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Source: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW  Jan 20, 2019
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated for the first time. The discovery, pu...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 20, 2019
Positive news for Thailand’s healthcare sector was highly welcome when Bloomberg released their Global Health Care Efficiency Index in the last quarter of 2018. Thailand Medical News reviews these extremely positive results and suggest  why momentum must be maintained as well as 2 challenges that must be addressed in order for this momentum to be carried forward on a continuous basis...
Source: University of Michigan  Jan 20, 2019
A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends. Researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center reported in 2016 that acupressure helped reduce fatigue in breast cancer survivors. In the new study, they looked at the impact of acupressure on symptoms that frequently accompa...
Source: Hong Kong Baptist University  Jan 19, 2019
Epstein-Barr virus infects more than 95 percent of people, usually without symptoms. But sometimes its persistence in cells can lead to tumor formation. Now, researchers from Hong Kong and the UK have developed a fluorescing, molecular-sized probe, called L2P4, which can inhibit Epstein-Barr-related tumor growth while allowing researchers to see the targeted tumor cells. Epstein-Barr vi...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 19, 2019
The US FDA  and EU has approved a new sublingual formulation of sufentanil, Dsuvia, for the management of acute pain in adults in medically supervised healthcare settings, such as hospitals, surgical centers, and emergency departments. The drug is supplied in a 30 microgram tablet in a single-dose, prefilled applicator for administration by a healthcare professional, and it will not be availa...
New Stem Cell Therapy To Treat Diabetes  Jan 18, 2019
Scientists working to develop more effective treatments for diabetes are turning to stem cells. Such cells can be transformed into cells that produce insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more ...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 18, 2019
Various research reports on Thailand’s role in the production, local dissemination and exportation to domestic as well as international markets for medical devices reveal healthy forecasts. Predications are that the medical device market in the country  will continue to grow at average rates of between 8.5-10% per annum. Such strength in growth opens exciting opportunities for the M...
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences  Jan 18, 2019
UCLA researchers have developed the first technique for turning certain stem cells into mature T cells capable of fighting cancer. The university announced on  January  17th  2019,  that its scientists had developed a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells – which can create cell in the body and be grown in a lab – into T cells that can attack tumors. Immun...
Source: US FDA  Jan 18, 2019
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a safety alert regarding the possibility of an increased risk of death associated with the use of paclitaxel-coated balloons and paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The FDA's communication follows a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Heart Association ...
Source: NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine  Jan 17, 2019
A new class of engineered proteins may counter infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus -- a bacterial species considered one of the largest global health threats, a new study suggests. Published online Jan. 16 in Science Translational Medicine, the study is the result of a five-year research partnership between scientists at NYU School of Medicine and Janssen Research & Dev...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 16, 2019
The bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) is sexually transmitted and can cause inflammation of the urinary and genital tracts in men and women. This germ may also be linked to other problems, including some cases of arthritis and, in women, pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. MG appears to be spread by unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, as it can be detected in fluid sa...
Source: Hong Kong University  Jan 16, 2019
The world has been repeatedly plagued by infectious disease outbreaks, including SARS and MERS coronaviruses, avian influenza viruses, and Zika virus. A team at the Medical Faculty of The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) led by Professor Yuen Kwok-yung and Dr Shuofeng Yuan of the Department of Microbiology, has discovered a novel broad-spectrum antiviral drug that would be strategic for epidemic c...
Source: Hyogo College of Medicine, Japan  Jan 15, 2019
In a recent study conducted by Professor Dr. Tadayuki Oshima and Professor Dr. Eitatsu Arai from Hyogo College of Medicine, in Japan , demonstrated that the potassium-competitive acid blocker (P-CAB) vonoprazan demonstrates superior efficacy in the treatment of patients with erosive oesophagitis compared with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole, with the results of a small ...
Source: Krembil Research Institute  Jan 15, 2019
Scientists at the Krembil Research Institute have developed a novel therapeutic treatment that has the potential to stop knee and spine osteoarthritis in its tracks. A team led by Principal Investigator Dr. Mohit Kapoor, Arthritis Research Director at UHN, published the results today in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases in a paper titled "microRNA-181a-5p antisense oligonucleotide...
Source: Ontario Institute for Cancer Research  Jan 15, 2019
Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered mutational signatures of tumor hypoxia (low oxygen) in 19 cancer types. The results could be used to help clinicians identify patients who would benefit from higher treatment doses.   In a landmark pan-cancer study  analyzing more than 8,000 tumors across 19 different cancer types, researchers have identified molecular hallm...
Source: PLOS  Jan 15, 2019
A practical resource-based public health approach for the rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals living in low- and middle-income countries could save thousands of lives, according to an Essay published January 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Mark Tenforde of the University of Washington School of Medicine, and colleagues. Effective antir...
