We Need Your Urgent Help To Sustain This Website And All Our Research And Community Initiatives. Please Help By Donating To Our Cause. Go To The Sponsorship Section.

BREAKING NEWS
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Jan 06, 2019  3 years ago
Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells. In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol...
Source: University Of Bergen  Jan 05, 2019  3 years ago
Diabetes is caused by damaged or non-existing insulin cells inability to produce insulin, a hormone that is necessary in regulating blood sugar levels. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels. In collaboration with other international researchers, researchers at the University of Bergen have, discovered that glucagon.producing cells in the pancreas, can change i...
Source: Princeton University  Jan 04, 2019  3 years ago
By simultaneously tackling two mechanisms for cancer's growth, an experimental therapy reduced the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in a study conducted in mice. The therapeutic agent, called Tinagl1, is based on a naturally occurring protein and blocks two of the main pathways by which breast cancer cells can grow and migrate out of the primary tumor to spread to other organs in the b...
TMN  Jan 03, 2019  3 years ago
The health care industry is subject to a wide range of laws and regulations, including those related to healthcare reimbursement, social security, hospital, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and laws regulating the practices of medical professionals.     The National Health Act B.E. 2550 (2007) is considered the principal healthcare law in Thailand. The Act codifies important rights a...
Medical Spheres Inc  Jan 03, 2019  3 years ago
Medical Spheres Announces the set up of a new subsidiary business unit: Med5G Inc with its registered offices at 244 Madison Avenue, 10016-2817 New York City, NY, USA and its Thailand branch: Med5G Co Ltd  with offices at 907/854, Moo 9, Chaengwattana Road, Pakred, Nonthaburi 11120, Thailand. Med5g is a full spectrum Medical and Healthcare orientated  IT and Software Development entity ...
Source: Oregon State University  Jan 03, 2019  3 years ago
A research study at Oregon State University has shown that a higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems. Metabolic syndrome affects more than 30 percent of the global adult population and this findings might provide some relief to a majority of them. "What these finding...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 02, 2019  3 years ago
Unfortunately, we do not recommend touching any Thai stocks or even Asian stocks at the moment considering the strong volatility plus pessimistic outlook for Thailand and the region. Furthermore, considering many political uncertainities in Thailand, its best to stay clear on investing in the Thailand SET for the time being.. The US however, still possess many lucrative and interesting deals. &n...
Source: University Of California -Berkeley  Jan 02, 2019  3 years ago
A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's. In a proposed device, two of the new chips would be embedded in a chassis located outside the head. Each chip could monitor ele...
EKF Diagnostics  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Diabetes, also known as diabetes mellitus, is a common metabolic disease that is characterized by frequent sessions of uncontrolled high blood sugar or hyperglycaemia caused by poor insulin production or increased resistance to insulin. The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that 8.5% of the global population was affected by diabetes in 2014, or roughly 422 million people.1 Diabetes is ...
Source: Joseph O' Connor and Son Nguyen (Thai Examiner.Com)  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
New move could be bad news for many middle aged foreigners and particularly elderly individuals who have been unable to get health insurance coverage before. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many are in this category with a range of health conditions including diabetes, heart complaints and even cancer. While the proposal has yet to be fully clarified and presented to the Thai cabinet, the concern...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A hospital in Thailand facing a shortage of nurses has turned to robots to fill the void. With a recent heavy influx of new patients, The Mongkutwattana General Hospital in Bangkok can’t find enough qualified human staff to keep up with demand. They have recently hired three robot nurses and even dressed them in the hospital’s yellow uniform.   The robot nur...
Source: Mayo Clinic  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips.   When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweigh...
AstraZeneca  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
AstraZeneca announced a new collaboration with Cancer Research UK to launch a centre of excellence in genetic screening, cancer modelling and big data processing aimed at accelerating the discovery of new cancer medicines.   The Functional Genomics Centre will further develop CRISPR technology to better understand the biology of cancer, creating biological models that may be more reflect...
