Contrary To Misinformation, COVID-19 Mortality And Hospitalization Has Been Rising In The Last 30 Days Globally. Please Take Precautions!

BREAKING NEWS
Source: TMN  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
Most medical insurance plans sold in Thailand, including those packaged with life insurance policies, focus on providing basic hospital Inpatient (IPD) coverage. With IPD coverage, a doctor has to admit you to the hospital to stay overnight. To get you admitted, the doctor has to certify that you have a medical problem that requires you to stay in the hospital at least one night. (While some insu...
Source: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
With only two treatment options for primary biliary cholangitis, some hepatologists have cast a new eye on an older class of drugs. Fibrates, used for the treatment of dyslipidemia in the United States since the 1970s, had been shown to decrease levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), said Cynthia Levy, MD, FAASLD, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Miami Miller School of Medic...
Source: University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
With a new groundbreaking technique, researchers from University of Copenhagen have managed to identify a protein that is responsible for cellular memory being transmitted when cells divide. The finding is crucial for understanding development from one cell to a whole body. The cells in our body divide constantly throughout life. But how do cells remember whether to develop into a skin, liver or ...
Source: Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung DZD  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
Polyneuropathy is one of the most common complications in people with diabetes. However, it can also occur with certain risk factors or diseases before the onset of diabetes. First symptoms are often pins-and-needles sensations in the feet. Although polyneuropathy is present in about 30% of people with diabetes, it often remains undiagnosed. Scientists from the German Diabetes Center (DDZ) in D&uu...
Source: European Society of Cardiology  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
Very high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or "good") cholesterol may be associated with an increased risk of heart attack and death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.  HDL Cholesterol   Study author Dr. Marc Allard-Ratick, of Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, US, said: "It may be time to change the way we view HDL cholesterol....
Source: National University of Science and Technology MISIS  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
A research group consisting of scientists from NUST MISIS, the Technical University of Munich, Helmholtz Zentrum München, the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the University of Oldenburg has developed a system that allows doctors to both improve the accuracy of diagnosing malignant cells and to provide additional opportunities for cancer treatment. The magnetoferritin compound is the main el...
Source: Harvard Medical School  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
For decades researchers have worked to shed light on the causes of neurodegenerative disorders, a group of devastating conditions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, that involve the progressive loss of neurons and nervous system function. In recent years, numerous factors, from genetic mutations to viral infections, have been found to contribute to the development of these diseases. ...
Source: University of Exeter  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
I have made my views on homeopathy clear on many occasions — actually, I don’t see them as ‘views’ but as evidence-based statements. But this has never stopped the homeopathy brigade vehemently disagreeing with me. Not only that, they also claim that I cannot be trusted because I am biased, corrupt, incompetent and dishonest.     Professor Edzard Ernst &...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Aug 28, 2018  4 years ago
An experimental drug can successfully reverse hair loss, hair whitening and skin inflammation linked by previous studies to human diets heavy in fat and cholesterol, according to a new Johns Hopkins study in mice.   The investigators say the compound halts the production of glycosphingolipids, or GSLs, that are major components of skin and other cell membranes. Current research shows that mic...
Source: Journal Neurology  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
Drugs taken in pregnancy to prevent epilepsy seizures can raise the risk of language delays in children. But new research shows that folic acid supplements can cut that risk.       One U.S. ob/gyn said the finding has real importance for his younger female patients. "The risk of language delay was decreased by half—the benefit of folic acid in this situation is...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
It's nearly a decade since the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was first introduced in the UK to help protect against the virus that causes most cases of cervical cancer. But until now, it has only been routinely offered to girls.   Today, the Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) recommended that adolescent boys should now also receive the vaccine.    ...
Source: European Molecular Biology Laboratory  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
The effectiveness of antibiotics can be altered by combining them with each other, non-antibiotic drugs or even with food additives. Depending on the bacterial species, some combinations stop antibiotics from working to their full potential whilst others begin to defeat antibiotic resistance.  Combining antibiotics changes their effectiveness. In the first large-scale screening of its kin...
Source: University Of Geneva  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
Brain injuries, particularly the milder ones, are difficult to accurately diagnose. CT scanners can help, but often they just don’t have the resolution for clinicians to identify unusual aberrations in the image. Moreover, they expose patients to radiation, are not always available, and the process of using them and evaluating the images produced can take quite some time before results are a...
Source: Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
Raza M. Alvi, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues compared characteristics, cardiac structure, and outcomes in 394 persons with HIV and heart failure who were receiving PI (145 patients) versus non-PI (NPI; 249 patients) therapy. PI-based antiretroviral therapy contained boosted-dose ritonavir.   Ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) therapy is a...