Source: North American Menopause Society (NAMS).  Jan 14, 2019
There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results. A new large-scale study from Korea shows that women receiving HT had a significantly lower prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with women who did not take hormones. Study results are published online in Menopause, the ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 14, 2019
There are many convincing reasons why expats living in Thailand must take advantage of the country’s healthcare systems. As well as looking at the real benefits to be seen if an individual ever needs to avail of the country’s world-class hospitals, we, at Thailand Medical News will also touch on the more practical matters at local healthcare level. There is a local clinic near you!...
Source: Newcastle University  Jan 14, 2019
There is little benefit for those over 70 taking higher dose vitamin D supplements to improve their bone strength and reduce the risk of falls, new research has revealed. Older people are often encouraged to take supplements of vitamin D to keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy. But a Newcastle University-led study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, has backed previous...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Jan 13, 2019
Spondyloarthritis is one of the most common types of chronic joint inflammation affecting nearly 1-2% of the Western population. Cytokine blockade of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and more recently Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has revolutionized the perspectives of patients suffering from this disease by achieving high levels of therapeutic efficacy. The disease differs substantially from rheumatoid arthr...
Source: Massachusetts General Hospital  Jan 13, 2019
A study from a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified the specific function of a protein found in HIV and related viruses that appears to slow down viral spread in the earliest stages of infection. But they also found that, after initially slowing down the spread of infection, that function may help the virus survive later on by evading the immune response. Their report ...
Source: US FDA  Jan 13, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ultomiris (ravulizumab) injection for the treatment of adult patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a rare and life-threatening blood disease. “The approval of Ultomiris will change the way that patients with PNH are treated,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence an...
Source: Bruin Biometrics  Jan 13, 2019
Pressure ulcers are a common malady for bedridden patients, a situation that clinicians have been struggling to improve significantly. There are devices that  sense how long a part of a body has been pressed on for too long, beds that deflate and inflate different areas to provide temporary respite, and clinical routines that help to prevent pressure ulcers. Bruin Biometrics, a compan...
Source: Loyola University Health System  Jan 12, 2019
A landmark study co-authored by a Loyola Medicine oncologist has found that a newer targeted drug is significantly more effective than standard therapy for treating elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The drug, ibrutinib, attacks cancer cells without damaging normal cells, thus causing fewer side effects. The drug is taken as a pill once a day -- much more convenient than ...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Jan 12, 2019
Alzheimer's-affected brains are riddled with so-called amyloid plaques: protein aggregates consisting mainly of amyloid-β. However, this amyloid-β is a fragment produced from a precursor protein whose normal function has remained enigmatic for decades. A team of scientists at VIB and KU Leuven led by professors Joris de Wit and Bart De Strooper has now uncovered that this amyloid pre...
Source: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center  Jan 12, 2019
Researchers have identified a new potential immunotherapy target in pancreatic cancer, which so far has been notoriously resistant to treatment with immune checkpoint blockade drugs effective against a variety of other cancers. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center research team found overexpression of the immune checkpoint VISTA on immune cells, especially macrophages, that infiltr...
Source: University Of Basel  Jan 11, 2019
The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. In the journal Cell, the team of molecular biologists, computational biologists, and clinicians reports on their interdisciplinary approach. The imag...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Jan 10, 2019
New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. Researchers proposed two explanations for the association of heightened immune responses in patients with schizophrenia and EBV in...
Source: National Multiple Sclerosis Society  Jan 10, 2019
An immune system drug may help prevent or slow complications in a type of multiple sclerosis known as secondary progressive MS, a new study finds. The medication is called rituximab (Rituxan). It's used to treat a number of conditions, including certain blood cell cancers and the autoimmune condition rheumatoid arthritis. The new Swiss study found that MS patients taking the drug reported ...
Source: University of Louisville  Jan 10, 2019
Scientists at the University of Louisville have shown that a microbial metabolite, Urolithin A, derived from a compound found in berries and pomegranates, can reduce and protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Millions of people worldwide suffer from IBD in the form of either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, and few effective long-term treatments are available. Illustration s...
Source: Arizona State University  Jan 09, 2019
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD).   Lead authors Ramon Velazquez and Salvatore Oddo, along with their colleagues in the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), investigate the effects of choline, an important nutrient that ma...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Jan 08, 2019
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a protein involved in cell proliferation and the development of new blood vessels that could serve as a marker for the early detection of colorectal cancers. In laboratory studies, investigators found that expression of the protein, called beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase-V (beta-1,4-GalT-V), was increased in human colorectal cancer tumor cells compared w...
