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Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 23, 2019
Researchers from Washington School Of Medicine in St Louis have identified a set of genes involved in disposing cellular waste through a process known as autophagy that helps cells survive exposure to cytokines during sepsis. Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the body's immune response to infection spirals out of control. Bacteria or other pathogens in the bloodstream ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 22, 2019
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Wellcome Sanger Institute have  discovered that low doses of radiation equivalent to three CT scans, which are traditionally considered safe by the medical community, in reality actually gives cancer-capable cells a competitive advantage over normal cells in healthy tissue. It was discovered  that low doses of radiation increase the num...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 21, 2019
Endowed Professor  of Cardiovascular Medicine from the University Of California-Davis, Dr Nipavan Chiamvimonvat who has a long litany of professional and international awards and more than 135 medical research papers published, has once again with her team made another major discovery as to the actual mechanism as to how diabetes causes vascular disease. Prof Dr Nipavan Chiamvomonvat Toget...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 21, 2019
Having a shower or a bath ninety minutes before sleeping, in water that is between 40 to 42.7 degrees Celsius will not only help one to get to sleep but will also ensure that the quality of sleep is optimal, according to results of a study done by biomedical engineers at the University of Texas at Austin. By utilizing a process of  Systematic review protocols, a method used to search for a...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 20, 2019
Epilepsy is a central nervous system (neurological) disorder in which brain activity becomes abnormal, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior, sensations, and sometimes loss of awareness. Treatment with medications or sometimes surgery can control seizures for the majority of people with epilepsy, however some people require lifelong treatment to control seizures. The varying severity of ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 19, 2019
Messe Dusseldorf Asia, the organizers of the biennial Medical  Fair Thailand, announced  the initiation of a Medical Startup Park at its coming event in September at Bitec.  The Medical Startup Park will basically be a  showcase dedicated to Stage 3 and Stage 4 medical and innovative healthcare startup companies which are less than 4 years old with products that are ready to be...
Source: Thailand Medical News Exclusive  Jul 17, 2019
A relatively new strain of virus is emerging and is baffling medical researchers and health authorities all over the world. Since emerging in 2014, there has been an increase of Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) infections in individuals having had flu symptoms around the world with cases being reported in the US, Canada, Europe, China and also other parts of Asia.   AFM is a serious condition o...
Source :A Thailand Medical News Exclusive  Jul 16, 2019
Researchers at John Hopkins University School Of Medicine have uncovered the cellular pathway as to how the skin under stress due to conditions such as exposure to UV light, or even when exposed to lasers or physical stress such as abrasions or microneedling, regenerates itself. The key players are basically a group of loose RNa molecules known as self-noncoding double stranded RNA (dsRNA).  ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 16, 2019
The WHO has warned that dating apps and sexual health stigma are adding to more than a million new STD infections daily and driving a surge of untreatable superbug strains.There are currently more than 376 million new diagnoses a year of STDs like chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis and trichomoniasis among people under 50.   While most of these infections are treatable,...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 15, 2019
Kaffir lime or Citrus hystrix, a tropical fruit that is native to various parts of Asia including Thailand . Aside from its culinary uses, due to its uniquely tart and pleasant flavor, kaffir lime is also highly respected in traditional herbal medicine, due to its high content of beneficial organic compounds that can positively affect the body’s systems. The oil...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 14, 2019
Phase 3 Clinical Trial Of Using Bee Venom For Treating Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA) Shows Positive Results. Trials conducted by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities have shown that using Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) to treat knee osteoarthritis in more than 538 patients proved to be better than conventional histamines and with no side-effects. The bee venom were administered via dermal inj...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 13, 2019
A new research by in The Department of Molecular Microbiology at University of Plymouth, has shown that the C. difficile bacteria strain that is found in all hospitals around the world and causes infections to patients, is fast evolving and developing resistance to all known disinfectants coupled with the fact that is also now mutating, multiplying and spreading at faster speeds in whatever c...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 12, 2019
Headaches related to migraine affects about 14% of people, or more than a billion individuals worldwide. This chronic neurologic disorder involves periodic attacks of head pain coupled with symptoms that may include nausea as well as sensitivity to light and sound. 75% of migraine sufferers experience at least one migraine attack per month, and more than 50% are severely impaired during their atta...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 11, 2019
The NutriNet-Santé Study in France involving more than 101,257 healthy adults (21% men; 79% women) with an average age of 42 years, over a time span of 9 years, has yielded results linking higher consumption of sugary drinks and an increased risk of cancer. The findings add to a growing body of evidence indicating that limiting sugary drink consumption, together with taxation and marketing ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 09, 2019
Despite being around for more than a decade, Intravenous Vitamin Therapy is again coming back as a new wellness or regenerative fad that every celebrity, successful executive or socialite must have. Despite warnings from various medical regulatory boards from around the world about claims that can be made, a lot of greedy doctors and wellness clinics are using discreet modes to market these Vitami...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 09, 2019
The Medical Devices Asean 2019  exhibition returns for the second year, this time with even more exhibitors, conference programmes and newer and  exciting medical device innovations being showcased. The event is a must for all medical and healthcare professionals and also for distributors , retailers and also manufacturers of medical equiptment and devices and also for individuals inv...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 08, 2019
A Strain of intestinal bacteria whose benefits were discovered in 2007 by a FNRS-WELBIO Researcher, Patrice Cani and his team at the Louvain Drug Research Institute of  The Université Catholique de Louvain  in Belgium has been in the spotlight of the medical and pharma industry in the last few months.   Patrice in  collaboration with Professor Willem de Vos from Univers...
