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Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 09, 2019  4 years, 9 months, 1 week, 2 days, 8 hours, 26 minutes ago

New Scam In The Medical Industry : Intravenous(IV) Vitamin Therapy Or Vitamin Drips

New Scam In The Medical Industry : Intravenous(IV) Vitamin Therapy Or Vitamin Drips
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 09, 2019  4 years, 9 months, 1 week, 2 days, 8 hours, 26 minutes ago
Despite being around for more than a decade, Intravenous Vitamin Therapy is again coming back as a new wellness or regenerative fad that every celebrity, successful executive or socialite must have. Despite warnings from various medical regulatory boards from around the world about claims that can be made, a lot of greedy doctors and wellness clinics are using discreet modes to market these Vitamin Drips as a cure all for various conditions or purposes ranging from detoxification, antiaging, skin complexion boosting, strengthening the immune system, even curing cancer, parkinson’s disease, macular degeneration, depression and even pain and even fibromyalgia. All of which have no proven scientific or medical research to back any one of these claims.


Medical Councils everywhere are closing an eye as its an opportunity for their fellow medical collegues to make money from a somewhat grey area. Most of these wellness clinics or even anti-aging centres  advertise these services and claims via the social media or through brochures that are only available at their centres. Its is big money making enterprise especially in countries like US, Canada, Australia, China and elsewhere in Asia.

A single Vitamin IV procedure can costs you anything from US$ 250 to US$ 3000 and normally you are required to sign up for a package of a minimum of 6 sessions (as some specialists claims that you can only see results after that! ) There is also chelation therapy (a solution of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) which these charlatans claim can remove toxic metals and other compounds from your body and  is similarly associated with IV Drips (these too have been receiving lots of negative press of late due to long term negative effects associated with the therapy.) Patients can kick back in comfy leather chairs while they're hooked up to IVs in the infusion lounge, watch Netflix and have some tea. Most of the time, these patients are merely paying for expensive urine.

Intravenous vitamin therapy involves administering vitamins and minerals directly into the bloodstream via a needle that goes directly into your vein. These physicians claim this enables you to obtain more nutrients as you avoid the digestion process. Providers of these injections say they customise the formula of vitamins and minerals depending on the perceived needs of the patient. Most contain Vitamin C, Zinc, The B Complex and others. What is even more disgusting is that you have certain fellow partners in the scam and questionable reputations of Medical Or Health Publications and Medical Tourism Entities that even give awards to these so called wellness and anti-aging centres.(further encouraging the scamming of unknowing patients!)

Lack of any evidence it works.
IV Vitamin therapy itself is not new and has been used in the medical profession for decades, commonly used to hydrate patients  and administer essential nutrients if there is an issue with gut absorption, or long-term difficulty eating or drinking due to surgery. Single nutrient deficiencies like vitamin B12 or iron are also often treated in hospital with infusions under medical supervision.

However the "cocktails" IV vitamin therapy clinics create and administer are not supported by scientific evidence. There have been no clinical studies to show vitamin injections of this type offer any health benefit or are necessary for good health. In fact, there are very few studies that have looked at their effectiveness at all. There has only been a single review about the use of the &q