Source: University Health Network  Jan 08, 2019
A clinical-scientific team specializing in head-and-neck cancer has identified a way to manipulate metabolism to potentially curb skin fibrosis -- a common side effect of radiotherapy affecting quality of life of cancer survivors. The study findings from the laboratory of principal investigator Dr. Fei-Fei Liu, Chief, Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Networ...
Source: Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.  Jan 08, 2019
Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with an oral nerve pain medication used to treat pain caused by a previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to a Rutgers study.   The study, which was the first to analyze sexual function in women with vulva pain treated with Gabapentin, appeared in the American Journal of Obstetri...
Source: DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)  Jan 07, 2019
A research team led by Professor Sung Bae Lee of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Professor Daehee Hwang of New Biology (Vice-head of the Plant Age and Life Research Group, IBS) has identified the early neuropathology mechanism of structural characteristics of polyglutamine toxic protein on neurodegenerative brain disorders. It was through a joint research with Professor Yuh Nung Jan at the Howard...
Staff Writer, Thailand Medical News  Jan 07, 2019
Despite having some of the best vantage points in term of being a being an excellent tourism destination coupled with some of the best medical facilities and hospitals in the world, Thailand is gradually losing its edge as a Medical Tourism destination in the region due to a variety of factors. Among the top three factors amidst an assortment of reasons are:  a) Lack of Proper Medical Marke...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Jan 06, 2019
Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells. In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol...
Source: Baylor College of Medicine  Jan 06, 2019
Fungal infections are emerging as a major medical challenge, and a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a mouse model to study the short-term consequences of fungal infection in the brain. The researchers report in the journal Nature Communications the unexpected finding that the common yeast Candida albicans, a type of fungus, can cross the blood-b...
Source: University Of Bergen  Jan 05, 2019
Diabetes is caused by damaged or non-existing insulin cells inability to produce insulin, a hormone that is necessary in regulating blood sugar levels. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels. In collaboration with other international researchers, researchers at the University of Bergen have, discovered that glucagon.producing cells in the pancreas, can change i...
Source: Princeton University  Jan 04, 2019
By simultaneously tackling two mechanisms for cancer's growth, an experimental therapy reduced the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in a study conducted in mice. The therapeutic agent, called Tinagl1, is based on a naturally occurring protein and blocks two of the main pathways by which breast cancer cells can grow and migrate out of the primary tumor to spread to other organs in the b...
Source: Oregon State University  Jan 03, 2019
A research study at Oregon State University has shown that a higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems. Metabolic syndrome affects more than 30 percent of the global adult population and this findings might provide some relief to a majority of them. "What these findin...
Source: University Of California -Berkeley  Jan 02, 2019
A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's. In a proposed device, two of the new chips would be embedded in a chassis located outside the head. Each chip could monitor elec...
Source: University Of Zurich  Jan 01, 2019
Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease of the lung, for which there is currently no cure. The underlying cause of the disease is a malfunction of the chloride channel CFTR, which prevents the secretion of chloride in certain body cells. This leads to dehydration of the mucus layer in the lung. A promising approach for treating cystic fibrosis is the activation of the calcium-activated chlo...
Source: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.  Jan 01, 2019
Scientists have created a cheaper, faster, reproducible diagnostic technique that has the potential to predict the risk of metastasis in prostate cancer.   For patients who are newly diagnosed, or patients previously treated, the risk of metastasis in prostrate cancer  is a crucial factor of whether to choose conservative management or undergo further treatment. For prostate as we...
Source: University of California San Diego  Jan 01, 2019
Dermal fibroblasts are specialized cells deep in the skin that generate connective tissue and help the skin recover from injury. Some fibroblasts have the ability to convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving the skin a plump, youthful look and producing a peptide that plays a critical role in fighting infections. Studies by the University of California San Diego School of Medic...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019
A company is in Houston, Texas is introducing new acoustic shockwave technology for quicker laser tattoo removal. What’s more, the new device also shows potential in aesthetics market for cellulite and fat removal. The patented Rapid Acoustic Pulse (RAP) device by Soliton Inc, uses acoustic shockwaves that accelerated the speed of tattoo removal when used with lasers, delivering results i...
Source: Medical University of Vienna  Jan 01, 2019
A type of glycoproteins ie carbohydrate binding proteins, called galectins, plays an important role in the degeneration of cartilage in osteoarthritis. A research group at the Medical University of Vienna was able to demonstrate this correlation, in cooperation with international study partners. In osteoarthritis, certain galectins are produced by the cartilage cells themselves and accelerate the ...
Source: Staff Writer, Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019
Firibastat By Quantum Genomics is an oral antihypertensive drug that has proved  to be safe and effective and well-tolerated  in  the NEW-HOPE, a phase 2b clinical trial focused on an understudied and underserved patient population composed largely of overweight or obese, high-risk, hypertensive racial minorities. Firibastat is the first brain aminopeptidase A inhibitor. It selec...
