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BREAKING NEWS
Source: The National Centre for Cancer Research, US  Dec 04, 2018  4 years ago
Immunotherapy, the strategy for triggering the patient's own immune system to attack cancer, is proving effective for more tumour types, although to varying degrees. In lung cancer, immunotherapy had proven to extend survival rates for only some variants of the disease. Now, an international clinical trial led by the oncologist Luis Paz-Ares has substantially increased the group of lung cancer...
Source: Tuff University  Dec 04, 2018  4 years ago
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features ...
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center  Dec 03, 2018  4 years ago
An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy—to be published on-line Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine (and presented at the ASH annual meeting in San Diego)—found that 52 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy; 40 percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response. One year later, 65 percent percent of those patients w...
Source: University Of Alabama at Birmingham  Dec 02, 2018  4 years ago
Preclinical experiments by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. HPV infections caused an estimated 266,000 deaths from cervical cancer worldwide in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Routine screening by Pap smears or HPV D...
Source: University Of Montreal  Dec 01, 2018  4 years ago
Of the 50 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Canadian scientists think they've found an important clue. TRIM5 Alpha protein Working in collaboration with a team...
Source: University Of Zurich  Nov 30, 2018  4 years ago
Stem cell transplantation is effective against leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue—often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process. Blocking this molecule could significantly improve the outcome of patients receivin...
Source: Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute for Medical Research  Nov 29, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists have uncovered that an emerging gene therapy for Parkinson's disease creates new circuits in the brain associated with improved motor movement. These findings, published today in Science Translational Medicine by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Professor David Eidelberg, MD, and his team, explain the therapeutic mechanisms involved in the emerging Parkinson's ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University Of Medicine  Nov 28, 2018  4 years ago
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells, but show no viral load in blood tests. While based on small numbers, the data suggest that long-term viral remission migh...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center   Nov 27, 2018  4 years ago
A new study has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. If confirmed in humans, they could lead to more effective ways to control certain aggressive types of prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death for men in the world. Men whose  prostrate cancer tumor...
Source: University of Minnesota  Nov 26, 2018  4 years ago
A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body. After targeting the "motors" that generate forces in cancer cells to move, the cancer ce...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Nov 25, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research identified the mechanisms by which the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile kills intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), thus destroying the protective mucosal barrier of the intestinal tract. The researchers demonstrate the physiological relevance of this process during infection and have published their findings in Nature Commu...
Source: American Academy of Neurology  Nov 24, 2018  4 years ago
Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the November 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to researc...
Source: University Of Manchester  Nov 23, 2018  4 years ago
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease. The discovery is a major advance in understanding of the significantly under-diagnosed disorder which, if left undetected, can lead to failing kidneys that need dialysis or kidney transplantation.    The discovery of 35 kidney &n...
Source: Ministry Of Foreign Affairs (Thailand)  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
 On 21 November 2018, the Prince Mahidol Award Foundation under the Royal Patronage (PMAF) held a joint press conference at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, to announce the 27th Prince Mahidol Laureates for 2018 in the field of Medicine and Public Health. Ms. Busadee Santipitaks, Director-General of the Department of Information, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, in the capacity of the ...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer.    The results of the study, which was funded by Cancer Research UK and Worldwide Cancer Research, are published in Nature.   Tumours ...
Society for Endocrinology  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
Cognitive difficulties in patients with diabetes, caused by repeated episodes of low blood sugar, could be reduced with antioxidants, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces cognitive impairments caused by low blood sugar, which could help to improve the qualit...
University Of Queensland  Nov 21, 2018  4 years ago
A world-first clinical trial of a new cellular immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved symptoms and quality of life for the majority of patients. This electron microscopic image of two Epstein Barr Virus virions (viral particles) shows round capsids—protein-encased genetic material—loosely surrounded by the membrane envelope. Credit: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0030430.g...
Source: University Of Leeds   Nov 20, 2018  4 years ago
Both aspirin and a purified omega-3, called EPA, reduce the number of pre-cancerous polyps in patients found to be at high risk of developing bowel cancer, according to new research. A clinical trial, led by the University of Leeds, found that both aspirin and EPA reduced the number of bowel polyps in patients one year on from a screening colonoscopy (large bowel camera test), although they did ...
