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Source: COVID-19 Genetics  Nov 13, 2020  3 years, 5 months, 4 days, 21 hours, 59 minutes ago

BREAKING! COVID-19 Genetics: Yale Scientist Identify Eight ‘Super’ Genetic Variants In White People That Increases COVID-19 Death Risk!

BREAKING! COVID-19 Genetics: Yale Scientist Identify Eight ‘Super’ Genetic Variants In White People That Increases COVID-19 Death Risk!
Source: COVID-19 Genetics  Nov 13, 2020  3 years, 5 months, 4 days, 21 hours, 59 minutes ago
COVID-19 Genetics:  Scientist from Yale University in a new research have identified genetic variants among people of white British ancestry that may increase the risk of dying from COVID-19.


 
The study team considered the mortality as the trait of interest and perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of data for 1,778 infected cases (445 deaths, 25.03%) distributed by the UK Biobank. Traditional GWAS failed to identify any genome-wide significant genetic variants from this dataset. To enhance the power of GWAS and account for possible multi-loci interactions, the team adopted the concept of super-variant for the detection of genetic factors. A discovery-validation procedure was used for verifying the potential associations.
 
The researchers found 8 ‘super-variants’ that contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes that were consistently identified across multiple replications as susceptibility loci for COVID-19 mortality. The identified risk factors on Chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 8, 10, 16, and 17 contain genetic variants and genes related to cilia dysfunctions (DNAH7 and CLUAP1), cardiovascular diseases (DES and SPEG), thromboembolic disease (STXBP5), mitochondrial dysfunctions (TOMM7), and innate immune system (WSB1). It is noteworthy that DNAH7 has been reported recently as the most downregulated gene after infecting human bronchial epithelial cells with SARS-CoV2.
 
The research findings were published on a preprint server and are currently being peer reviewed. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.11.05.20226761v1
 
The study team say that the research findings may provide clues for better understanding the molecular pathogenesis of COVID-19 and the genetic basis underlying differences in susceptibility, which could potentially lead to new therapeutic options.
 
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to sweep the globe, devastating public health and the economy globally, it is imperative to understand how host genetic factors are linked to clinical outcomes.
 
These clinical outcomes are highly heterogeneous, with many patients experiencing mild or no symptoms, while others develop severe and life-threatening symptoms.
 
Ever since  COVID-19 first emerged in Wuhan, China, late last year (2019), many studies have reported an increased risk of death among males and certain ethnic groups, suggesting that mortality risk at the individual level might be influenced by host genetic factors. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7435574/