Source: University of Michigan  Jan 01, 2019
A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries. "We've known for a long time that esophageal adenocarcinoma primarily affects Caucasians and ver...
Source: Pasteur Institute  Jan 01, 2019
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus – it is their metabolic (or energy-producing) activity1 that enables the virus to multiply. Thanks to met...
Source: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center   Jan 01, 2019
An investigational oral antibiotic called zoliflodacin was well-tolerated and successfully cured most cases of uncomplicated gonorrhea when tested in a Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial, according to findings published  in the New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, sponsored the ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University   Jan 01, 2019
A new test for chlamydia can provide results within 30 minutes, potentially speeding up the start of treatment, researchers say.   The rapid test for the sexually transmitted disease means patients can receive treatment immediately, instead of having to wait for a follow-up appointment. This could help reduce the spread of the disease, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins Universit...
Source: Texas A&M University  Jan 01, 2019
A recent study led by researchers in Texas A&M University's department of nutrition and food science shows how a novel regulatory mechanism serves as an important biomarker for the development of diabetes, as well as a potential therapeutic target for its prevention. The study can be found online in the November edition of the diabetes journal of the American Diabetes Associati...
Source: University of Groningen  Jan 01, 2019
A team of researchers with members from the Netherlands and the U.S. has found differences in the numbers of gut microbes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine the group describes how they sequenced the genome of gut microbes in patients with bowel problems and what they found. ...
Source: University Of South Australia  Jan 01, 2019
One of the biggest health issues could be checked if more people took up yoga or tai chi and reduced their blood pressure, an Australian study has found. Stroke costs the world $120 billion a year through treatment and loss of productivity, affecting 2.6 million people in  2017. A paper published in Future Neurology by researchers from Monash University, the University of South ...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Jan 01, 2019
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels. According to a recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, magnesium may help in maintaining optimum vitamin D levels in the body. The randomised study that had 250...
Source: Teva Pharmaceuticals  Jan 01, 2019
The FDA has approved the first inhaler with built-in monitoring sensors to track medication adherence for asthma and COPD patients, according to Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. The ProAir Digihaler (albuterol sulfate 117 mcg) inhalation powder is equipped with built-in sensors that connect via Bluetooth to a companion mobile application, which stores data. Teva's &nbs...
Source: Cleveland Clinic  Dec 31, 2018
Cleveland Clinic researchers have shown, for the first time in humans, that choline is directly linked to increased production of a gut bacteria byproduct that increases the risk of blood-clotting events like heart attack and stroke. However, the research also showed that adding a low dose of aspirin may reduce that risk. In a small interventional study, the researchers provided oral choline, ...
Source: Osaka University  Dec 30, 2018
A team of researchers led by Osaka University examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli (CR-E) in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent. This Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a non-pathogenic bacterium, so the residents have no symptom...
Source: Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine  Dec 29, 2018
The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance—which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure—from natural dietary fiber. "You are what you eat," as the proverb goes. But to a large extent our well-being also dep...
Source: University of Southern California  Dec 28, 2018
A new study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers shows there's yet another reason to avoid a high fat, high cholesterol diet: It can trigger changes in the immune system that lead to a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States, and an estimated ...
Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 27, 2018
A new study has found that genes cause about 1 in 10 cases of chronic kidney disease in adults, and that identifying the responsible genes has a direct impact on treatment for most of these patients.  “Our study shows that genetic testing can be used to personalize the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, and that nephrologists should consider incorporating it into the diagnost...
Source: University Of Toronto  Dec 26, 2018
Letrozole was found to damage normal function in the hippocampus of monkeys The animals also showed anxiety and hot flashes after four weeks of treatment Side effects like fatigue are experienced by up to 30% of women on the drug   A drug commonly given out  to breast-cancer patients may affect their brain function and memory, research suggests.Letrozole is primarily used to treat b...
Source: Dallas Morning News (Anna Kuchment)  Dec 25, 2018
Medical researchers fear that more children will develop paralysis from a mysterious polio like illness that has struck every two years since 2014. The condition, known as acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, is rare and has reached its peak for 2018. It will likely continue to fade as winter approaches. But many believe it will be back.   D68 Enterovirus "AFM is here, and it doesn't se...
Source: University of Bristol  Dec 24, 2018
Scientists have identified a growth factor found in the kidneys that could minimise the diabetes-inducing effects of blood vessel damage. The research, led by experts in renal disease and translational health sciences from the University of Bristol  focused on a group of growth factors categorised as VEGFs, or vascular endothelial growth factors. These are growth factors produced by...
