BREAKING NEWS
Source: University of Southern California  Dec 28, 2018  3 years ago
A new study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers shows there's yet another reason to avoid a high fat, high cholesterol diet: It can trigger changes in the immune system that lead to a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States, and an estimated 2...
Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 27, 2018  3 years ago
A new study has found that genes cause about 1 in 10 cases of chronic kidney disease in adults, and that identifying the responsible genes has a direct impact on treatment for most of these patients.  “Our study shows that genetic testing can be used to personalize the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, and that nephrologists should consider incorporating it into the diagnost...
Source: University Of Toronto  Dec 26, 2018  3 years ago
Letrozole was found to damage normal function in the hippocampus of monkeys The animals also showed anxiety and hot flashes after four weeks of treatment Side effects like fatigue are experienced by up to 30% of women on the drug   A drug commonly given out  to breast-cancer patients may affect their brain function and memory, research suggests.Letrozole is primarily used to treat b...
Source: Dallas Morning News (Anna Kuchment)  Dec 25, 2018  3 years ago
Medical researchers fear that more children will develop paralysis from a mysterious polio like illness that has struck every two years since 2014. The condition, known as acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, is rare and has reached its peak for 2018. It will likely continue to fade as winter approaches. But many believe it will be back.   D68 Enterovirus "AFM is here, and it doesn't se...
Source: University of Bristol  Dec 24, 2018  3 years ago
Scientists have identified a growth factor found in the kidneys that could minimise the diabetes-inducing effects of blood vessel damage. The research, led by experts in renal disease and translational health sciences from the University of Bristol  focused on a group of growth factors categorised as VEGFs, or vascular endothelial growth factors. These are growth factors produced by...
Source: University Of Virginia School Of Medicine  Dec 23, 2018  3 years ago
A group of genes called SLCs that has been largely ignored by scientists could play critical roles in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), inflammation, and likely obesity and other metabolic diseases, new research suggests.The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in the context of how our bodies recognize and remove dying cells. SLC Gene &nb...
Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital  Dec 22, 2018  3 years ago
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a subset of helper T cells that may help to redefine understanding and treatment of chronic, debilitating inflammatory disorders. The study focused on a family of helper T cells called Th17 cells. Th17 cells help to launch the immune response against fungal infection and other threats. These cells can also fuel the destructive i...
Source: Yale University  Dec 21, 2018  3 years ago
In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell. Researchers around the world have been racing to create therapies that unleash th...
Source: Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 20, 2018  3 years ago
In a phase three clinical trial, a drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for two years in 80 percent of patients who completed treatment, a significant increase in progression-free survival compared with placebo. (Progression-free survival is the length of time a patient lives without worsening of the disease). There is no standard of care for patients with desmo...
Source: University Of Virginia  Dec 19, 2018  3 years ago
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have made a discovery about human papillomavirus (HPV) that could lead to new treatments for cervical cancer and other cancers caused by the virus. HPV is responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer and 95 percent of anal cancers. It is the most common sexually transmitted disease, infecting more than 600 million people glo...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center  Dec 18, 2018  3 years ago
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice. Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke. Blood pressur...
Source: University Of Tasmania  Dec 17, 2018  3 years ago
Diabetes has been tied to a number of complications such as kidney disease, but new research has found that older people with type 2 diabetes can also have more difficulties with thinking and memory.   During a five-year study, participants with diabetes showed a decline in verbal memory and fluency. Using MRI scans, researchers saw that the participants' brains were smaller at the star...
Source: Newcastle University  Dec 16, 2018  3 years ago
Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates. In the largest study of its kind, researchers at Newcastle University, UK, have led national research into the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed myeloma.   The results, published online today by The Lancet Oncolo...
Source: Rutgers University  Dec 15, 2018  3 years ago
Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. A team of Rutgers scientists, including Leonard Lee and Shaohua Li, have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce ...
Source: Harvard Medical School  Dec 14, 2018  3 years ago
The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led by investigators at Harvard Medical School suggests that weakened metabolism of immune T cells may be p...
Source: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc   Dec 13, 2018  3 years ago
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. Further, in HIV-infected men with virologic suppression testosterone was significantly associated with a higher BMD score at the lumbar spine, as reported in AID...
Source: Thai PBS World  Dec 13, 2018  3 years ago
Vegetables and fruits found in lunches for students under the government-sponsored lunch programme are almost 100 percent contaminated with pesticides and 99 percent of the urine samples from students and teachers in four provinces were tested with organophosphate, a deadly toxic pesticide that attacks nervous system. The above alarming findings were the result of a research jointly conducted by...
Source: University of Basel  Dec 13, 2018  3 years ago
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. The widely used...