Samitivej Hospitals  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Adinun Kittiratanapaibool,M.D.,  Director of Samitivej Srinakarin Hospital recently launch an event  “Don’t Mind Age, Live Life to the Fullest”  at its hospital premises .The event was aimed at showing propective patients that the hospital has repositioned itself to cater for the greying elderly market both in terms of its services and also facilities. The vent kic...
Source: Teva Pharmaceuticals  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
The FDA has approved the first inhaler with built-in monitoring sensors to track medication adherence for asthma and COPD patients, according to Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. The ProAir Digihaler (albuterol sulfate 117 mcg) inhalation powder is equipped with built-in sensors that connect via Bluetooth to a companion mobile application, which stores data. Teva's &nbs...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels. According to a recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, magnesium may help in maintaining optimum vitamin D levels in the body. The randomised study that had 250...
Source: University Of South Australia  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
One of the biggest health issues could be checked if more people took up yoga or tai chi and reduced their blood pressure, an Australian study has found. Stroke costs the world $120 billion a year through treatment and loss of productivity, affecting 2.6 million people in  2017. A paper published in Future Neurology by researchers from Monash University, the University of South ...
Source: University of Groningen  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A team of researchers with members from the Netherlands and the U.S. has found differences in the numbers of gut microbes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine the group describes how they sequenced the genome of gut microbes in patients with bowel problems and what they found. ...
Source: Texas A&M University  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A recent study led by researchers in Texas A&M University's department of nutrition and food science shows how a novel regulatory mechanism serves as an important biomarker for the development of diabetes, as well as a potential therapeutic target for its prevention. The study can be found online in the November edition of the diabetes journal of the American Diabetes Associati...
Source: Johns Hopkins University   Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A new test for chlamydia can provide results within 30 minutes, potentially speeding up the start of treatment, researchers say.   The rapid test for the sexually transmitted disease means patients can receive treatment immediately, instead of having to wait for a follow-up appointment. This could help reduce the spread of the disease, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins Universit...
Source: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center   Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
An investigational oral antibiotic called zoliflodacin was well-tolerated and successfully cured most cases of uncomplicated gonorrhea when tested in a Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial, according to findings published  in the New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, sponsored the ...
Source: Pasteur Institute  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus – it is their metabolic (or energy-producing) activity1 that enables the virus to multiply. Thanks to met...
Source: University of Michigan  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries. "We've known for a long time that esophageal adenocarcinoma primarily affects Caucasians and ver...
Source: Staff Writer, Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Firibastat By Quantum Genomics is an oral antihypertensive drug that has proved  to be safe and effective and well-tolerated  in  the NEW-HOPE, a phase 2b clinical trial focused on an understudied and underserved patient population composed largely of overweight or obese, high-risk, hypertensive racial minorities. Firibastat is the first brain aminopeptidase A inhibitor. It selec...
Source: Medical University of Vienna  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A type of glycoproteins ie carbohydrate binding proteins, called galectins, plays an important role in the degeneration of cartilage in osteoarthritis. A research group at the Medical University of Vienna was able to demonstrate this correlation, in cooperation with international study partners. In osteoarthritis, certain galectins are produced by the cartilage cells themselves and accelerate the ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
A company is in Houston, Texas is introducing new acoustic shockwave technology for quicker laser tattoo removal. What’s more, the new device also shows potential in aesthetics market for cellulite and fat removal. The patented Rapid Acoustic Pulse (RAP) device by Soliton Inc, uses acoustic shockwaves that accelerated the speed of tattoo removal when used with lasers, delivering results i...
Source: University of California San Diego  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Dermal fibroblasts are specialized cells deep in the skin that generate connective tissue and help the skin recover from injury. Some fibroblasts have the ability to convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving the skin a plump, youthful look and producing a peptide that plays a critical role in fighting infections. Studies by the University of California San Diego School of Medic...
Source: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists have created a cheaper, faster, reproducible diagnostic technique that has the potential to predict the risk of metastasis in prostate cancer.   For patients who are newly diagnosed, or patients previously treated, the risk of metastasis in prostrate cancer  is a crucial factor of whether to choose conservative management or undergo further treatment. For prostate as we...