Source: University Of Virginia School Of Medicine  Dec 23, 2018
A group of genes called SLCs that has been largely ignored by scientists could play critical roles in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), inflammation, and likely obesity and other metabolic diseases, new research suggests.The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in the context of how our bodies recognize and remove dying cells. SLC Gene &nb...
Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital  Dec 22, 2018
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a subset of helper T cells that may help to redefine understanding and treatment of chronic, debilitating inflammatory disorders. The study focused on a family of helper T cells called Th17 cells. Th17 cells help to launch the immune response against fungal infection and other threats. These cells can also fuel the destructive ...
Source: Yale University  Dec 21, 2018
In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell. Researchers around the world have been racing to create therapies that unleash t...
Source: Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 20, 2018
In a phase three clinical trial, a drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for two years in 80 percent of patients who completed treatment, a significant increase in progression-free survival compared with placebo. (Progression-free survival is the length of time a patient lives without worsening of the disease). There is no standard of care for patients with desmo...
Source: University Of Virginia  Dec 19, 2018
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have made a discovery about human papillomavirus (HPV) that could lead to new treatments for cervical cancer and other cancers caused by the virus. HPV is responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer and 95 percent of anal cancers. It is the most common sexually transmitted disease, infecting more than 600 million people glo...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center  Dec 18, 2018
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice. Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke. Blood pressu...
Source: University Of Tasmania  Dec 17, 2018
Diabetes has been tied to a number of complications such as kidney disease, but new research has found that older people with type 2 diabetes can also have more difficulties with thinking and memory.   During a five-year study, participants with diabetes showed a decline in verbal memory and fluency. Using MRI scans, researchers saw that the participants' brains were smaller at the star...
Source: Newcastle University  Dec 16, 2018
Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates. In the largest study of its kind, researchers at Newcastle University, UK, have led national research into the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed myeloma.   The results, published online today by The Lancet Oncolo...
Source: Rutgers University  Dec 15, 2018
Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. A team of Rutgers scientists, including Leonard Lee and Shaohua Li, have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce ...
Source: Harvard Medical School  Dec 14, 2018
The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led by investigators at Harvard Medical School suggests that weakened metabolism of immune T cells may be p...
Source: University of Basel  Dec 13, 2018
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. The widely use...
Source: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc   Dec 13, 2018
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. Further, in HIV-infected men with virologic suppression testosterone was significantly associated with a higher BMD score at the lumbar spine, as reported in AID...
Source: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil  Dec 12, 2018
Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed that a natural flavonoid is effective at treating Leishmania amazonensis infections. Leishmaniasis is endemic to 98 countries and affect...
Source: TMN  Dec 10, 2018
 CAP or Community-acquired pneumonia disproportionately affects older people, with high rates of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Although pneumococcal vaccines are routinely recommended for this population, fewer than 40% of adults age 60 and older get vaccinated. Thus, antibiotics are key to treating CAP in the elderly—and the earlier that antibiotic therapy starts, the bett...
Source: University of Birmingham  Dec 09, 2018
The  large scale systematic review published in The Cochrane Library as part of a Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews bringing together a vast  body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer. The suite of eleven reviews was led by Dr Jac Dinnes at the University of Birmingham and supported by the Cochrane Skin Group and a team of over 30 researc...
Source: Northwestern University  Dec 08, 2018
An extensive study from Northwestern Medicine psanning over two decades,  reports that Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA  (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk o...
Source: University of Montreal  Dec 07, 2018
A team of researchers at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at Université de Montréal has demonstrated that a cancer vaccine can work. Not only that, it could become an extremely effective, non-invasive and cost-effective cancer -fighting tool.   The team's work was published yesterday in Science Translational Medicine.The discovery repres...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center, US.  Dec 06, 2018
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice.Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke.   Blo...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine  Dec 05, 2018
The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer. Little or no mycoplasma DnaK DNA sequences were found associated with the tumor, which was fully dev...
Source: Tuff University  Dec 04, 2018
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features ...
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center  Dec 03, 2018
An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy—to be published on-line Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine (and presented at the ASH annual meeting in San Diego)—found that 52 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy; 40 percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response. One year later, 65 percent percent of those patients w...
Source: University Of Alabama at Birmingham  Dec 02, 2018
Preclinical experiments by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. HPV infections caused an estimated 266,000 deaths from cervical cancer worldwide in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Routine screening by Pap smears or HPV D...
Source: University Of Montreal  Dec 01, 2018
Of the 50 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Canadian scientists think they've found an important clue. TRIM5 Alpha protein Working in collaboration with a tea...
Source: University Of Zurich  Nov 30, 2018
Stem cell transplantation is effective against leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue—often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process. Blocking this molecule could significantly improve the outcome of patients receivin...
