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BREAKING NEWS
Source: University Of Melbourne  Jan 22, 2019  5 years, 2 months, 4 weeks, 11 hours, 6 minutes ago

University Of Melbourne Discovers New Stomach Cancer Options

University Of Melbourne Discovers New Stomach Cancer Options
Source: University Of Melbourne  Jan 22, 2019  5 years, 2 months, 4 weeks, 11 hours, 6 minutes ago
Researchers studying lupus discovered that treatments similar to those already in use to treat melanoma and lung cancer, including immunotherapy, show promise for stomach cancer and may even lead to preventative treatments.

University Of Melbourne Discovers New Stomach Cancer Options

Usually the symptoms of stomach or gastric cancer are hard to pick up until it’s too late, making what is a relatively common cancer an often fatal one.

Survival rates are low, and the main treatments are drastic—surgery to remove all or part of the stomach, usually followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

SPONTANEOUS AND INVASIVE

Lorraine O’Reilly, a researcher at the University of Melbourne, was working on the autoimmune disease lupus when she noticed some mice started to develop stomach tumors at around 12 to 18 months of age.

“When I consulted our pathologist, professor Paul Waring from the University of Melbourne, he didn’t believe me at first,” O’Reilly said in an exclusive interview with Thailand Medical News. “However, after reviewing the slides he sent me an enthusiastic email that afternoon asking to be involved in the project.”

These weren’t normal mice, they had been purposely bred without the gene NF-KB1. When the molecular immunologist and her colleague Tracy Putoczki investigated further, they discovered that removing this gene actually caused spontaneous development of malignant stomach cancer, driven by chronic inflammation.

“This was the first time we’ve seen spontaneous invasive stomach cancer in mouse models, but the amazing thing was