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Source: Flu Vaccine  Jun 23, 2020  2 years ago
Flu Vaccine: Cohort Study Shows That Influenza Vaccine Linked To Increased Risk Of Subdeltoid Bursitis
Flu Vaccine: Cohort Study Shows That Influenza Vaccine Linked To Increased Risk Of Subdeltoid Bursitis
Source: Flu Vaccine  Jun 23, 2020  2 years ago
Flu Vaccine: A new study has shown that influenza vaccination was associated with a small risk for subdetltoid bursitis in a large retrospective cohort study, an association that was previously supported by clinical evidence from case reports.


 
The research findings have been published in the journal: Annals of Internal Medicine. https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M19-3176
 
The researchers however said that education and training on proper injection technique could prevent this adverse event. In fact Injection technique may be the key to limiting vaccine-associated bursitis risk.
 
Typically, influenza is a potentially serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. An annual seasonal flu vaccine is the best way to help protect against flu. Vaccination has been shown to have many benefits including reducing the risk of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and even the risk of flu-related death in children.
 
The condition, subdeltoid bursitis is characterized by pain and loss of motion in the shoulder, occurs in about 1 percent of the American population and is usually due to injury. In 2012, an Institute of Medicine report concluded that evidence supported a causal relationship between the injection of a vaccine and deltoid bursitis, however, epidemiologic evidence for this relationship was lacking.
 
Medical researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC) studied data from the Vaccine Safety Datalink, which contains health encounter data for 10.2 million members of 7 U.S. health care organizations, to estimate the risk for subdeltoid bursitis after influenza vaccination. Of 2, 943, 493 vaccinated persons included in the analysis, the researchers found 16 cases of symptom onset in the risk interval and 51 cases of symptom onset in the control interval. The attributable risk was 7.78 additional cases of bursitis per 1 million persons vaccinated.
 
The medical researchers of an accompanying editorial from Emory University School of Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania point out that vaccination technique seems to be a common theme in this study as well as in previous studies. Both needle placement and needle length matter. Hence, a technique "tune-up" could help to eliminate this adverse reaction among persons having vaccinations.
 
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