Source: Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute for Medical Research  Nov 29, 2018
Scientists have uncovered that an emerging gene therapy for Parkinson's disease creates new circuits in the brain associated with improved motor movement. These findings, published today in Science Translational Medicine by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Professor David Eidelberg, MD, and his team, explain the therapeutic mechanisms involved in the emerging Parkinson's ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University Of Medicine  Nov 28, 2018
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells, but show no viral load in blood tests. While based on small numbers, the data suggest that long-term viral remission migh...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center   Nov 27, 2018
A new study has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. If confirmed in humans, they could lead to more effective ways to control certain aggressive types of prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death for men in the world. Men whose  prostrate cancer tumor...
Source: University of Minnesota  Nov 26, 2018
A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body. After targeting the "motors" that generate forces in cancer cells to move, the cancer ce...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Nov 25, 2018
Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research identified the mechanisms by which the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile kills intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), thus destroying the protective mucosal barrier of the intestinal tract. The researchers demonstrate the physiological relevance of this process during infection and have published their findings in Nature Commu...
Source: American Academy of Neurology  Nov 24, 2018
Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the November 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to researc...
Source: University Of Manchester  Nov 23, 2018
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease. The discovery is a major advance in understanding of the significantly under-diagnosed disorder which, if left undetected, can lead to failing kidneys that need dialysis or kidney transplantation.    The discovery of 35 kidney &n...
Society for Endocrinology  Nov 22, 2018
Cognitive difficulties in patients with diabetes, caused by repeated episodes of low blood sugar, could be reduced with antioxidants, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces cognitive impairments caused by low blood sugar, which could help to improve the qualit...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Nov 22, 2018
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer.    The results of the study, which was funded by Cancer Research UK and Worldwide Cancer Research, are published in Nature.   Tumours ...
Source: Ministry Of Foreign Affairs (Thailand)  Nov 22, 2018
 On 21 November 2018, the Prince Mahidol Award Foundation under the Royal Patronage (PMAF) held a joint press conference at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, to announce the 27th Prince Mahidol Laureates for 2018 in the field of Medicine and Public Health. Ms. Busadee Santipitaks, Director-General of the Department of Information, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, in the capacity of the ...
University Of Queensland  Nov 21, 2018
A world-first clinical trial of a new cellular immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved symptoms and quality of life for the majority of patients. This electron microscopic image of two Epstein Barr Virus virions (viral particles) shows round capsids—protein-encased genetic material—loosely surrounded by the membrane envelope. Credit: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0030430.g...
Source: University Of Leeds   Nov 20, 2018
Both aspirin and a purified omega-3, called EPA, reduce the number of pre-cancerous polyps in patients found to be at high risk of developing bowel cancer, according to new research. A clinical trial, led by the University of Leeds, found that both aspirin and EPA reduced the number of bowel polyps in patients one year on from a screening colonoscopy (large bowel camera test), although they did...
Source: British Medical Journal  Nov 19, 2018
Based on results of an observational  study published earlier this week in The BMJ, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, compared with a similar, but distinct type of blood pressure medication known as angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Researchers evaluated patients from a U.K. primary care database and identified ov...
Source: VIB (The Flanders Institute For Biotechnology)   Nov 19, 2018
Mutations in RAS proteins initiate many of the most aggressive tumors, and the search for pharmacological inhibitors of these proteins has become a priority in the battle against cancer. Michail Steklov, Francesca Baietti, and colleagues from the Anna Sablina lab (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology) identified LZTR1 as an evolutionarily conserved component of the RAS pathway. Multiple ...
Source: University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy (Kingston)  Nov 18, 2018
Antiepileptic drugs were found to be linked with almost ninefold increased odds for two adverse skin reactions, Steven‐Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, compared with non-AED medication classes in an analysis of adverse-event data from the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy in Kingston, ...
Source: US FDA  Nov 17, 2018
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved  cemiplimab (Libtayo) for use in patients with locally advanced or metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). This agent is the first to be approved for advanced cSCC and is intended for those who are not eligible for curative surgery or radiation. Researchers reported on the efficacy of cemiplimab in expansion cohorts of a phase I...
Source: Karolinska Institutet  Nov 16, 2018
A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation. The study is published in Science and was done in collaboration with the University of Texas Medical Branch, Uppsala...
Source: University Health Network  Nov 15, 2018
Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined "liquid biopsy", epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings, published online today in Nature, describe not only a way to detect cancer,  but hold promise of bei...