Source: VIB (The Flanders Institute For Biotechnology)   Nov 19, 2018  4 years ago
Mutations in RAS proteins initiate many of the most aggressive tumors, and the search for pharmacological inhibitors of these proteins has become a priority in the battle against cancer. Michail Steklov, Francesca Baietti, and colleagues from the Anna Sablina lab (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology) identified LZTR1 as an evolutionarily conserved component of the RAS pathway. Multiple ...
Source: British Medical Journal  Nov 19, 2018  4 years ago
Based on results of an observational  study published earlier this week in The BMJ, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, compared with a similar, but distinct type of blood pressure medication known as angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Researchers evaluated patients from a U.K. primary care database and identified ove...
Source: University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy (Kingston)  Nov 18, 2018  4 years ago
Antiepileptic drugs were found to be linked with almost ninefold increased odds for two adverse skin reactions, Steven‐Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, compared with non-AED medication classes in an analysis of adverse-event data from the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy in Kingston, wh...
Source: Canon Medical Systems  Nov 17, 2018  4 years ago
Canon Medical Won FDA clearance to bring to the U.S. market its brand new Vantage Orian 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. It features a wide 71 centimeter bore and quiet operation thanks to its Pianissimo and Pianissimo Zen technologies. Pianissimo makes all scanning sequences quieter, while Pianissimo Zen allows certain scans to be performed at near ambient noise levels. To help young patients and those ...
Source: US FDA  Nov 17, 2018  4 years ago
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved  cemiplimab (Libtayo) for use in patients with locally advanced or metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). This agent is the first to be approved for advanced cSCC and is intended for those who are not eligible for curative surgery or radiation. Researchers reported on the efficacy of cemiplimab in expansion cohorts of a phase I...
Source: Public Library Of Science, US  Nov 16, 2018  4 years ago
Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a study published November 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Steven Yukl of San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues. According to the authors, the findings could inform new therapies aimed at curing HIV. HIV R...
Source: Oregon Health & Science University,Portland  Nov 16, 2018  4 years ago
Results from a phase 3 clinical trial indicate that patients who have not benefited from standard therapy for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by back pain and sacroiliac-joint damage, may have another treatment option in the biologic drug ixekizumab. The findings will be presented at the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting in Chicago (Oct...
Source: Karolinska Institutet  Nov 16, 2018  4 years ago
A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation. The study is published in Science and was done in collaboration with the University of Texas Medical Branch, Uppsala...
Source: Translational Research Center For Medical Innovation, Kobe, Japan  Nov 15, 2018  4 years ago
Blocking amyloid assemble in blood vessels is a promising strategy for slowing dementia. Milk Thistle A component of milk thistle may prevent the deterioration in brain function associated with Alzheimer’s disease by blocking the aggregation of the amyloid-β protein in the brain’s blood vessels.   Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-&b...
Source: TMN Staff Writer  Nov 15, 2018  4 years ago
Yet another blood pressure drug has been recalled because of fears of impurities added by a lab in China. Drug company Sandoz says it has recalled one lot of losartan  potassium hydrochlorothiazide tablets. The impurity, known as NDEA, was found in the drug’s key ingredient made by Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceutical Co. in China. NDEA is found naturally in certain foods, drinking wa...
Source: University Health Network  Nov 15, 2018  4 years ago
Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined "liquid biopsy", epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings, published online today in Nature, describe not only a way to detect cancer,  but hold promise of bei...
Source: Georgetown University Medical Center   Nov 14, 2018  4 years ago
A defining feature of Parkinson's disease is the clumps of alpha-synuclein protein that accumulate in the brain's motor control area, destroying dopamine-producing neurons. Natural processes can't clear these clusters, known as Lewy bodies, and no one has demonstrated how to stop the build up as well as breakdown of the clumps—until perhaps now.   A team of neurologists at...
Source: American Heart Association  Nov 14, 2018  4 years ago
Low-dose rivaroxaban (Xarelto) added to antiplatelet therapy was associated with reduced risk of thromboembolic events in heart failure patients, researchers reported here.   In post hoc analysis of the COMMANDER HF trial, rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) led to a lower composite of thromboembolic events (13.1% vs 15.5%, HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.96) compared with placebo, reported Barry Green...
