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BREAKING NEWS
Genomics and Epigenetics
Featuring all the latest about the newest branch of specialty in the Medical World. From Gene Mapping, new understandings of various Cellular Pathways to breakthroughs in Gene Slicing and Recombinant techniques and even new Gene related treatments.
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Source: Thailand Medical News  Dec 09, 2019
An individual’s risk of developing cancer is affected by genetic variations in regions of DNA that don’t code for proteins, previously dismissed as ‘junk DNA’, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer last week. Professor Dr John Quackenbush, from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and lead author of the study told Thailand Me...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 30, 2019
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a specific gene, the HDAC9 gene in the calcification of the human aorta, the largest blood vessel in the body. Typically, Cardiovascular Arterial wall calcification is the buildup of calcium in the blood vessel walls, which can often be a predictor of serious cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes. Scientists have long ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 28, 2019
Typically, It is the wish of every molecular geneticist: an easy-to-use program that compares data sets from different cellular conditions, identifies enhancer regions and then assigns them to their target genes. A research team led by Martin Vingron at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has now developed a program that masters all of this. Dr Martin Vingron, Director and H...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 24, 2019
Researchers from Uppsala University, Sweden in a new study have shown that whole-genome sequencing increases the precision of genetic studies, which in turn can improve our perspectives of how to use biomarkers to discover disease. The results are published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports. Typically, biomarkers, such as specific proteins circulating in our blood stream, are...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 22, 2019
Typically, one of the ways a cancer-causing gene works up enough power to turn a normal cell into a cancer cell is by copying itself over and over, like a Xerox machine. Scientists have long noticed that when cancer-causing genes do that, they also scoop up some extra DNA into their copies. But it has remained unclear whether the additional DNA helps drive cancer or is just along for the ride. ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 18, 2019
Salk Institute researchers have developed a new gene therapy to help decelerate the aging process. Aging is a leading risk factor for a number of debilitating conditions, including heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease, to name a few. This makes the need for anti-aging therapies all the more urgent.   The research findings, published in the journal Nature Medicine, highligh...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 15, 2019
A new study by the University of Rochester Medical Center New indicates that the benefits of a dietary compound on kidney health may depend on an individual's genetics. The findings may be helpful for tailoring interventions to prevent or treat kidney disease. GSTM1 or Glutathione S-transferase mu-1 is an enzyme that plays a role in ridding the body of toxins and combatting oxidative stress...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Nov 10, 2019
Researchers from Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, DTU Biosustain have developed a new genome editing tool tool called the CRISPR-BEST. Although existing CRISPR technologies allow for better manipulation of genomes with many positive effects on modern drug development and the discovery of new and better antibiotics, significant problems such as genome instability and toxicity o...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Oct 31, 2019
A group of genomic researchers led by Dr Julián Cerón of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), has taken advantage of the similarity between the amino acids and genes of humans and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and their expertise in CRISPR gene editing to mimic in C. elegans, the SF3B1 mutations found in human tumors. Although the one-millimeter worm t...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Oct 26, 2019
Cas13, a common gene-editing enzyme could be used to disable RNA viruses such as flu, Zika  or Ebola. CRISPR is usually thought of as a laboratory tool to edit DNA in order to fix genetic defects or enhance certain traits but in reality, the mechanism originally evolved in bacteria as a way to fend off viruses called bacteriophages. Researchers have previously adapted the Cas13 enzyme as a...