Source: University Of Zurich  Jan 01, 2019  3 years ago
Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease of the lung, for which there is currently no cure. The underlying cause of the disease is a malfunction of the chloride channel CFTR, which prevents the secretion of chloride in certain body cells. This leads to dehydration of the mucus layer in the lung. A promising approach for treating cystic fibrosis is the activation of the calcium-activated chlo...
Source: Cleveland Clinic  Dec 31, 2018  3 years ago
Cleveland Clinic researchers have shown, for the first time in humans, that choline is directly linked to increased production of a gut bacteria byproduct that increases the risk of blood-clotting events like heart attack and stroke. However, the research also showed that adding a low dose of aspirin may reduce that risk. In a small interventional study, the researchers provided oral choline, s...
Source: Osaka University  Dec 30, 2018  3 years ago
A team of researchers led by Osaka University examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli (CR-E) in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent. This Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a non-pathogenic bacterium, so the residents have no symptom...
Source: Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine  Dec 29, 2018  3 years ago
The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance—which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure—from natural dietary fiber. "You are what you eat," as the proverb goes. But to a large extent our well-being also dep...
Source: University of Southern California  Dec 28, 2018  3 years ago
A new study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers shows there's yet another reason to avoid a high fat, high cholesterol diet: It can trigger changes in the immune system that lead to a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States, and an estimated 2...
Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 27, 2018  3 years ago
A new study has found that genes cause about 1 in 10 cases of chronic kidney disease in adults, and that identifying the responsible genes has a direct impact on treatment for most of these patients.  “Our study shows that genetic testing can be used to personalize the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, and that nephrologists should consider incorporating it into the diagnost...
Source: University Of Toronto  Dec 26, 2018  3 years ago
Letrozole was found to damage normal function in the hippocampus of monkeys The animals also showed anxiety and hot flashes after four weeks of treatment Side effects like fatigue are experienced by up to 30% of women on the drug   A drug commonly given out  to breast-cancer patients may affect their brain function and memory, research suggests.Letrozole is primarily used to treat b...
Source: Dallas Morning News (Anna Kuchment)  Dec 25, 2018  3 years ago
Medical researchers fear that more children will develop paralysis from a mysterious polio like illness that has struck every two years since 2014. The condition, known as acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, is rare and has reached its peak for 2018. It will likely continue to fade as winter approaches. But many believe it will be back.   D68 Enterovirus "AFM is here, and it doesn't se...
Source: University of Bristol  Dec 24, 2018  3 years ago
Scientists have identified a growth factor found in the kidneys that could minimise the diabetes-inducing effects of blood vessel damage. The research, led by experts in renal disease and translational health sciences from the University of Bristol  focused on a group of growth factors categorised as VEGFs, or vascular endothelial growth factors. These are growth factors produced by...
Source: University Of Virginia School Of Medicine  Dec 23, 2018  3 years ago
A group of genes called SLCs that has been largely ignored by scientists could play critical roles in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), inflammation, and likely obesity and other metabolic diseases, new research suggests.The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in the context of how our bodies recognize and remove dying cells. SLC Gene &nb...
Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital  Dec 22, 2018  3 years ago
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a subset of helper T cells that may help to redefine understanding and treatment of chronic, debilitating inflammatory disorders. The study focused on a family of helper T cells called Th17 cells. Th17 cells help to launch the immune response against fungal infection and other threats. These cells can also fuel the destructive i...
Source: Yale University  Dec 21, 2018  3 years ago
In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell. Researchers around the world have been racing to create therapies that unleash th...
Source: Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 20, 2018  3 years ago
In a phase three clinical trial, a drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for two years in 80 percent of patients who completed treatment, a significant increase in progression-free survival compared with placebo. (Progression-free survival is the length of time a patient lives without worsening of the disease). There is no standard of care for patients with desmo...