SOURCE: BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  Nov 13, 2018  4 years ago
Uncovering a novel mechanism that promotes growth of breast cancer bone metastasis has revealed a potential Achilles' heel for these cancer cells. Reported in the journal Cancer Cell, the study shows that interfering with this mechanism can reduce the risk of relapses in animal models. "Metastasis is the dissemination of cancer cells from the original tumor location to other organ...
Source: University Of Minnesota  Nov 13, 2018  4 years ago
Researchers from the University of Minnesota, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the University of Toronto have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis—more commonly known as mono or the "kissing disease"—that infects millions of people around the globe each...
Source: University of Tampere  Nov 12, 2018  4 years ago
Brown spots on skin caused by sun exposure can be removed using medicated creams, a process that may help prevent future cancers. Actinic keratoses – also known as sun spots – are brown or pink scaly marks caused by UV rays. In the past, it’s been possible to have sun spots removed by freezing them off with liquid nitrogen, but the pain associated with this ...
Source: PAREXEL  Nov 12, 2018  4 years ago
After two chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies won FDA approval in 2017 to treat children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and adults with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the American Society of Clinical Oncology hailed CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy as the Advance of the Year.1 Complete remission/response rates in clinical trials for these medicines (both targeting th...
Source: Livescience  Nov 12, 2018  4 years ago
Drinking a cup of tea or eating a handful of berries a day may help protect against heart disease, a new study suggests.     The research, presented here Nov. 10 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions annual meeting, found that daily consumption of small amounts of flavonoids- compounds found in berries, tea, chocolate, wine and many other fruits and plants &...
Source: Yale University  Nov 12, 2018  4 years ago
A drug therapy used for patients with chronic heart failure also improves markers of poor prognosis in individuals who are hospitalized with acute heart failure, new Yale-led research shows. The findings suggest that the drug can improve outcomes for acutely ill heart patients and potentially become the new standard of care for treating this serious condition, the researchers said. The study wa...
Source: Thermo Fisher Scientific  Nov 11, 2018  4 years ago
Biologics have experienced steady double-digit growth over the last 15 years and now comprise slightly more than a quarter of all New Molecular Entity (NME) FDA approvals. Similarly, EvaluatePharma’s 2017 report on orphan drugs projects that by 2020, six of the 10 best-selling global drug therapies will be biologic sterile injectable drugs. Precision medicine is also on the rise, with the FD...
Source: National News Bureau Of Thailand  Nov 11, 2018  4 years ago
The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) is encouraging the general public to live a healthier lifestyle by choosing foods and drinks certified as healthy alternative foods.  Khun Seree Tuchinda,M.D. Seree Tuchinda, chief adviser to the public health minister, revealed the MOPH is campaigning for better food safety following a survey which has found many eating behaviors of the people could po...
Source: NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences(USA)  Nov 11, 2018  4 years ago
The National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded there is clear evidence that male rats exposed to high levels of radio frequency radiation (RFR) like that used in 2G , 3G and 4G cell phones developed cancerous heart tumors, according to final reports released today. There was also some evidence of tumors in the brain and adrenal gland of exposed male rats. For female rats, and male and female mice...
Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  Nov 10, 2018  4 years ago
The management of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV), an autoimmune disorder that cripples the immune system by attacking healthy cells, remains a major global health challenge in developing countries that lack infrastructure and trained medical professionals. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone...
Source: University Of Iowa  Nov 09, 2018  4 years ago
An unexpected finding that links a structural heart protein to gene regulation following heart stress suggests potential new avenues for developing heart failure therapies.   The work led by University of Iowa heart researcher Long-Sheng Song, MD, focuses on a protein called junctophilin-2 (JP2). Previous work from Song's lab has shown that JP2 is a structural protein that is essen...
Source: University of Edinburgh  Nov 08, 2018  4 years ago
A pioneering technique designed to spot differences between immune cells in tumours could speed the development of cancer treatments, research suggests.   Scientists say the approach could be used to help doctors choose the best treatments for individual patients and predict which tumours are likely to respond to a particular therapy. It could help target the use of immunotherapy -- a new ...