Source: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil  Dec 12, 2018  3 years ago
Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed that a natural flavonoid is effective at treating Leishmania amazonensis infections. Leishmaniasis is endemic to 98 countries and affect...
Source: University of Glasgow  Dec 11, 2018  4 years ago
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for a transplant, dialysis is a life-saving treatment. New research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in the Journal Ame...
Source: TMN  Dec 10, 2018  4 years ago
 CAP or Community-acquired pneumonia disproportionately affects older people, with high rates of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Although pneumococcal vaccines are routinely recommended for this population, fewer than 40% of adults age 60 and older get vaccinated. Thus, antibiotics are key to treating CAP in the elderly—and the earlier that antibiotic therapy starts, the bett...
Source: University of Birmingham  Dec 09, 2018  4 years ago
The  large scale systematic review published in The Cochrane Library as part of a Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews bringing together a vast  body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer. The suite of eleven reviews was led by Dr Jac Dinnes at the University of Birmingham and supported by the Cochrane Skin Group and a team of over 30 researc...
Source: Northwestern University  Dec 08, 2018  4 years ago
An extensive study from Northwestern Medicine psanning over two decades,  reports that Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA  (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk o...
Source: University of Zurich  Dec 07, 2018  4 years ago
The current situation shows that doctors are prescribing to even healthy people who don't suffer from a cardiovascular disease ,cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins, if they meet certain risk criteria. However, for years the use of statins for primary prevention has been hotly debated among experts. "Ultimately, this measure helps to prevent heart attacks or strokes in only a few ...
Samitivej Hospitals  Dec 07, 2018  4 years ago
Samitivej Reaffirms Its Leadership in Mobile Health Innovations Samitivej is expanding its innovative mobile health services, based on the hospital’s deep understanding of patient needs. Samitivej Mobile Health offers Samitivej Plus app, Line@Samitivej and Samitivej PACE to improve the patient experience. Mobile Health is now also offering Ward Tracking application to assist patients in pre...
Source: Washington University School of Medicine  Dec 07, 2018  4 years ago
People with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease, even though none of these conditions seem to target the cardiovascular system directly. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis believe they have begun to understand the link between the two. Researchers studying mice with a pso...
Source: journal of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery  Dec 07, 2018  4 years ago
The topical retinoid tazarotene could be an efficacious and practical alternative to microneedling for treating atrophic postacne scarring, according to a new study. In a prospective, randomized, split-face study of adults with postacne scarring, both treatments resulted in similar efficacy after 6 months, reported T.P. Afra, MD, and associates from the department of dermatology, venereo...
Source: University of Montreal  Dec 07, 2018  4 years ago
A team of researchers at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at Université de Montréal has demonstrated that a cancer vaccine can work. Not only that, it could become an extremely effective, non-invasive and cost-effective cancer -fighting tool.   The team's work was published yesterday in Science Translational Medicine.The discovery repres...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center, US.  Dec 06, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice.Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke.   Blo...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine  Dec 05, 2018  4 years ago
The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.   Little or no mycoplasma DnaK DNA sequences were found associated with the tumor, which was ful...
Source: Scripps Research, US  Dec 04, 2018  4 years ago
An antibiotic, minocycline, can increase the lifespan of roundworms by preventing the build-up of proteins during aging, a study in the open-access journal eLife reports. Protein aggregation causes several progressive age-related brain diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion disease. This study shows that minocycline prevents this bu...
Source: The National Centre for Cancer Research, US  Dec 04, 2018  4 years ago
Immunotherapy, the strategy for triggering the patient's own immune system to attack cancer, is proving effective for more tumour types, although to varying degrees. In lung cancer, immunotherapy had proven to extend survival rates for only some variants of the disease. Now, an international clinical trial led by the oncologist Luis Paz-Ares has substantially increased the group of lung cancer...
Source: Tuff University  Dec 04, 2018  4 years ago
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features ...
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center  Dec 03, 2018  4 years ago
An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy—to be published on-line Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine (and presented at the ASH annual meeting in San Diego)—found that 52 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy; 40 percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response. One year later, 65 percent percent of those patients w...
Source: University Of Alabama at Birmingham  Dec 02, 2018  4 years ago
Preclinical experiments by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. HPV infections caused an estimated 266,000 deaths from cervical cancer worldwide in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Routine screening by Pap smears or HPV D...
Source: University Of Montreal  Dec 01, 2018  4 years ago
Of the 50 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Canadian scientists think they've found an important clue. TRIM5 Alpha protein Working in collaboration with a team...
Source: University Of Zurich  Nov 30, 2018  4 years ago
Stem cell transplantation is effective against leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue—often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process. Blocking this molecule could significantly improve the outcome of patients receivin...
