect their hearts. Now it appears aspirin may also reduce flare-ups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a study of COPD sufferers, researchers found that aspirin was linked to fewer moderate exacerbations, but not severe bouts, of the lung disease. It also reduced moderate and severe episodes of labored breathing. ...
Source: University of Luxembourg  Mar 04, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalised stem cells improve the regeneration of injured or diseased areas in the brain of old mice. The researchers expect that their approach will provide fresh impetus in r...
Source: Tufts University  Mar 03, 2019  3 years ago
The World Cancer Research Fund reports that 30 to 50 percent of cancer cases are preventable, and it is important to focus on stopping cancer from developing in the first place. Many natural foods contain a variety of antioxidants and phytochemicals that possess the capability of preventing cancer from developing coupled with a proper lifestyle. Xiang-Dong Wang, a senior scientist and associate...
Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham  Mar 02, 2019  3 years ago
In a paper recently published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, researchers examined the effect of vaginal tenofovir 1 percent gel use on the risk of acquiring herpes simplex virus type 2, or HSV-2. The study was conducted through a secondary analysis of data from the VOICE study. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one in six Americans ages 14 to 49 ...
Source: University of Pittsburgh  Mar 01, 2019  3 years ago
A single misbehaving protein -- called TDP-43 -- is behind 97 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and 45 percent of frontotemporal dementia diagnoses. It also is found in 80 percent of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and 60 percent of Alzheimer's disease cases. Now, University of Pittsburgh researchers have found a way to trap TDP-43 so it doesn't form toxic clumps that c...
Source: University of Michigan  Feb 28, 2019  3 years ago
A protein molecule called EZH2,  known to play a role in cancer may also be increasing fibrosis in scleroderma patients.   Studies and researches that have been made show that Scleroderma, a rare chronic autoimmune disease, causes difficulties during breathing, exhaustion and most concerningly hardens the internal organs and the skin. “Tissues and organs are damaged due to...
Source: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia  Feb 27, 2019  3 years ago
New preclinical findings from extensive cell and animal studies suggest that a drug already used for a rare kidney disease could benefit patients with some mitochondrial disorders -- complex conditions with severe energy deficiency for which no proven effective treatments exist. Future clinical research is needed to explore whether the drug, cysteamine bitartrate, will meaningfully benefit patient...
Source: Indiana University, US  Feb 26, 2019  3 years ago
A breakthrough test developed by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers to measure pain in patients could help stem the tide of the opioid crisis in Indiana, and throughout the rest of the nation. A study led by psychiatry professor Alexander Niculescu, MD, PhD and published this week in the Nature journal Molecular Psychiatrytracked hundreds of participants at the Richard L. Ro...
Source: University of Virginia Health System  Feb 25, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition. The pr...
Source: Rutgers University  Feb 24, 2019  3 years ago
A Rutgers study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. The study, which was published in the journal Nature Communications, identified the NSD2 gene through a computer algorithm developed to determine which cancergenes that spread in a&nb...
Source: Vanderbilt University  Feb 23, 2019  3 years ago
Verticilide, an extract from the genus of fungus Verticillium, commonly found on plants and insects, is a promising compound to treat arrhythmia according to a research from a collaboration between Vanderbilt University professors of chemistry and medicine. Jeffrey Johnston, Stevenson Professor of Chemistry, said the natural product isn't active except in insects, but the synthetic mirror-i...
Source: University of California - Riverside  Feb 22, 2019  3 years ago
Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. This debilitating condition periodically shutters communication between the brain and other parts of the body, resulting in symptoms that range from numbness and tingling in the arms and legs to blindness and paralysis. While treatments are available to alleviate inflammation, no therapies exist to pro...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 21, 2019  3 years ago
Doctors In Thailand practicing primary care medicine in 2019 have likely met this familiar greeting from a patient: “I Googled my symptoms and I think the problem is [insert condition].” Obviously, this can be unsettling for many providers – doctors in the past were often the first point of reference for patients who otherwise had no way of researching their health concerns on th...
