BREAKING NEWS
HIV / AIDs
Read all about the latests in HIV/Aids research and treatment protocols and also developments made into various specific components of managing this disease that is by itself also evolving.
Presented by
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 15, 2019
Findings from the recent START study involving 4684 adult HIV-positive patients from various countries showed that starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significant benefits and entails few risks for individuals with a low pre-treatment viral load. All the patients in the study had a CD4 cell count above 500 cells/mm3 and were randomised to start immediate ART or to defer therapy until th...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 22, 2019
New immunity cells known as CD11c+ dendritic cells have been identified by a team of researchers from The Westmead Institute For Medical Research in Sydney.These CD11c+ dendritic cells are extremely susceptible to the HIV virus and can transmit the virus to other cells especially the CD4 T Cells. These CD11c+ dendritic cells are a type of dendritic cells that play a role in capturing any i...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 04, 2019
Most HIV patients have a 60% risk of developing a form of cancer during their life-span. Cancers like Lymphoma, Lung Cancer, Anal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Oral and oropharyngeal cancer ,liver cancer, skin cancer and also Kaposi's sarcoma are most prevalent among HIV patients.  At the recent ASCO presentation, study led by doctors at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that pati...
Source: La Jolla Institute for Immunology, California  May 11, 2019
A new HIV vaccine delivery strategy appears to enhance the protective immune response in a preclinical model. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered that delivering an HIV vaccine in small doses over a series of days leads to a stronger immune response than when the same vaccine is given all at once.   A similar escalating dose method could be the best way...
Source: NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,US  Apr 18, 2019
Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, according to a report published online today in The New England Journal of Medicine. Results of the Phase 2, open-label study indicate the antibody, known as UB-42...