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BREAKING NEWS
Source: Thailand Medical News  Apr 02, 2019  3 years ago
Siriraj Hospital in Thailand, lead by Dr Vuthinun Achariyapota announced at the recent Society Of Gynecologic Cancers (SGO) Annual Meeting 2019 in Hawaii of a new novel approach of detecting HPV via urine samples. HPV Virus   The group from Siriraj Hospital initially conducted a study from a sample size of about 96 women. In the study, two methods of detecting high-grade squamous intraepit...
Source: Brigham and Women's Hospital  Apr 02, 2019  3 years ago
Food allergies, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diarrhea and other gastrointestinal diseases have something in common: all have been linked to epithelial barrier loss. The gut epithelial barrier—that critical lining of cells in the gut that must allow nutrients into the body while keeping food-borne microbes out—can be compromised during intestinal inflammation and ca...
Source: France’s Institut Cochin, Paris   Apr 01, 2019  3 years ago
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in France has found that a class of antipsychotic drugs known as phenothiazines was successful in treating a form of meningitis in mice when used with antibacterial agents. In their paper published in the journal Nature Microbiology, the group describes experiments they conducted with meningitis mouse models and what they found. Me...
www.medtecchina.com   Mar 31, 2019  3 years ago
SHANGHAI - Following the growth in its scale by 17% last year, Medtec China 2019 has continued its upward momentum trend in terms of the area of exhibition booths commercially available, which has increased by 25%. The overall scale of the event, meanwhile, is up by 21%. So far, the number of new exhibitors, according to the most recent data, has risen to 53. Further, 10 suppliers from New York, U...
Source: University Of California, Santa Barbara  Mar 31, 2019  3 years ago
Dementia — an umbrella term for various neurodegenerative conditions involving memory loss and other forms of cognitive impairment — is hard to treat because its causes remain unknown. Researchers, however, are making painstaking progress.   Dr. Kenneth Kosik, the Harriman Professor of Neuroscience at the University of California (UC), Santa Barbara recently led a team of exper...
Thailand Medical News  Mar 30, 2019  3 years ago
UPDATE: 31s March 2020: An Urgent Appeal: Please help support this website and also our initiatives in propelling research and developments by making a donation via paypal. Your gestures are greatly appreciated. https://www.thailandmedical.news/p/sponsorship Lemongrass, is an herb which belongs to the grass family of Poaceae,1 and is also known as Cymbopogon citratus. It is utilized for its...
Source: American Thoracic Society  Mar 30, 2019  3 years ago
Dietary intake of two fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6, may have opposite effects on the severity of asthma in children and may also play opposite roles in modifying their response to indoor air pollution, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. In "Omega-3 and Omega-6 Intake Modifies ...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Mar 29, 2019  3 years ago
A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.   The investigators found that in addition to its known ability to block the production of cell growth compounds, the drug DFMO (difluoromethylornithine, known also as Eflornithine and...
Source: American Academy Of Neurology  Mar 28, 2019  3 years ago
Women who start their period later, go through menopause earlier or have a hysterectomy may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study by the American Academy of Neurology. The study found a link between increased risk of dementia and fewer total reproductive years when women are exposed to higher levels of estrogen hormones.   "Since women are 50 percent more...
Source: University of California, Los Angeles  Mar 27, 2019  3 years ago
More than half of the people in the world host colonies of a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori in their stomachs. Although it's harmless to many, H. pylori can cause stomach cancer as well as ulcers and other gastric conditions. Doctors tend to prescribe multiple antibiotics to defeat the microbe, but that strategy can lead to antibiotic-resistant superbugs. Now, a finding by UCLA scient...
Source: Boston University School of Medicine  Mar 26, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers have identified a biomarker and a possible new therapy for melanoma.   Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a protein that plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the melanocyte ( cells that make melanin) lineage, differentiation of normal and malignant melanocytes and the survival of melanoma cells.   "We have now detected the first useful chemi...
Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center  Mar 25, 2019  3 years ago
UT Southwestern researchers have identified two proteins that act as gatekeepers to dampen a potentially life-threatening immune response to chronic infection. The proteins -- the transcription factors SIX1 and SIX2 -- activate cellular pathways required for fetal development and later switch to a new role in which they repress these pathways in adult immune system cells.  "This work...
Source: Proceedings From ENDO 2019, Endocrine Society Annula Meeting in new Orleans, LA.  Mar 24, 2019  3 years ago
Using the hemoglobin A1c blood test to diagnose diabetes tends to underestimate the prevalence of the disease, according to a new study  presented on Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.   "Based on our findings, A1c should not be solely used to determine the prevalence of diabetes," said lead researcher Maria Me...
