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Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 25, 2020  3 months ago
MUST READ! New Research Indicates That Certain Nutraceuticals Could Help In Both Influenza And Coronavirus Infections
MUST READ! New Research Indicates That Certain Nutraceuticals Could Help In Both Influenza And Coronavirus Infections
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 25, 2020  3 months ago
(Disclaimer and warning: Though the following is a published medical research study with more than 39 supporting published works, Thailand Medical News warns that no claims should be made that these nutraceutucals or supplements cure, treat or prevent influenza and the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus.  Also individuals should never try to self-prescribe or self-treat if they suspect that they have either  disease or are manifesting any symptoms. They should immediately consult a doctor or seek help at the nearest hospital.)
 

A new published research by  Dr  Mark McCarty of the Catalytic Longevity Foundation, San Diego, CA, USA, and Dr James DiNicolantonio, PharmD, a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USA, proposes that certain nutraceutical supplements may help provide relief to people infected with encapsulated RNA viruses such as influenza and coronavirus.
 
The study identified that nutraceuticals such as Alpha-Lipoic Acid, N-Acetycysteine, Glucosamine, Selenium, Ferilic Acid, Yeast Beta –Glucan and also Selenium could help alleviate certain symptoms in those diseases and also help boost natural antiviral activity of the body by type I interferon.
 
In America alone, influenza infects around 32 million people every year causing around 32,000 deaths, while the global numbers are exponentially higher.
 
Though there are drugs and pharmaceuticals approved for the treatment of influenza, they typically are expensive with lots of  side effects, and are not very effective. Additionally, vaccinations against influenza may only be effective in around 60 percent of those vaccinated. Thus, there is a need for safer and effective alternatives in those infected with influenza.
 
In the last few weeks, a novel RNA coronavirus, now called SARS-Cov-2 that caused the COVID-19, has broken out in China and has spread to over 32 countries and infected more than 80,000 people causing more than 2,700 deaths.
 
In reality, this new coronavirus is much more lethal than the typical flu, with a current mortality rate of about 2.92 percent. In other words, around 1 in 33 people who are infected with this novel coronavirus will die. Whereas the annual flu has a mortality rate of just 0.05 to 0.1 percent. This means that around 1 in 1,000 to 2,000 people infected with the annual flu will die.
 
In other words, the new coronavirus is around 30 to 60 times more lethal than the typical annual flu.( strangely many health authorities are trying to downplay the seriousness of this new coronavirus especially China)
 
It has been observed and clinically proven that both influenza and coronavirus cause an inflammatory storm in the lungs and it is this inflammatory storm that leads to acute respiratory distress, organ failure, and death.
 
Certain nutraceutical suppements may help to reduce the inflammation in the lungs from RNA viruses and others may also help boost type 1 interferon response to these viruses, which is the body's primary way to help create antiviral antibodies to fight off viral infections.
 
The medical researchers drew attention to several randomized clinical studies in humans that have found that over the counter supplements such as n-acetylcysteine (NAC), which is used to treat acetaminophen poisoning and is also used as a mucus thinner to help reduce bronchitis exacerbations, and elderberry extracts, have evidence for shortening the duration of influenza by about two to four days and reducing the severity of the infection.
 
The medical researchers also note several nutraceuticals such beta-glucan, glucosamine, and NAC have either been found to reduce the severity of infection or to cut the rate of death in half in animals infected with influenza.
 
Dr. DiNicolantonio told Thailand Medical News, "Therefore, it is clear that certain nutraceuticals have antiviral effects in both human and animal studies. Considering that there is no treatment for the new coronavirus that causes the deadly Covid-19 disease and treatments for influenza are limited, we welcome further studies to test these nutraceuticals as a strategy to help provide relief in those infected with encapsulated RNA viruses."
 
Thailand Medical News also advises readers that when buying nutraceuticals and supplements, to do due diligence as many supplements brands carry product lines containing ingredients that are not really bioactive, not properly absorbable and sometimes mislead consumers by having the wrong isomer forms or chemical forms of the ingredients that are of no use.  Even worst in some cases, the might have either minute or no traces of the active ingredients and might contain certain dangerous contaminants. Most supplements are not properly regulated and monitored by health and regulatory agencies. It best to avoid all Asian manufactured brands especially those made in countries like Myanmar, Vietnam, Indonesia. Always stick to brands made in Canada, US and Germany.
 
For the latest coronavirus research, keep checking : https://www.thailandmedical.news/articles/coronavirus
 
Main Study Reference : Mark F. McCarty et al, Nutraceuticals have potential for boosting the type 1 interferon response to RNA viruses including influenza and coronavirus, Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases (2020). DOI: 10.1016/j.pcad.2020.02.007
 
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