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Latests Medical News from around the world and also Thailand, bringing you updates, discoveries, studies and findings on various aspects and diseases in the medical world. Most of these articles are not only meant for Doctors In Thailand or Hospitals In Thailand but also for any patients or health conscious individuals wanting to know more.
Source: Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University  Jan 23, 2019  3 years ago
Lingering inflammation in the colon is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer and now scientists report one way it resets the stage to enable this common and often deadly cancer. Inflammation is supposed to be a short-term response to an infection or other irritant in the body that is essential to eliminating it. But when inflammation persists, it can contribute to a myriad of common condit...
Source: University of Pennsylvania  Jan 22, 2019  3 years ago
Immune cells called macrophages are supposed to serve and protect, but cancer has found ways to put them to sleep. Now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they've identified how to fuel macrophages with the energy needed to attack and eat cancer cells. It is well established that macrophages can either support cancer cell growth and spread or hinder ...
Source: Flinders University  Jan 21, 2019  3 years ago
A new antibiotic developed by a Flinders University researcher is being heralded as a breakthrough in the war against a drug resistant superbug. Bacteria are winning the fight against antibiotics as they evolve to fight off traditional treatments, threatening decades of advancements in modern medicine, with predictions they will kill over 10 million people by 2050. The scientific development o...
Source: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW  Jan 20, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated for the first time. The discovery, pu...
Source: Hong Kong Baptist University  Jan 19, 2019  3 years ago
Epstein-Barr virus infects more than 95 percent of people, usually without symptoms. But sometimes its persistence in cells can lead to tumor formation. Now, researchers from Hong Kong and the UK have developed a fluorescing, molecular-sized probe, called L2P4, which can inhibit Epstein-Barr-related tumor growth while allowing researchers to see the targeted tumor cells. Epstein-Barr v...
Source: US FDA  Jan 18, 2019  3 years ago
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a safety alert regarding the possibility of an increased risk of death associated with the use of paclitaxel-coated balloons and paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The FDA's communication follows a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Heart Association ...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 18, 2019  3 years ago
Various research reports on Thailand’s role in the production, local dissemination and exportation to domestic as well as international markets for medical devices reveal healthy forecasts. Predications are that the medical device market in the country  will continue to grow at average rates of between 8.5-10% per annum. Such strength in growth opens exciting opportunities for the Me...
Source: Washington University School of Medicine , St. Louis   Jan 18, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists working to develop more effective treatments for diabetes are turning to stem cells. Such cells can be transformed into cells that produce insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more ...
Source: NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine  Jan 17, 2019  4 years ago
A new class of engineered proteins may counter infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus -- a bacterial species considered one of the largest global health threats, a new study suggests. Published online Jan. 16 in Science Translational Medicine, the study is the result of a five-year research partnership between scientists at NYU School of Medicine and Janssen Research & Dev...
Source: Hong Kong University  Jan 16, 2019  4 years ago
The world has been repeatedly plagued by infectious disease outbreaks, including SARS and MERS coronaviruses, avian influenza viruses, and Zika virus. A team at the Medical Faculty of The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) led by Professor Yuen Kwok-yung and Dr Shuofeng Yuan of the Department of Microbiology, has discovered a novel broad-spectrum antiviral drug that would be strategic for epidemic c...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 16, 2019  4 years ago
The bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) is sexually transmitted and can cause inflammation of the urinary and genital tracts in men and women. This germ may also be linked to other problems, including some cases of arthritis and, in women, pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. MG appears to be spread by unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, as it can be detected in fluid s...
Source: PLOS  Jan 15, 2019  4 years ago
A practical resource-based public health approach for the rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals living in low- and middle-income countries could save thousands of lives, according to an Essay published January 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Mark Tenforde of the University of Washington School of Medicine, and colleagues. Effective antir...
Source: Hyogo College of Medicine, Japan  Jan 15, 2019  4 years ago
In a recent study conducted by Professor Dr. Tadayuki Oshima and Professor Dr. Eitatsu Arai from Hyogo College of Medicine, in Japan , demonstrated that the potassium-competitive acid blocker (P-CAB) vonoprazan demonstrates superior efficacy in the treatment of patients with erosive oesophagitis compared with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole, with the results of a small ...
Source: North American Menopause Society (NAMS).  Jan 14, 2019  4 years ago
There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results. A new large-scale study from Korea shows that women receiving HT had a significantly lower prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with women who did not take hormones. Study results are published online in Menopause, the ...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Jan 13, 2019  4 years ago
Spondyloarthritis is one of the most common types of chronic joint inflammation affecting nearly 1-2% of the Western population. Cytokine blockade of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and more recently Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has revolutionized the perspectives of patients suffering from this disease by achieving high levels of therapeutic efficacy. The disease differs substantially from rheumatoid arthr...