Source: Kobe University  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
By destroying the regulatory genes of the AIDS virus HIV-1 using the genome editing system CRISPR/Cas9, a Japanese research group has succeeded in blocking the production of HIV-1 by infected cells.   Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection is a chronic disease affecting more than 35 million people worldwide. The infection can be controlled by antiretroviral therapy (ART), but the...
Source: The Journal of Physiology  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
Eating high fibre foods may reduce the effects of stress on our gut and behaviour, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.   Stress is a significant health concern and can cause major changes in the gut and in the brain, which can cause changes in behaviour. In recent years there has been growing interest in the link between gut bacteria and stres...
Source: Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
Researchers have discovered a new nuclear medicine test that could improve care of patients with type 1 diabetes. The new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method could measure beta-cell mass, which would greatly enhance the ability to monitor and guide diabetes therapies. This study is reported in the featured article of the month in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's August issu...
Source: American Heart Association  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
A new test to assess a whether or not someone is having a heart attack upon arriving in the emergency room was safe and effective, ruling out heart attack in emergency room patients faster than a conventional method, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.       The new high-sensitivity blood test for cardiac troponin, g...
Source: National University Of Singapore  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
A research team led by scientists from the Cancer Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a novel peptide drug called FFW that could potentially stop the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or primary liver cancer. This landmark discovery opens the door for more effective treatment of liver cancer with less side effects.   ...
Source: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
New anti-cancer drugs put cancers to sleep—permanently In a world first, Melbourne scientists have discovered a new type of anti-cancer drug that can put cancer cells into a permanent sleep, without the harmful side-effects caused by conventional cancer therapies.   Published today in the journal Nature, the research reveals the first class of anti-cancer drugs that work...
Source: Mount Sinai School Of Medicine  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
A new gene associated with disease severity in models of rheumatoid arthritis has been identified by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The discovery could provide a new pathway for treatment and a way to measure the prognosis of patients diagnosed with the autoimmune condition. Through a series of experiments -- on synovial cells from the inner lining of joints in humans...
Source: University of Virginia  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
A new discovery about the effects of aging in our cells could allow doctors to cure or prevent diabetes, fatty liver disease and other metabolic diseases—and possibly even turn back the clock on aging itself.     Irina M. Bochkis, Ph.D., of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, has made a new discovery that could let us prevent or cure diseases such as diabetes and fatty ...
Source: Technical University of Denmark   Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
For decades, researchers have been finding ways to fight disease-causing bacteria in food production without the use of antibiotics. This is because bacteria continuously become resistant to antibiotics due to repeated and improper use.   In a study published in the journal PLOS One, researchers at the National Food Institute of the Technical University of Denmark ha...
Source: Staff Writer, TMN  Aug 08, 2018  5 years ago
Is DermaPen Safe?   If you research dermabrasion or micro needling, you’ll eventually come across a little device called DermaPen. This type of tool has become a darling of many skin care professionals and aestheticians, who tout the product to their clients as a new solution for skin tightening, with little or no down time. However, although your local spa or dermatologist office may g...
Source: Multiple  Jul 22, 2018  5 years ago
For patients with the herpes simplex-1 virus (HSV-1), there are just a handful of drugs available to treat the painful condition that can affect the eyes, mouth and genitals. If patients develop resistance to these drugs, there are even fewer choices left to treat the infection, which lasts for life.   BX795   Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have now identified a ...
Source: University of Connecticut   Jul 21, 2018  5 years ago
Despite efforts to eradicate it, syphilis is on the rise. Until now, most health agencies focused on treating infected people and their sex partners but new discoveries may make a vaccine possible, UConn Health researchers report.   The World Health Organization estimates that 10.7 million people between the ages of 15 and 49 had syphilis in 2012, and about 5.6 million people cont...
Source: Multiple  Jul 20, 2018  5 years ago
Chlamydia trachomatis is the main cause of sexually transmitted diseases. More than 131 million people are infected with this bacterium worldwide. If detected at an early stage and treated with antibiotics the infection with Chlamydia can be treated very well. However, infections with Chlamydia develop often without symptoms therefore in many cases remain unnoticed. This promotes the spread o...
Source: Multiple  Jul 19, 2018  5 years ago
Researchers have identified a protein that powers the virulence of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, opening the possibility of a new target for antibiotics and, even better, a vaccine.  The microbe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae   The findings, published today in PLOS Pathogens, are especially important since the microbe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is considered a "superbug" be...