Source: TMN Staff Writer  Nov 15, 2018
Yet another blood pressure drug has been recalled because of fears of impurities added by a lab in China. Drug company Sandoz says it has recalled one lot of losartan  potassium hydrochlorothiazide tablets. The impurity, known as NDEA, was found in the drug’s key ingredient made by Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceutical Co. in China. NDEA is found naturally in certain foods, drinking wa...
Source: Translational Research Center For Medical Innovation, Kobe, Japan  Nov 15, 2018
Blocking amyloid assemble in blood vessels is a promising strategy for slowing dementia. Milk Thistle A component of milk thistle may prevent the deterioration in brain function associated with Alzheimer’s disease by blocking the aggregation of the amyloid-β protein in the brain’s blood vessels.   Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-&b...
Source: American Heart Association  Nov 14, 2018
Low-dose rivaroxaban (Xarelto) added to antiplatelet therapy was associated with reduced risk of thromboembolic events in heart failure patients, researchers reported here.   In post hoc analysis of the COMMANDER HF trial, rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) led to a lower composite of thromboembolic events (13.1% vs 15.5%, HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.96) compared with placebo, reported Barry Green...
Source: Georgetown University Medical Center   Nov 14, 2018
A defining feature of Parkinson's disease is the clumps of alpha-synuclein protein that accumulate in the brain's motor control area, destroying dopamine-producing neurons. Natural processes can't clear these clusters, known as Lewy bodies, and no one has demonstrated how to stop the build up as well as breakdown of the clumps—until perhaps now.   A team of neurologists at...
Source: University Of Minnesota  Nov 13, 2018
Researchers from the University of Minnesota, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the University of Toronto have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis—more commonly known as mono or the "kissing disease"—that infects millions of people around the globe each...
SOURCE: BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  Nov 13, 2018
Uncovering a novel mechanism that promotes growth of breast cancer bone metastasis has revealed a potential Achilles' heel for these cancer cells. Reported in the journal Cancer Cell, the study shows that interfering with this mechanism can reduce the risk of relapses in animal models. "Metastasis is the dissemination of cancer cells from the original tumor location to other organ...
Source: Yale University  Nov 12, 2018
A drug therapy used for patients with chronic heart failure also improves markers of poor prognosis in individuals who are hospitalized with acute heart failure, new Yale-led research shows. The findings suggest that the drug can improve outcomes for acutely ill heart patients and potentially become the new standard of care for treating this serious condition, the researchers said. The study wa...
Source: University of Tampere  Nov 12, 2018
Brown spots on skin caused by sun exposure can be removed using medicated creams, a process that may help prevent future cancers. Actinic keratoses – also known as sun spots – are brown or pink scaly marks caused by UV rays. In the past, it’s been possible to have sun spots removed by freezing them off with liquid nitrogen, but the pain associated with this...
Source: NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences(USA)  Nov 11, 2018
The National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded there is clear evidence that male rats exposed to high levels of radio frequency radiation (RFR) like that used in 2G , 3G and 4G cell phones developed cancerous heart tumors, according to final reports released today. There was also some evidence of tumors in the brain and adrenal gland of exposed male rats. For female rats, and male and female mice...
Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  Nov 10, 2018
The management of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV), an autoimmune disorder that cripples the immune system by attacking healthy cells, remains a major global health challenge in developing countries that lack infrastructure and trained medical professionals. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone...
Source: University Of Iowa  Nov 09, 2018
An unexpected finding that links a structural heart protein to gene regulation following heart stress suggests potential new avenues for developing heart failure therapies.   The work led by University of Iowa heart researcher Long-Sheng Song, MD, focuses on a protein called junctophilin-2 (JP2). Previous work from Song's lab has shown that JP2 is a structural protein that is essen...
Source: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center  Nov 06, 2018
Study points to possible way to predict increased inflammation risk   With an estimated 40 million people in the world dealing with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), physicians can have a hard time telling which newly diagnosed patients have a high risk of severe inflammation or what therapies will be most effective. Now researchers report in the journal JCI Insights finding an ep...
Source: University of Sheffield  Nov 04, 2018
Vitamin D supplements could help to ease painful Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) symptoms, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found. Scientists from the University's Department of Oncology and Metabolism reviewed and integrated all available research on vitamin D and IBS -- a condition which affects two in 10 people in the UK. The study showed a high prevalence of vitamin D def...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center  Nov 02, 2018
A team led by a Cedars-Sinai physician-scientist has discovered a biomarker -- a protein found in the blood -- for the most common type of heart failure, a new study published today in JAMA Cardiologyshows. Discovery may aid doctors in diagnosing at-risk patients before symptoms appear. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) affects more than 6.5 million Americans each year...
Source: University of Otago  Nov 01, 2018
University of Otago researchers have used high-resolution electron microscopy images to reveal how an anti-cancer virus interacts with tumor cells, increasing its potential to save lives. Seneca Valley Virus (SVV), a newly discovered virus which infects cancer cells but not normal tissue, has become a main research project in the New Zealand laboratory of Dr Mihnea Bostina, Academic Director of ...
