Anti-aging
Explore all the new trends and developments in the world of Anti-aging Medicine and Geriatrics including aspects of Aesthetic Medicine, Endocrine Medicine and also Healthcare trends.
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Source: University of Southern California  Mar 07, 2019
A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say. Researchers emphasize that the study, recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, was in mice, and many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments. Nevertheless, the findings lend credence t...
Source: University of Luxembourg  Mar 04, 2019
Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalised stem cells improve the regeneration of injured or diseased areas in the brain of old mice. The researchers expect that their approach will provide fresh impetus in r...
Source: Oregon Health and Science University  Feb 16, 2019
A team of researchers from Oregon Health and Science University has concluded from an extensive study involving a medicinal plant called Centella Asiatica, commonly known as Gotu Kola (in thai: bua bok ) is effective in terms of improving memory especially in the elderly and those afflicted with cognitive related diseases. Centella Asiatica  contains a variety of phyto chemicals such ...
Source: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center  Feb 03, 2019
Dr. Paul Harch, Clinical Professor and Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, Chairman of Radiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, report the first PET scan-documented case of improvement in brain metabolism in Alzheimer's disease in a patient treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT).  The authors...
Source: Washington University School of Medicine  Jan 22, 2019
A simple blood test reliably detects signs of brain damage in people on the path to developing Alzheimer’s disease – even before they show signs of confusion and memory loss, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Germany. The findings, published in Nature Medicine, may one day be ap...