Source: San Diego School Of Medicine  Feb 20, 2019  3 years ago
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which include well-known brand names Prilosec, Miracid, Nexium and Prevacid, are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the world. Approximately 10 percent of adults in the United States take these drugs for frequent heartburn, acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Given their prevalence, researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutic...
Source: University Of Melbourne  Feb 19, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists from the University Of Melbourne said  on Monday that they had discovered immune cells that can fight all known flu viruses in what was hailed as an "extraordinary breakthrough" that could lead to a universal, one-shot vaccine against the killer disease. Influenza epidemics, largely seasonal, kill hundreds of thousands of people each year, according to the World Health ...
Source: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute  Feb 18, 2019  3 years ago
A combination of two drugs -- one of them an immunotherapy agent -- could become a new standard, first-line treatment for patients with metastatic kidney cancer, says an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial. Patients who received the immunotherapy drug avelumab plus axitinib, a targeted agent, had a significant advantage in progression-...
Source: NRG Oncology, Pennsylvania  Feb 17, 2019  3 years ago
The NRG Oncology clinical study NRG-RTOG 0415 determined that a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule (H-RT), a treatment schedule that delivers a total dose of radiotherapy over a shorter period of time, is not worse than the conventional radiotherapy schedule (C-RT) in terms of bowel, bladder, sexual, and general quality of life (QOL) as well as anxiety and depression for men with low risk pros...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 16, 2019  3 years ago
Twelve patients who tried injections of stem cells were hospitalized with infections, according to a report in the New York Times that should cause patients concern. More important is that they should investigate stem cell treatments, for conditions such as cartilage injuries to their joints, before committing to one of these procedures. It's also a valuable reminder that physic...
Source: University of Exeter  Feb 16, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke and vascular dementia.   Led by the University of Exeter and funded by the British Heart Foundation, the team has developed a new technique  that allows ...
Source: University of Virginia  Feb 15, 2019  3 years ago
An antidepressant drug used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder could save people from deadly sepsis, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. Sepsis is a significant cause of death around the world. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Infection calls it "the body's extreme response to an infection." Essentially, the body's immune re...
Source: University of Leicester  Feb 14, 2019  3 years ago
Results from a phase II clinical trial, experimental work on cells and computational modelling have together shown why the first pill for asthma in 20 years can help reduce asthma attacks. Researchers from Leicester (UK) and Vancouver (Canada) have shown that the investigational drug, Fevipiprant (an oral, selective prostaglandin D2 receptor antagonist), reduces the amount of smooth muscle in t...
Source: University of Cambridge/ University of Leicester  Feb 13, 2019  3 years ago
A blood test has been developed that could save countless lives by improving early detection of lung cancer. The test measures circulating DNA that is shed by cancer cells as they grow and multiply. Scientists believe it could predict the presence of low-grade tumours in the lungs long before they become a threat.   New research led by scientists at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Toxico...
Source: Stanford University School of Medicine  Feb 12, 2019  3 years ago
An antibody-based treatment can gently and effectively eliminate diseased blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow to prepare for the transplantation of healthy stem cells, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The researchers believe the treatment could circumvent the need to use harsh, potentially life-threatening chemotherapy or radiati...
Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center  Feb 11, 2019  3 years ago
Lightheadedness with standing, otherwise known as postural lightheadedness, results from a gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults. While mild in many adults, it has been cited as an important contributing factor in some harmful clinical events, such as falls. As a result, greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving f...
Source: The Institute of Cancer Research, London  Feb 10, 2019  3 years ago
A brand new type of cancer drug that acts as a ‘Trojan horse’ to get inside tumour cells has shown promise in patients with six different cancer types. In patients with advanced, drug-resistant cancers, over a quarter with cervical and bladder tumours, and nearly 15 per cent with ovarian and lung tumours, responded to the new treatment. The innovative new drug, called tisotumab ved...