Source: The Lancet  Jul 22, 2018  5 years ago
Study paves way for better use of primate models in HIV vaccine development   The mosaic vaccine HIV-1 vaccine produced comparable immune responses in both humans and rhesus monkeys, a phase I/IIa trial found.   In humans, the vaccine was safe and produced antibody responses and T-cell responses, and in monkeys, the vaccine not only produced similar immune responses, but protected again...
Source: Multiple  Jul 21, 2018  5 years ago
Scientists from UNSW Sydney and the UK have discovered that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hijacks a small molecule from the host cell to protect itself from being destroyed by the host's immune system.   Inositol hexakisphosphate fits into the pore structures (pink) of the HIV capsid (teal), and makes the makes the capsid stronger, protecting the genetic material inside. Credi...
Source: USFDA & Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 19, 2018  5 years ago
A small percentage of patients, some of whom have taken many HIV drugs in the past, have multidrug-resistant HIV, limiting their treatment options   HIV naturally mutates and eventually develops resistance to ARVs, which are then rendered ineffective. Patients infected with drug resistant strains of HIV are therefore commonly moved to alternative regimens known as 2nd line drugs. &n...
Source: Multiple  Jul 18, 2018  5 years ago
People living with HIV must take a combination of three or more different drugs every day for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, by following this strict treatment plan, they can suffer from side effects ranging from mild dizziness to life-threatening liver damage. However, if they stop taking the drugs, the virus hiding inside their cells can spontaneously resurface.   In fact...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 23, 2018  5 years ago
Britain's planned exit from the European Union is expected to result in restrictions on EU workers coming to the country, which could create further recruitment difficulties for the NHS.       The British government will loosen immigration rules to allow more doctors and nurses from outside the European Union to come and work for Britain's National Health Service (NHS), the...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 22, 2018  5 years ago
In order to expedite service at its hospital, Yanhee Hospital has adopted the practice of getting its nursing aides to use rollerblades to deliver files, test results, x-ray films, prescriptions etc. However TMN staff observed that none were using helmets and safety gear and neither was there specific zones for them in the hospital , so hospital vissitors and patients need to be more careful! &nb...
Source: Universiti Putra Malaysia  Jul 25, 2018  5 years ago
Over-the-counter painkillers like acetaminophen can damage the liver and cause serious health problems. A new study by Malaysian researchers suggested that compounds from a common fern can protect the liver from toxic acetaminophen.     Every day, the liver gets exposed to various substances, many of them toxic. It normally detoxifies and expels those toxic chemicals, but...
Source: University of Colorado School of Medicine  Jul 24, 2018  5 years ago
High-concentration peroxide, sometimes promoted in alternative medicine circles for cleanses or as a so-called "natural cure," can lead to numerous life-threatening ailments and death itself, according to a paper published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Outcomes Following High Concentration Peroxide Ingestions").   "Ingesting high-conce...
Source: Hunan Agricultural University  Jul 23, 2018  5 years ago
The medicinal mushroom known as “Reishi ” in Japan was the subject of a recent Chinese study on alternative treatments for recurrent oral ulceration (ROU). The results showed that freeze-dried reishi mushroom powder provided effective treatment for the most prevalent mouth ulcer disease in the world. ROU is considered an autoimmune disease. It is a frequent complication fo...
Source: The Journal of the American Medical Association  Jul 22, 2018  5 years ago
A new study suggests acupuncture could be effective   About half of women ages 40 to 60 experience bladder leaks, or urinary incontinence, according to the American College of Physicians. And a condition called stress incontinence—leaking urine when you cough, sneeze, exercise, or laugh—is one of the most common types. Treatments, which often include drugs and surgery, can be ...
Source: European Heart Journal  Jul 20, 2018  5 years ago
Experts urge caution with daily high-dose vitamin D supplements.     More is not necessarily better when it comes to the use of vitamin D supplements in patients with heart failure, based on results of a recent study published in the European Heart Journal. Known as the EVITA (Effect of Vitamin D on All-Cause Mortality in Heart Failure) trial, this study looked at the impact of daily ...
Source: American Heart Association  Jul 19, 2018  5 years ago
Stem cells from umbilical cords may improve heart function and symptoms. Stem cells from umbilical cords show promise as a treatment for heart failure, based on a recent study published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation Research.   Known as the RIMECARD trial, this study tested stem cell therapy in 30 patients living with chronic heart failure. The goal was t...
Source: Uppsala Universitet  Jul 23, 2018  5 years ago
Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications that turn our genes off or on. In a new study, researchers show that tea consumption in women leads to epigenetic changes in genes that are known to interact with cancer and estrogen metabolism.   Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications that turn our genes off or on. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that tea consum...