Source: Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute for Medical Research  Nov 29, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists have uncovered that an emerging gene therapy for Parkinson's disease creates new circuits in the brain associated with improved motor movement. These findings, published today in Science Translational Medicine by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Professor David Eidelberg, MD, and his team, explain the therapeutic mechanisms involved in the emerging Parkinson's ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University Of Medicine  Nov 28, 2018  4 years ago
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells, but show no viral load in blood tests. While based on small numbers, the data suggest that long-term viral remission migh...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center   Nov 27, 2018  4 years ago
A new study has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. If confirmed in humans, they could lead to more effective ways to control certain aggressive types of prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death for men in the world. Men whose  prostrate cancer tumor...
Source: University of Minnesota  Nov 26, 2018  4 years ago
A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body. After targeting the "motors" that generate forces in cancer cells to move, the cancer ce...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Nov 25, 2018  4 years ago
Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research identified the mechanisms by which the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile kills intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), thus destroying the protective mucosal barrier of the intestinal tract. The researchers demonstrate the physiological relevance of this process during infection and have published their findings in Nature Commu...
Source: American Academy of Neurology  Nov 24, 2018  4 years ago
Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the November 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to researc...
Source: University Of Manchester  Nov 23, 2018  4 years ago
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease. The discovery is a major advance in understanding of the significantly under-diagnosed disorder which, if left undetected, can lead to failing kidneys that need dialysis or kidney transplantation.    The discovery of 35 kidney &n...
Source: Ministry Of Foreign Affairs (Thailand)  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
 On 21 November 2018, the Prince Mahidol Award Foundation under the Royal Patronage (PMAF) held a joint press conference at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, to announce the 27th Prince Mahidol Laureates for 2018 in the field of Medicine and Public Health. Ms. Busadee Santipitaks, Director-General of the Department of Information, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, in the capacity of the ...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer.    The results of the study, which was funded by Cancer Research UK and Worldwide Cancer Research, are published in Nature.   Tumours ...
Society for Endocrinology  Nov 22, 2018  4 years ago
Cognitive difficulties in patients with diabetes, caused by repeated episodes of low blood sugar, could be reduced with antioxidants, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces cognitive impairments caused by low blood sugar, which could help to improve the qualit...
University Of Queensland  Nov 21, 2018  4 years ago
A world-first clinical trial of a new cellular immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved symptoms and quality of life for the majority of patients. This electron microscopic image of two Epstein Barr Virus virions (viral particles) shows round capsids—protein-encased genetic material—loosely surrounded by the membrane envelope. Credit: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0030430.g...
Source: University Of Leeds   Nov 20, 2018  4 years ago
Both aspirin and a purified omega-3, called EPA, reduce the number of pre-cancerous polyps in patients found to be at high risk of developing bowel cancer, according to new research. A clinical trial, led by the University of Leeds, found that both aspirin and EPA reduced the number of bowel polyps in patients one year on from a screening colonoscopy (large bowel camera test), although they did ...
Source: VIB (The Flanders Institute For Biotechnology)   Nov 19, 2018  4 years ago
Mutations in RAS proteins initiate many of the most aggressive tumors, and the search for pharmacological inhibitors of these proteins has become a priority in the battle against cancer. Michail Steklov, Francesca Baietti, and colleagues from the Anna Sablina lab (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology) identified LZTR1 as an evolutionarily conserved component of the RAS pathway. Multiple ...
Source: British Medical Journal  Nov 19, 2018  4 years ago
Based on results of an observational  study published earlier this week in The BMJ, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, compared with a similar, but distinct type of blood pressure medication known as angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Researchers evaluated patients from a U.K. primary care database and identified ove...
Source: University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy (Kingston)  Nov 18, 2018  4 years ago
Antiepileptic drugs were found to be linked with almost ninefold increased odds for two adverse skin reactions, Steven‐Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, compared with non-AED medication classes in an analysis of adverse-event data from the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy in Kingston, wh...
Source: Canon Medical Systems  Nov 17, 2018  4 years ago
Canon Medical Won FDA clearance to bring to the U.S. market its brand new Vantage Orian 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. It features a wide 71 centimeter bore and quiet operation thanks to its Pianissimo and Pianissimo Zen technologies. Pianissimo makes all scanning sequences quieter, while Pianissimo Zen allows certain scans to be performed at near ambient noise levels. To help young patients and those ...
Source: US FDA  Nov 17, 2018  4 years ago
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved  cemiplimab (Libtayo) for use in patients with locally advanced or metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). This agent is the first to be approved for advanced cSCC and is intended for those who are not eligible for curative surgery or radiation. Researchers reported on the efficacy of cemiplimab in expansion cohorts of a phase I...
Source: Public Library Of Science, US  Nov 16, 2018  4 years ago
Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a study published November 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Steven Yukl of San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues. According to the authors, the findings could inform new therapies aimed at curing HIV. HIV R...

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