Source: Loyola University Health System  Jan 12, 2019  4 years ago
A landmark study co-authored by a Loyola Medicine oncologist has found that a newer targeted drug is significantly more effective than standard therapy for treating elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The drug, ibrutinib, attacks cancer cells without damaging normal cells, thus causing fewer side effects. The drug is taken as a pill once a day -- much more convenient than ...
Source: University Of Basel  Jan 11, 2019  4 years ago
The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. In the journal Cell, the team of molecular biologists, computational biologists, and clinicians reports on their interdisciplinary approach. The ima...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Jan 10, 2019  4 years ago
New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. Researchers proposed two explanations for the association of heightened immune responses in patients with schizophrenia and EBV in...
Source: Arizona State University  Jan 09, 2019  4 years ago
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD).   Lead authors Ramon Velazquez and Salvatore Oddo, along with their colleagues in the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), investigate the effects of choline, an important nutrient that ma...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Jan 08, 2019  4 years ago
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a protein involved in cell proliferation and the development of new blood vessels that could serve as a marker for the early detection of colorectal cancers. In laboratory studies, investigators found that expression of the protein, called beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase-V (beta-1,4-GalT-V), was increased in human colorectal cancer tumor cells compared ...
Source: DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)  Jan 07, 2019  4 years ago
A research team led by Professor Sung Bae Lee of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Professor Daehee Hwang of New Biology (Vice-head of the Plant Age and Life Research Group, IBS) has identified the early neuropathology mechanism of structural characteristics of polyglutamine toxic protein on neurodegenerative brain disorders. It was through a joint research with Professor Yuh Nung Jan at the Howard...
Source: Baylor College of Medicine  Jan 06, 2019  4 years ago
Fungal infections are emerging as a major medical challenge, and a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a mouse model to study the short-term consequences of fungal infection in the brain. The researchers report in the journal Nature Communications the unexpected finding that the common yeast Candida albicans, a type of fungus, can cross the blood-b...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Jan 06, 2019  4 years ago
Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells. In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol...
Source: University Of Zurich  Jan 01, 2019  4 years ago
Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease of the lung, for which there is currently no cure. The underlying cause of the disease is a malfunction of the chloride channel CFTR, which prevents the secretion of chloride in certain body cells. This leads to dehydration of the mucus layer in the lung. A promising approach for treating cystic fibrosis is the activation of the calcium-activated chlo...
Source: Osaka University  Dec 30, 2018  4 years ago
A team of researchers led by Osaka University examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli (CR-E) in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent. This Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a non-pathogenic bacterium, so the residents have no symptom...
Source: University of Southern California  Dec 28, 2018  4 years ago
A new study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers shows there's yet another reason to avoid a high fat, high cholesterol diet: It can trigger changes in the immune system that lead to a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States, and an estimated 2...
Source: University Of Toronto  Dec 26, 2018  4 years ago
Letrozole was found to damage normal function in the hippocampus of monkeys The animals also showed anxiety and hot flashes after four weeks of treatment Side effects like fatigue are experienced by up to 30% of women on the drug   A drug commonly given out  to breast-cancer patients may affect their brain function and memory, research suggests.Letrozole is primarily used to treat b...
Source: Dallas Morning News (Anna Kuchment)  Dec 25, 2018  4 years ago
Medical researchers fear that more children will develop paralysis from a mysterious polio like illness that has struck every two years since 2014. The condition, known as acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, is rare and has reached its peak for 2018. It will likely continue to fade as winter approaches. But many believe it will be back.   D68 Enterovirus "AFM is here, and it doesn't se...
Source: University Of Virginia School Of Medicine  Dec 23, 2018  4 years ago
A group of genes called SLCs that has been largely ignored by scientists could play critical roles in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), inflammation, and likely obesity and other metabolic diseases, new research suggests.The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in the context of how our bodies recognize and remove dying cells. SLC Gene &nb...
Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital  Dec 22, 2018  4 years ago
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a subset of helper T cells that may help to redefine understanding and treatment of chronic, debilitating inflammatory disorders. The study focused on a family of helper T cells called Th17 cells. Th17 cells help to launch the immune response against fungal infection and other threats. These cells can also fuel the destructive i...
Source: Yale University  Dec 21, 2018  4 years ago
In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell. Researchers around the world have been racing to create therapies that unleash th...
Source: Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 20, 2018  4 years ago
In a phase three clinical trial, a drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for two years in 80 percent of patients who completed treatment, a significant increase in progression-free survival compared with placebo. (Progression-free survival is the length of time a patient lives without worsening of the disease). There is no standard of care for patients with desmo...
Source: Rutgers University  Dec 15, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. A team of Rutgers scientists, including Leonard Lee and Shaohua Li, have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce ...