Source: Mayo Clinic  Mar 23, 2019  3 years ago
Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers.  While therapies have been available to treat some forms of liver disease, including hepatitis C and autoimmune hepatitis, options have been more limited for treating portal hypertension, a conditio...
Source: Baylor College of Medicine  Mar 22, 2019  3 years ago
Does sugar directly feed cancers, boosting their growth? The answer seems to be 'Yes' at least in mice according to a study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medicine. Their study showed that consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup -- the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily -- accelerates the...
Source: University Of Massachusetts  Mar 21, 2019  3 years ago
Brazilian researchers have discovered that a drug regularly prescribed to control cholesterol can also be used to treat cachexia, or wasting syndrome, a condition characterized by rapid weight loss and muscle atrophy associated with extreme physical weakness. This condition is common among patients with chronic diseases such as cancer, heart failure and AIDS.   "Our goal is to underst...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Mar 20, 2019  3 years ago
Noninvasive treatment improves memory and reduces amyloid plaques. By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.     This noninvasive treatment, which works by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations, also greatly reduced the n...
Source: UB School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  Mar 19, 2019  3 years ago
Common medications prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and ulcers are linked to increased risks for kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, found a recent University at Buffalo study. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), a group of drugs that reduce the production of stomach acid, increases the risk of chronic kidney disease by 20 percent and raises the risk of kidney f...
Source: Intermountain Medical Center,US  Mar 18, 2019  3 years ago
About six million people come into an emergency department every year with chest pain, but not all of them are having a heart attack -- and many are not even at risk or are at very low risk for having one. Now, a new research study presented at the American College Cardiology Scientific Sessions from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that identifying the prese...
Source: George Washington University  Mar 17, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center found that the enzyme USP15 could potentially lead to new treatments for breast and pancreatic cancer. Their findings were published in Nature Communications. "With this study, we validate the role of USP15 in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression and inform novel treatments for breast cancer," said H...
Source: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  Mar 16, 2019  3 years ago
Fewer than half of ovarian cancer patients survive until five years after diagnosis. According to the American Cancer Society, this is because only about one-fifth of ovarian cancer cases are detected early, when the chances of successful treatment and recovery are highest.   "If we could change this reality by detecting ovarian cancer at a curable stage, we could save many lives,"...
Source: University of British Columbia  Mar 15, 2019  3 years ago
A new treatment for a common type of stroke may soon be possible, thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia. In a study published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers successfully used a new approach that significantly minimized brain damage caused by stroke in mouse models. The new approach works by target...
Source: British Medical Journal  Mar 14, 2019  3 years ago
The blood test used to diagnose a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) in patients admitted to hospital can be misleading, warn researchers in a study published by The BMJ. Of 20,000 consecutive patients undergoing blood tests at University Hospital Southampton, one in 20 had levels of troponin (a protein released into the bloodstream during a heart attack) greater than the manu...
Source: Duke University  Mar 13, 2019  3 years ago
A vaccine developed by Duke Cancer Institute researchers has shown early promise in targeting the HER2 protein that fuels a deadly form of breast cancer.   In a phase 1 clinical trial that enrolled 22 women with recurrent cancers that overexpress the HER2 protein, the vaccine demonstrated an ability to halt tumor growth and improve survival for a subset of patients. A phase 2 trial is b...
Source: Duke University Medical Center  Mar 12, 2019  3 years ago
A quick eye exam might one day allow eye doctors to check up on both your eyeglasses prescription and your brain health.   A study of more than 200 people at the Duke Eye Center publishing March 11 in the journal Ophthalmology Retina suggests the loss of blood vessels in the retina could signal Alzheimer's disease.   In people with healthy brains, microscopic bl...
Source: Allergan  Mar 11, 2019  3 years ago
- Ubrogepant Seeks to be the First Oral Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) Receptor Antagonist for the Acute Treatment of Migraine - - Allergan Continues to Expand Its Leading Migraine Portfolio Across the Spectrum of the Disease from Episodic to Chronic –   March 11, 2019  Allergan plc (NYSE: AGN) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ha...
Source: Ionicon Analytik Ges.m.b.H.  Mar 11, 2019  3 years ago
Over the last few years, a developing field of research has emerged in breath gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This technique is non-invasive and has a number of possible applications, including monitoring of metabolic processes, study of pharmacokinetics, screening for disease biomarkers and drug testing. Advantages of IONICON PTR-TOFMS The detection limits and linearity rang...