Source: Medical University Of South Carolina  Nov 07, 2018  4 years ago
Mitochondria are responsible for supplying the cell with energy in the form of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. There is a group of rare, autosomal recessive disorders, known as Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Syndromes (MTDPS), which causes a significant reduction in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and ATP production. There is no treatment for MTDPS, and it is typically fatal during infancy as a resu...
Source: World Medical Centre  Nov 06, 2018  4 years ago
World Medical Hospital recently organized A Health Market; “WMC Healthy Market 2018” at its premises which ran from the 2nd to 4th  of November . The market featured a variety of booths and vendors from various aspects of the health industry and was well received by both visitors and patients at its hospital.
Source: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute  Nov 06, 2018  4 years ago
Australian researchers have uncovered clues in the immune system that reveal how the balance of 'good' gut bacteria is maintained. This information could help in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, showed that the increased presence of a protein responsible for sensing infection -- called NLRP1 --...
Source: American College of Cardiology  Nov 06, 2018  4 years ago
Women using hormone replacement therapy to relieve the symptoms of menopause faced a lower risk of death and showed lower levels of atherosclerosis, or plaque buildup in the heart's arteries, compared to women not using hormone therapy, according to a single-center study scheduled for presentation at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session. Hormone replacemen...
Source: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology  Nov 06, 2018  4 years ago
New research identifies potential therapeutic intervention for memory impairment, neuroinflammation, and brain insulin resistance induced by high-fat, high-fructose diet     A study published online in The FASEB Journal, involving mice, suggests that EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate), the most abundant catechin and biologically active component in green tea, could alleviate high-fa...
Source: University Of Connecticut  Nov 06, 2018  4 years ago
Despite efforts to eradicate it, syphilis is on the rise. Until now, most health agencies focused on treating infected people and their sex partners but new discoveries may make a vaccine possible. Syphilis Bacteria The World Health Organization estimates that 40.7 million people between the ages of 15 and 49 had syphilis in 2017, and about 7.6 million people contract it every year. In the U.S....
Source: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center  Nov 06, 2018  4 years ago
Study points to possible way to predict increased inflammation risk   With an estimated 40 million people in the world dealing with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), physicians can have a hard time telling which newly diagnosed patients have a high risk of severe inflammation or what therapies will be most effective. Now researchers report in the journal JCI Insights finding an ep...
Source: Roche  Nov 05, 2018  4 years ago
 • The phase III CLL14 study compared Venclexta/Venclyxto in combination with Gazyva/Gazyvaro to standard-of-care Gazyva/Gazyvaro plus chlorambucil  • Data will be submitted to health authorities and presented at an upcoming medical meeting     Basel, 1 November 2018 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced today that the randomised phase III CLL14 study, whi...
Source: University of Missouri-Columbia  Nov 05, 2018  4 years ago
In a first study of its kind study, researchers have found that a common chemical consumers are exposed to several times a day may be altering insulin release. Results of the study, led by scientists at the University of Missouri, indicate that the Food and Drug Administration-approved "safe" daily exposure amount of BPA may be enough to have implications for the development of Type 2 di...
Source: University of Sheffield  Nov 04, 2018  4 years ago
Vitamin D supplements could help to ease painful Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) symptoms, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found. Scientists from the University's Department of Oncology and Metabolism reviewed and integrated all available research on vitamin D and IBS -- a condition which affects two in 10 people in the UK. The study showed a high prevalence of vitamin D def...
Source: Krembil Research Institute  Nov 03, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists at the Krembil Research Institute have developed a novel therapeutic treatment that has the potential to stop knee and spine osteoarthritis in its tracks.   A team led by Principal Investigator Dr. Mohit Kapoor, Arthritis Research Director at UHN, published the results today in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases in a paper titled "microRNA-181a-5p antisense oligonu...
National News Bureau Thailand  Nov 03, 2018  4 years ago
The many tourists who enjoy winter's cool breezes should beware of malaria and typhus, especially those who like to pitch their tents in the great outdoors.    Typhus Dr. Surachai Chokekanchitchai, the Director of Uthai Thani Hospital, recently noted that tourists pitching tents in the woods run the risk of getting bitten by mosquitoes, which in Thailand can include anopheles mo...

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