Source: Duke University Medical Center  Feb 09, 2019  3 years ago
The use of MRI to determine heart function has been slow to catch on, but a study from Duke Health researchers shows that stress cardiac MRI not only diagnoses disease, but can also predict which cases are potentially fatal. Results from a large, multi-center study suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance, or CMR, has potential as a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, ...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Feb 08, 2019  3 years ago
An MIT-led research team has developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin, potentially replacing the injections that people with type 2 diabetes have to give themselves every day. An MIT-led research team has developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin. Credit: Felice Frankel About the size of a blueberry, the capsule contains a...
Source: University Of Waterloo  Feb 07, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new way to prevent and treat Chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection in the world. Chlamydia in a human cell. The new treatment differs from the traditional anti-biotic treatment as it is a type of gene therapy that is delivered via nanotechnology and is showing a 65 per cent success rate in preventing c...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Feb 06, 2019  3 years ago
Mutations that cause esophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) have been mapped in unprecedented detail -- unveiling that more than half could be targeted by drugs currently in trials for other cancer types. This research, published  in Nature Genetics, could help stratify esophageal cancer patients to give them more personalised therapies. This could provide options not currently available to ...
Source: McGill University  Feb 05, 2019  3 years ago
Two new papers, published simultaneously in Nature Communications and led by researchers at McGill University, offer promise that a drug currently used to treat estrogen positive breast cancer may be effective in treating two different types of cancer, one rare and one common form.     The breakthrough discovery launching this research came in 2014 when Dr. William Foulkes, ...
Source: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio  Feb 04, 2019  3 years ago
In long-term survivors of childhood cancer, cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of early death from non-cancer causes. In a new study, published in JAMA Oncology, researchers compared four chemotherapy drugs with development of cardiomyopathy (abnormal heart muscle with impaired function) years after treatment.     "Exposure to anthracycline chemotherapies, such ...
Source: Universitat Polytechnica de Valencia (UPV),Spain  Feb 03, 2019  3 years ago
Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis, are difficult to diagnose, specially in early stages. Specifically, in the case of lupus, specific antibodies aimed at antigens located in the nucleus of cells appear, including the anti-Ro/SSA. These anti-Ro/SSA antibodies can be found in the blood before other autoantibodies related with lupus, and can even be det...
Source: Duke University Medical Center  Feb 02, 2019  3 years ago
A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. According to the 40-person study published in the journal PLOS ONE, emergency patients who underwent a treadmill stress test and showed signs of decreased blood flow to the heart also had changes in five met...
Source: University of San Diego  Feb 01, 2019  3 years ago
Search for a description of "p53" and it becomes clear that this human protein is widely known for its cancer-fighting benefits, leading to its renown as "the guardian of the genome." Scientists at the University of California San Diego have published a new study challenging that description. Studying the "wild type" version of p53 (WTp53), the form that exists b...
Source: Howard Hughes Medical Institute  Jan 31, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers can now quickly and accurately count a hidden, inactive form of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that lurks in patients' cells. This version of HIV embeds into cells' genomes and can persist despite otherwise successful therapies, thwarting attempts to cure the infection. Using a new genetic technique developed by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Robert Sil...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 30, 2019  3 years ago
An often-overlooked type of STD, oral gonorrhea presents a challenge for healthcare in Thailand and globally. The threat this bacterial infection poses is not limited to the disease itself – there are large-scale public health issues related both to long-term inflammation by an infection in the throat or mouth left untreated and to the wrongful prescription of certain antibiotics that give r...
Source: Purdue University  Jan 29, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers have been struggling for years to find a treatment for patients who have a recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive blood cancer that is one of the most lethal cancers. About 19,520 news cases are diagnosed a year, and about 10,670 people a year die from it, according to the American Cancer Society. Purdue University researchers are developing a series of drug compo...
Source: University of California - San Diego  Jan 28, 2019  3 years ago
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has identified a genetic pathway that causes some individuals to develop an abnormal heart rhythm, or arrhythmia, after experiencing a heart attack. They have also identified a drug candidate that can block this pathway. "We now know one reason why a significant fraction of the public could develop secondary complications p...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 28, 2019  3 years ago
In recent years, various agencies within the Thai government have made concerted efforts to curb private medical institutions’ independence by installing burdensome regulations -- most recently by seeking to control what these businesses can charge for specific medicines, procedures, and supplies. Their basic rationale is that cost controls and other measures are necessary to ensure the best...