Source: American College Of Cardiology  Mar 11, 2019  3 years ago
There's now another reason to get your yearly flu shot. Not only can it protect you from the body aches, fever and fatigue associated with a bout of influenza, it may even prevent you from having a heart attack, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. The study of nearly 30 million hospital records shows that people who ...
Source: Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2019) ,Seattle.  Mar 10, 2019  3 years ago
A combination of two long-acting injectable anti-HIV drugs taken once monthly had a very low rate of treatment failure and a favourable safety profile, according to results from two phase III trials presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2019) in Seattle.    Dual injections of cabotegravir, an experimental integrase inhibitor, and the no...
Source: Institute of Cancer Research, London  Mar 10, 2019  3 years ago
Precision cancer drugs called PARP inhibitors have a previously unknown ability to boost the immune system, and could help many more patients benefit from immunotherapy, a new study reveals. Scientists found that PARP inhibitors sparked a powerful immune response when used against cancer cells with weaknesses in repairing their DNA.   The study changes our understanding of how PARP inhibito...
Source: Columbia University, Irving Medical Center   Mar 10, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine have determined how F. nucleatum-- a common oral bacteria often implicated in tooth decay -- accelerates the growth of colon cancer.  The findings could make it easier to identify and treat more aggressive colon cancers. It also helps explain why some cases advance far more quickly than others, thanks to the same bacter...
Source: University Of Queensland  Mar 09, 2019  3 years ago
New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs).   UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide with about 150 million cases each year, and can lead to serious conditions such as kidney infection and sepsis. A team of cross-instit...
Source: Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America  Mar 08, 2019  3 years ago
Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Clostridioides d...
Source: University of Southern California  Mar 07, 2019  3 years ago
A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say. Researchers emphasize that the study, recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, was in mice, and many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments. Nevertheless, the findings lend credence to...
Source: Samitivej Hospitals  Mar 06, 2019  3 years ago
Samitivej Reaffirms Its Leadership in Mobile Health Innovations Samitivej is expanding its innovative mobile health services, based on the hospital’s deep understanding of patient needs. Samitivej Mobile Health offers Samitivej Plus app, Line@Samitivej and Samitivej PACE to improve the patient experience. Mobile Health is now also offering Ward Tracking application to assist patients in pre...
Source: University of Southern California  Mar 06, 2019  3 years ago
USC researchers provided evidence that a low-calorie "fasting-mimicking" diet has the potential to reduce inflammation and repair the gut. Published in a recent  edition of Cell Reports, the study reports on the health benefits of periodic cycles of the diet for people with inflammation and indicated that the diet reversed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patholo...
Source: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore  Mar 05, 2019  3 years ago
Many Americans take a daily low-dose aspirin to protect their hearts. Now it appears aspirin may also reduce flare-ups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a study of COPD sufferers, researchers found that aspirin was linked to fewer moderate exacerbations, but not severe bouts, of the lung disease. It also reduced moderate and severe episodes of labored breathing. ...
Source: University of Luxembourg  Mar 04, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalised stem cells improve the regeneration of injured or diseased areas in the brain of old mice. The researchers expect that their approach will provide fresh impetus in r...
Source: Alphatec Inc, California  Mar 03, 2019  3 years ago
Alphatec Inc based in California, recently obtained  US FDA clearance for the SafeOp automated neuromonitoring system for use in real-time intraoperative nerve location and assessment. The system relies on somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and and electromyography (EMG) as the two complementary modalities, one for evaluating the functionality of nerves and the other their locati...
Source: AstraZeneca  Mar 03, 2019  3 years ago
AstraZeneca and MSD have announced positive results from the Phase III POLO trial, in which there was a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with Lynparza (olaparib) for pancreatic cancer, making it the first PARP inhibitor to demonstrate benefit in the disease. The drug is a first-in-class PARP inhibitor, and the first targeted treat...
Source: Tufts University  Mar 03, 2019  3 years ago
The World Cancer Research Fund reports that 30 to 50 percent of cancer cases are preventable, and it is important to focus on stopping cancer from developing in the first place. Many natural foods contain a variety of antioxidants and phytochemicals that possess the capability of preventing cancer from developing coupled with a proper lifestyle. Xiang-Dong Wang, a senior scientist and associate...
Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham  Mar 02, 2019  3 years ago
In a paper recently published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, researchers examined the effect of vaginal tenofovir 1 percent gel use on the risk of acquiring herpes simplex virus type 2, or HSV-2. The study was conducted through a secondary analysis of data from the VOICE study. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one in six Americans ages 14 to 49 ...
Source: University of Pittsburgh  Mar 01, 2019  3 years ago
A single misbehaving protein -- called TDP-43 -- is behind 97 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and 45 percent of frontotemporal dementia diagnoses. It also is found in 80 percent of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and 60 percent of Alzheimer's disease cases. Now, University of Pittsburgh researchers have found a way to trap TDP-43 so it doesn't form toxic clumps that c...
Source: University of Michigan  Feb 28, 2019  3 years ago
A protein molecule called EZH2,  known to play a role in cancer may also be increasing fibrosis in scleroderma patients.   Studies and researches that have been made show that Scleroderma, a rare chronic autoimmune disease, causes difficulties during breathing, exhaustion and most concerningly hardens the internal organs and the skin. “Tissues and organs are damaged due to...
Source: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia  Feb 27, 2019  3 years ago
New preclinical findings from extensive cell and animal studies suggest that a drug already used for a rare kidney disease could benefit patients with some mitochondrial disorders -- complex conditions with severe energy deficiency for which no proven effective treatments exist. Future clinical research is needed to explore whether the drug, cysteamine bitartrate, will meaningfully benefit patient...
Source: Indiana University, US  Feb 26, 2019  3 years ago
A breakthrough test developed by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers to measure pain in patients could help stem the tide of the opioid crisis in Indiana, and throughout the rest of the nation. A study led by psychiatry professor Alexander Niculescu, MD, PhD and published this week in the Nature journal Molecular Psychiatrytracked hundreds of participants at the Richard L. Ro...
Source: University of Virginia Health System  Feb 25, 2019  3 years ago
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition. The pr...
Source: Vanderbilt University  Feb 24, 2019  3 years ago
A well-known, four-year study found popular arthritis drug Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs in its same classification - commonly called NSAIDs. Now, a big-data analysis of patient records at Vanderbilt University has found a link specifically between Celebrex and heart valve calcification. W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering, and Ph.D. student Megan B...
Source: Rutgers University  Feb 24, 2019  3 years ago
A Rutgers study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. The study, which was published in the journal Nature Communications, identified the NSD2 gene through a computer algorithm developed to determine which cancergenes that spread in a&nb...
Source: Vanderbilt University  Feb 23, 2019  3 years ago
Verticilide, an extract from the genus of fungus Verticillium, commonly found on plants and insects, is a promising compound to treat arrhythmia according to a research from a collaboration between Vanderbilt University professors of chemistry and medicine. Jeffrey Johnston, Stevenson Professor of Chemistry, said the natural product isn't active except in insects, but the synthetic mirror-i...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 22, 2019  3 years ago
We continue our series of stock recommendations, still focusing on Medical and Biotech stocks in the US, as considering the political uncertainties facing Thailand, its best to stay clear of the Thailand Stock Market for the rest of the year. Medical and Biotechnology  stocks are  simultaneously one of the most exciting and one of the riskiest corners of the stock market. Biotech co...
Source: University of California - Riverside  Feb 22, 2019  3 years ago
Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. This debilitating condition periodically shutters communication between the brain and other parts of the body, resulting in symptoms that range from numbness and tingling in the arms and legs to blindness and paralysis. While treatments are available to alleviate inflammation, no therapies exist to pro...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 21, 2019  3 years ago
Doctors In Thailand practicing primary care medicine in 2019 have likely met this familiar greeting from a patient: “I Googled my symptoms and I think the problem is [insert condition].” Obviously, this can be unsettling for many providers – doctors in the past were often the first point of reference for patients who otherwise had no way of researching their health concerns on th...
Source: San Diego School Of Medicine  Feb 20, 2019  3 years ago
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which include well-known brand names Prilosec, Miracid, Nexium and Prevacid, are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the world. Approximately 10 percent of adults in the United States take these drugs for frequent heartburn, acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Given their prevalence, researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutic...
Source: University Of Melbourne  Feb 19, 2019  3 years ago
Scientists from the University Of Melbourne said  on Monday that they had discovered immune cells that can fight all known flu viruses in what was hailed as an "extraordinary breakthrough" that could lead to a universal, one-shot vaccine against the killer disease. Influenza epidemics, largely seasonal, kill hundreds of thousands of people each year, according to the World Health ...

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