Source: National News Bureau Of Thailand  Oct 29, 2018
The Ministry of Public Health has instructed all hospitals under it to prescribe medications appropriately, and lower antibiotics use by 20%, by 2021.    In 2019, the ministry will decrease antibiotic prescriptions for upper respiratory tract infections, acute diarrhea, open wounds and normal labor, to decrease drug resistant risks. The ministry instructed the hospitals to prescribe me...
Source: Lund University in Sweden  Oct 26, 2018
By blocking a protein, VDAC1, in the insulin-producing beta cells, it is possible to restore their normal function in case of type 2 diabetes. In preclinical experiments, the researchers behind a new study have also shown that it is possible to prevent the development of the disease. The findings are published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism. VDAC1 Protein The researchers at Lund...
Source: University Of North Carolina  Oct 26, 2018
Internists now know that patients who have a sibling with diverticulitis can have three times the risk for the disease, and a low-risk lifestyle decreases risk of incident diverticulitis by half. Nuts, seeds, and popcorn are now OK. Annually in the U.S., diverticulitis is responsible for 2.5 million office visits, 333,000 ED visits, 216,000 hospital admissions, and health care costs of $3.5 bill...
Source: University of East Anglia  Oct 26, 2018
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death. Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. The main types of omega 3 fatty acids are; alphalinolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaeno...
Source: Roche  Oct 25, 2018
Roche announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Xofluza™ (baloxavir marboxil) for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated influenza, or flu, in people 12 years of age and older. Xofluza is a first-in-class, single-dose oral medicine with a novel proposed mechanism of action that inhibits polymerase acidic endonuclease, an enzyme essential for viral replication. [1-2...
Source: siemens.com  Jul 10, 2018
Siemens Healthineers is releasing a fresh update to its popular ACUSON Sequoia ultrasound system. The device can image deeper than before while maintaining a high quality output, an important capability for those on the front lines of the obesity epidemic. As an example, using the Deep Abdominal Transducer (DAX) that comes with the Sequoia, clinicians can image targets pretty well as dee...
Source: doi.org  Jul 10, 2018
Using high energy ultrasound beams to destroy prostate cancer tumours may be as effective as surgery or radiotherapy, but with fewer side effects. Ultrasound therapy destroys cancer cells in the prostate (illustrated) Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with around 47,000 cases every year. Treatments include surgery to remove the gland, or radiotherapy, which uses radiat...
Source: cookmedical.com  Jul 08, 2018
Cook Medical‘s Hemospray has been approved by the FDA for performing hemostasis during endoscopic procedures within the GI tract.   It uses the firm’s unique inorganic powder as the active agent, which turns into a gel when it meets blood. The gel stays put and keeps the blood from passing through the treatment area.   Since heat is not used for administering the powder, ...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 06, 2018
About 10 million Americans suffer from a tremor disorder such as Parkinson's disease. Insightec is an Israeli company backed by the Koch brothers that has developed a focused ultrasound technology to treat tremors. The company is in Phase 3 trials with the FDA for its technology to treat Parkinson's disease. Roughly 10 million people in the United States suffer from some sort of tremo...
Source: eus2018.org  Jul 06, 2018
The 21st International Symposium on Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS 2018) will be held in Bangkok, Thailand, on December 1 – 2, 2018. The intensive two-day EUS 2018 program will be comprised of several components including cutting-edge lectures, practical tutorials and round tables, live demonstrations of EUS procedure, leading experts who will present their findings in the field’s mos...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 05, 2018
French biotech Abivax’s might be on the verge of HIV cure and prevention discovery, after achieving a significant reduction of viral load patients during the first 28 days of treatment.   The company has announced results from the first group of patients in its most recent phase 2a trial testing the potential HIV cure treatment codenamed ABX464.   The study aimed at acc...
Source: SOAMVAC  Jul 02, 2018
Some post-surgical wounds, including following abdominal surgeries and mastectomies, may require suction drainage to prevent post operative complications due to edema and fluid collections. Suction bulbs have been common for the past few decades, since they don’t require external power and are very simple in design. New technologies can significantly improve this, as batteries have become mo...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 02, 2018
A novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method shows promise for noninvasively pinpointing sites of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), study is featured in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.   The U.S. Centers for Disease Contr...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 01, 2018
Researchers at the Kennedy Institute and Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, working with clinicians at NHS Lothian, have found that injection of the anti-TNF drug adalimumab into Dupuytren's disease nodules results in the reduction of the cell characteristics responsible for progression of Dupuytren's disease.   Based ...