Source: University of California, San Francisco  Jan 28, 2019  3 years ago
Regular use of a common type of medication, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, significantly improves survival for a third or more patients with head and neck cancer, a new study led by UC San Francisco has found. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, improved the overall five-year survival rate from 25 percent to 78 percent for patients whose cancer contained a specific...
Source: Brigham and Women's Hospital  Jan 27, 2019  3 years ago
BRCA1 and BRCA2 ("BReast CAncer genes") are critical tumor suppressor genes—women carrying a mutation in one of these genes have up to an 80 percent risk of developing breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of developing ovarian cancer. Cancer drugs known as Parp inhibitors have recently been approved for treating patients with BRCA-driven metastatic breast cancer or recurrent ovarian...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 26, 2019  3 years ago
The Thai conglomerate, Charoen Pokphand Group is one of the world’s largest. It is also Thailand’s largest private company. With investments in over 30 countries and a huge presence in the Chinese market the group employs over 350,000 staff. It’s 3 core businesses operate in: Agribusiness & Food Retail & Distribution Telecommunications industries So, it was with sur...
Source: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine  Jan 26, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. In a paper published  in the Journal of Immunology the team, led by LSTM's Professor Richard Pleass, show that by engineering a part of an antibody they can target ...
Source: Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Dept, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona   Jan 25, 2019  3 years ago
A European team of researchers reports that modifying an adenovirus a certain way made it an effective tumor killer in mice with retinoblastoma. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the researchers describe modifying the virus and testing its effectiveness in treating retinoblastoma. Retinoblastoma, as its name implies, is a cancer of the retina. It is mos...
Source: Cortexyme, Inc, US  Jan 24, 2019  3 years ago
Cortexyme, Inc., a privately held, clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing therapeutics to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other degenerative disorders, today announced publication of a foundational paper supporting its approach in Science Advances. In the paper, an international team of researchers led by Cortexyme co-founders Stephen Dominy, M.D. and Casey Lync...
Source: NYU Langone Health, New York  Jan 23, 2019  3 years ago
Most studies evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for facial rejuvenation and other cosmetic procedures have reported positive results, according to a critical review in the publication: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). PRP Injections are reportedly the latests trends of 2019 for Aesthetic Clinics a...
Source: Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University  Jan 23, 2019  3 years ago
Lingering inflammation in the colon is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer and now scientists report one way it resets the stage to enable this common and often deadly cancer. Inflammation is supposed to be a short-term response to an infection or other irritant in the body that is essential to eliminating it. But when inflammation persists, it can contribute to a myriad of common condit...
Source: University of Pennsylvania  Jan 22, 2019  3 years ago
Immune cells called macrophages are supposed to serve and protect, but cancer has found ways to put them to sleep. Now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they've identified how to fuel macrophages with the energy needed to attack and eat cancer cells. It is well established that macrophages can either support cancer cell growth and spread or hinder ...
Source: Flinders University  Jan 21, 2019  3 years ago
A new antibiotic developed by a Flinders University researcher is being heralded as a breakthrough in the war against a drug resistant superbug. Bacteria are winning the fight against antibiotics as they evolve to fight off traditional treatments, threatening decades of advancements in modern medicine, with predictions they will kill over 10 million people by 2050. The scientific development o...
Source: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW  Jan 20, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated for the first time. The discovery, pu...
Source: Hong Kong Baptist University  Jan 19, 2019  3 years ago
Epstein-Barr virus infects more than 95 percent of people, usually without symptoms. But sometimes its persistence in cells can lead to tumor formation. Now, researchers from Hong Kong and the UK have developed a fluorescing, molecular-sized probe, called L2P4, which can inhibit Epstein-Barr-related tumor growth while allowing researchers to see the targeted tumor cells. Epstein-Barr v...

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