Source: Mayo Clinic  Jul 21, 2018  5 years ago
Six genes associated with pancreatic cancer have been identified by a research team at Mayo Clinic. The team finds that these genes can be inherited but are also present in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer.   The team recommends genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients as the new standard of care.   ‘Six genes contain mutations that can be inherited ...
Source: Multiple  Jul 23, 2018  5 years ago
Scientists examined whether diet may be affecting the success of Helicobacter pylori treatment, and looked at whether nutrients such as cholesterol and omega-3 fatty acids play a role.   Helicobacter pylori is a global health issue responsible for gastritis and gastric ulcers. Approximately 50% of the global population suffers from Helicobacter pylori infection, which...
Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center  Jul 22, 2018  5 years ago
Nearly 30 years ago, it was discovered that bacteria known as Helicobacter pylori were responsible for stomach ulcers. Since then, antibiotics have become the primary therapy used to combat the H. pylori infection, which affects approximately six percent of the world population and is also a primary cause of stomach cancer. But today the bacteria is growing increasingly resista...
Source: Massachusetts General Hospital  Jul 21, 2018  5 years ago
This week, meat-eaters receive another diet-based kick in the ribs. A new study, published in the journal Gut, links the consumption of red meat to an increased risk of developing diverticulitis.  A recent study uncovers a link between the consumption of red meat and diverticulitis. Diverticulitis is a relatively common complaint that occurs when bulging sacs appear in the lining...
Source: Reuters, Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 23, 2018  5 years ago
Scandal erupts over vaccine safety in China after standards violated A scandal over faulty vaccines in China has sparked anger on social media, underscoring the difficulties regulators face in rebuilding trust after years of food and drug safety scares. The incident is a major blow for Beijing's efforts to push domestically made vaccines and for China's drug regulator, which has been str...
Source: Technischen Universität München   Jul 20, 2018  5 years ago
The exact cause of irritable bowel syndrome has been unknown. However, scientists have identified an organic cause of irritable bowel syndromes, reveals a new study.       An international team with significant involvement from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has provided initial clues about the organic triggers of the disease, which affects an estimated one out of six peop...
Source: NHS,UK  Jul 21, 2018  5 years ago
Studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.       Men and women with type 2 diabetes may face a significantly higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease later in life, new British research suggests.   The finding of a link followed the tracking of Parkinson's diagnoses among millions o...
Source: Multiple  Jul 20, 2018  5 years ago
Improved medications for Type 2 diabetes are one step closer thanks to a new discovery reported this week by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Syracuse University. By modifying the key ingredient in current diabetes drugs, the researchers produced a compound that was effective for hyperglycemia in animal trials, yet without the most problematic side effects of current drugs. &n...
Source: Journal Diabetes Care  Jul 19, 2018  5 years ago
Improving HbA1c levels could reduce the risk of diabetic polyneuropathy among adults with type 2 diabetes, research suggests.   In a new Danish study, each 1% (11 mmol/mol) increase in HbA1c levels among adults with type 2 diabetes during a 10-year period increased polyneuropathy risk by nearly 66%.  The new research used data from the ADDITION-Denmark study, ...
Source: The North American Menopause Society  Jul 20, 2018  5 years ago
Heart disease is still the number one killer of US women, and hormone therapy remains a top treatment for menopause symptoms. A new study connects these two facts to demonstrate little effect of hormone therapy on artery thickness as a precursor to heart disease. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).   According...
Source: University of Edinburgh   Jul 21, 2018  5 years ago
People infected with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from heart disease, research has found. Analysis of global figures reveals that HIV-associated cardiovascular disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years as more people are living longer with the virus.   The greatest impact is in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia Pacific regions, with Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho particularly ...
Source: University of Warwick  Jul 20, 2018  5 years ago
A clinical trial of the use of adrenaline in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive—but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest. The research raises important questions about the future use of adrenaline in such cases and will necessitate debate amongst healthcare professionals, patients and the...
Source: Multiple  Jul 19, 2018  5 years ago
Introduction High-sensitivity (hs) cardiac troponin (cTn) assays expedite the evaluation of patients with possible acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the emergency department. Rapid screening protocols with hscTn have been proposed for patients for whom ruling-in or ruling-out acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the primary issue. These protocols have not included the entire range of patients w...
Source: University of Tsukuba   Jul 22, 2018  5 years ago
While many candidate citrullinated antigens have been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints, their involvement in blood serum remains mostly uninvestigated. A new study from the University of Tsukuba-centered set out to explore the expression and commonality of citrullinated proteins in peptide glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-induced arthritis (pGIA) and patients with RA. The team also went...

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