Source: Harvard Medical School  Dec 14, 2018  4 years ago
The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led by investigators at Harvard Medical School suggests that weakened metabolism of immune T cells may be p...
Source: Thai PBS World  Dec 13, 2018  4 years ago
Vegetables and fruits found in lunches for students under the government-sponsored lunch programme are almost 100 percent contaminated with pesticides and 99 percent of the urine samples from students and teachers in four provinces were tested with organophosphate, a deadly toxic pesticide that attacks nervous system. The above alarming findings were the result of a research jointly conducted by...
Source: University of Basel  Dec 13, 2018  4 years ago
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. The widely used...
Source: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil  Dec 12, 2018  4 years ago
Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed that a natural flavonoid is effective at treating Leishmania amazonensis infections. Leishmaniasis is endemic to 98 countries and affect...
Source: University of Glasgow  Dec 11, 2018  4 years ago
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for a transplant, dialysis is a life-saving treatment. New research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in the Journal Ame...
Source: TMN  Dec 10, 2018  4 years ago
 CAP or Community-acquired pneumonia disproportionately affects older people, with high rates of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Although pneumococcal vaccines are routinely recommended for this population, fewer than 40% of adults age 60 and older get vaccinated. Thus, antibiotics are key to treating CAP in the elderly—and the earlier that antibiotic therapy starts, the bett...
Source: University of Birmingham  Dec 09, 2018  4 years ago
The  large scale systematic review published in The Cochrane Library as part of a Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews bringing together a vast  body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer. The suite of eleven reviews was led by Dr Jac Dinnes at the University of Birmingham and supported by the Cochrane Skin Group and a team of over 30 researc...
Source: University of Montreal  Dec 07, 2018  4 years ago
A team of researchers at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at Université de Montréal has demonstrated that a cancer vaccine can work. Not only that, it could become an extremely effective, non-invasive and cost-effective cancer -fighting tool.   The team's work was published yesterday in Science Translational Medicine.The discovery repres...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center, US.  Dec 06, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice.Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke.   Blo...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine  Dec 05, 2018  4 years ago
The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.   Little or no mycoplasma DnaK DNA sequences were found associated with the tumor, which was ful...
Source: Tuff University  Dec 04, 2018  4 years ago
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features ...
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center  Dec 03, 2018  4 years ago
An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy—to be published on-line Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine (and presented at the ASH annual meeting in San Diego)—found that 52 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy; 40 percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response. One year later, 65 percent percent of those patients w...
Source: University Of Alabama at Birmingham  Dec 02, 2018  4 years ago
Preclinical experiments by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. HPV infections caused an estimated 266,000 deaths from cervical cancer worldwide in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Routine screening by Pap smears or HPV D...
Source: University Of Montreal  Dec 01, 2018  4 years ago
Of the 50 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Canadian scientists think they've found an important clue. TRIM5 Alpha protein Working in collaboration with a team...
Source: University Of Zurich  Nov 30, 2018  4 years ago
Stem cell transplantation is effective against leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue—often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process. Blocking this molecule could significantly improve the outcome of patients receivin...
Source: Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute for Medical Research  Nov 29, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists have uncovered that an emerging gene therapy for Parkinson's disease creates new circuits in the brain associated with improved motor movement. These findings, published today in Science Translational Medicine by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Professor David Eidelberg, MD, and his team, explain the therapeutic mechanisms involved in the emerging Parkinson's ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University Of Medicine  Nov 28, 2018  4 years ago
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells, but show no viral load in blood tests. While based on small numbers, the data suggest that long-term viral remission migh...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center   Nov 27, 2018  4 years ago
A new study has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. If confirmed in humans, they could lead to more effective ways to control certain aggressive types of prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death for men in the world. Men whose  prostrate cancer tumor...
Source: University of Minnesota  Nov 26, 2018  4 years ago
A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body. After targeting the "motors" that generate forces in cancer cells to move, the cancer ce...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Nov 25, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research identified the mechanisms by which the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile kills intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), thus destroying the protective mucosal barrier of the intestinal tract. The researchers demonstrate the physiological relevance of this process during infection and have published their findings in Nature Commu...
Source: University Of Manchester  Nov 23, 2018  4 years ago
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease. The discovery is a major advance in understanding of the significantly under-diagnosed disorder which, if left undetected, can lead to failing kidneys that need dialysis or kidney transplantation.    The discovery of 35 kidney &n...
Source: Ministry Of Foreign Affairs (Thailand)  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
 On 21 November 2018, the Prince Mahidol Award Foundation under the Royal Patronage (PMAF) held a joint press conference at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, to announce the 27th Prince Mahidol Laureates for 2018 in the field of Medicine and Public Health. Ms. Busadee Santipitaks, Director-General of the Department of Information, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, in the capacity of the ...

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