Source: University Of Virginia  Dec 19, 2018  3 years ago
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have made a discovery about human papillomavirus (HPV) that could lead to new treatments for cervical cancer and other cancers caused by the virus. HPV is responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer and 95 percent of anal cancers. It is the most common sexually transmitted disease, infecting more than 600 million people glo...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center  Dec 18, 2018  3 years ago
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice. Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke. Blood pressur...
Source: University Of Tasmania  Dec 17, 2018  3 years ago
Diabetes has been tied to a number of complications such as kidney disease, but new research has found that older people with type 2 diabetes can also have more difficulties with thinking and memory.   During a five-year study, participants with diabetes showed a decline in verbal memory and fluency. Using MRI scans, researchers saw that the participants' brains were smaller at the star...
Source: Newcastle University  Dec 16, 2018  3 years ago
Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates. In the largest study of its kind, researchers at Newcastle University, UK, have led national research into the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed myeloma.   The results, published online today by The Lancet Oncolo...
Source: Rutgers University  Dec 15, 2018  3 years ago
Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. A team of Rutgers scientists, including Leonard Lee and Shaohua Li, have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce ...
Source: Harvard Medical School  Dec 14, 2018  3 years ago
The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led by investigators at Harvard Medical School suggests that weakened metabolism of immune T cells may be p...
Source: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc   Dec 13, 2018  3 years ago
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. Further, in HIV-infected men with virologic suppression testosterone was significantly associated with a higher BMD score at the lumbar spine, as reported in AID...
Source: Thai PBS World  Dec 13, 2018  3 years ago
Vegetables and fruits found in lunches for students under the government-sponsored lunch programme are almost 100 percent contaminated with pesticides and 99 percent of the urine samples from students and teachers in four provinces were tested with organophosphate, a deadly toxic pesticide that attacks nervous system. The above alarming findings were the result of a research jointly conducted by...
Source: University of Basel  Dec 13, 2018  3 years ago
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. The widely used...
Source: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil  Dec 12, 2018  3 years ago
Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed that a natural flavonoid is effective at treating Leishmania amazonensis infections. Leishmaniasis is endemic to 98 countries and affect...
Source: University of Glasgow  Dec 11, 2018  3 years ago
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for a transplant, dialysis is a life-saving treatment. New research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in the Journal Ame...
Source: TMN  Dec 10, 2018  3 years ago
 CAP or Community-acquired pneumonia disproportionately affects older people, with high rates of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Although pneumococcal vaccines are routinely recommended for this population, fewer than 40% of adults age 60 and older get vaccinated. Thus, antibiotics are key to treating CAP in the elderly—and the earlier that antibiotic therapy starts, the bett...
Source: University of Birmingham  Dec 09, 2018  3 years ago
The  large scale systematic review published in The Cochrane Library as part of a Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews bringing together a vast  body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer. The suite of eleven reviews was led by Dr Jac Dinnes at the University of Birmingham and supported by the Cochrane Skin Group and a team of over 30 researc...
Source: Northwestern University  Dec 08, 2018  3 years ago
An extensive study from Northwestern Medicine psanning over two decades,  reports that Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA  (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk o...

MOST READ

Feb 05, 2020  2 years ago
Source : Thailand Medical news

Interesting Reads

Source: COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma and Hyperimmune Plasma Or H-Ig Therapies
Jun 15, 2020  2 years ago
Source: Nitric Oxide and COVID-19
Jun 15, 2020  2 years ago
Source: COVID-19 Asymptomatic and Presymptomatic
Jun 14, 2020  2 years ago
Source: COVID-19 Long-Term Health Implications
Jun 13, 2020  2 years ago
Source: COVID-19, Influenza and Next Wave
Jun 10, 2020  2 years ago
Source: Myocardial Injury
Jun 09, 2020  2 years ago
Source: COVID-19 News
May 21, 2020  2 years ago
Source: Covid-19 Treatments And Drugs News
Mar 20, 2020  2 years ago
Source: SARS-Cov-2 Coronavirus Research
Mar 08, 2020  2 years ago
Source : Thailand Medical News
Feb 11, 2020  2 years ago