Source: UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS M. D. ANDERSON CANCER CENTER (proceedings from the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2019 ,Barcelona)  Jul 07, 2019
Globally, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. It is expected to cause about 1.8 million deaths during 2019. BRAF mutations are estimated to occur in up to 15 percent of patients with mCRC, with V600 being the most common BRAF mutation and representing a poor prognosis for these patients. Now Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center h...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 05, 2019
Researchers from the University of Surrey and Royal Surrey County Hospital have made a major breakthrough by treating bladder cancer patients with a type of common flu virus.The oncolytic ('cancer-killing') virus coxsackievirus (CVA21),has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer. The results of the study was published in the medical...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 04, 2019
Triclosan is an antibacterial and antifungal agent present in lots consumer products, including toothpaste, soaps, shampoos, mouth wash, hand sanitizers, detergents,even toys. Due to the risk of antimicrobial resistance that it causes and also its association with disrupted hormonal development, the US FDA banned its usage in consumer products in September 2017.However,in Asia, many health re...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 03, 2019
Electronic Cigarettes( ECs) or vapers such as Vuse and JUUL were initially introduced as safer alternatives to cigarettes and were often targeting youths and women. However, a latest study by a team from University Of California has found that that ECs are more dangerous and can damage brain stem cells and ultimately lead to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases and also accelerated aging. Br...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 02, 2019
Researchers from the Freie Universitat Berlin have confirmed that a phytosterol extract from spinach plants called ecdysterone, can be used to boost the performance of competitive athletes. The research was commissioned by the  World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to study the effects of ecdysterone, a kind of phytosteroid, on strength training. The findings of the research shows that ecdystero...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jul 01, 2019
A 65 year old study involving nearly 7,000 Norwegian patients with Multiple Sclerosis conducted by the Haukeland University in Norway indicates that individuals with MS have a greater overall risk of developing cancer than individuals without MS. The risk of cancer in respiratory organs, urinary organs and the central nervous system were exceptionally higher in them than others. The findings we...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 30, 2019
The US FDA has announced last week that certain models of insulin pumps made by Medtronic are being recalled due to potential cybersecurity risk that can make these devices vulnerable to hacking. Both the US FDA and Medtronic said that here has been not a known case so far of someone hacking an insulin pump but precautions are being taken to prevent such incidences. Medtronic commented in a let...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 29, 2019
A team of researchers and biomedical engineers from Duke University have created a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that could make the vision-saving technology available to many poorer areas in Asia and also worldwide. The newly redesigned 3-D-printed spectrometer scanner is 15 times lighter and smaller than current branded systems and cost less than one tenth the pri...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 28, 2019
Researchers from John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered that the incidence of gastrointestinal bloating was higher in individuals that consumed diets high in salt. Based on analysis of data from the largest clinical trial called DASH-Sodium (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-Sodium), the team from John Hopkins found that that high sodium intakes increased bloating ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 27, 2019
A recent study conducted by the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine covering over 150 products most commonly advertised on the internet as “T boosters” ie alternatives to traditional testosterone replacement therapy, do not have the ingredients to support their claims. Most males buying these products to improve their libido or to help build body mass are ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 26, 2019
Initially, dozens of generic versions of the drug Valsartan had been recalled since July 2018 when the carcinogenic chemical N-Nitrosodimethylamine, or NDMA, was detected in a version of the drug made by a Chinese company. However, since various recalls, more and more questionable discoveries are being made including the most recent development last week, in which  another carcinogenic compou...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 25, 2019
Anticholinergic drugs often prescribed by doctors to treat an array of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bladder conditions, allergies, gastrointestinal disorders and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. They help to contract and relax muscles. They work by blocking acetylcholine, a chemical that transmits signals in the nervous system. Researchers from the University ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 24, 2019
The US FDA has just approved approve a new medication for pre-menopausal women suffering from low libido.The female version of Viagra, Vyleesi is an injectable drug that is meant for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder or HSDD. HSDD was recognized in 2012, and research has shown that about 1 in 10 women is affected by it just before the onset of menopause and more patients suffer fr...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 23, 2019
Medical facilities in several countries have reported that a type of yeast called Candida auris has been causing severe illness in hospitalized patients. In some patients, this yeast can enter the bloodstream and spread throughout the body, causing serious invasive infections. C. auris can cause infections in a number of areas of the body, ranging from wounds to the ears t...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 22, 2019
New immunity cells known as CD11c+ dendritic cells have been identified by a team of researchers from The Westmead Institute For Medical Research in Sydney.These CD11c+ dendritic cells are extremely susceptible to the HIV virus and can transmit the virus to other cells especially the CD4 T Cells. These CD11c+ dendritic cells are a type of dendritic cells that play a role in capturing any i...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 21, 2019
A study conducted by the Swiss Tropical and Public Medicine Health Institute showed that nearly 48.2 percent of Cambodians were infected with threadworms (stronglyloides stercoralis) and this could be an issue for Thailand as many Cambodian migrants are employed in the country, not only in the construction trade but also as domestic maids or in the food industry. The threadworm infects humans t...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 20, 2019
Researchers from Washington University School Of Medicine have discovered that yoghurt consumption by men actually helps lower the risk of adenomas (abnormal growths) in the colon, which precedes the development of colon cancer. Yin Cao, ScD, MPH, lead researcher said in a telephone interview with Thailand Medical News,“Our findings provide novel evidence for the role of yogurt in early s...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 19, 2019
Researchers from Emory University have discovered that the anti-inflammatory drug called ketorolac, given prior to surgery, can promote long-term survival in animal models of cancer metastasis. The so-called "pro-resolution" therapies can also trigger the immune system to eliminate metastatic cells. The research also suggests that flanking chemotherapy with anti-inflammatory drugs can un...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 18, 2019
Pomegranate, a fruit famous  for its health benefits, contains phytochemicals called ellagitannins. When ingested, these molecules are converted into a compound called urolithin A (UA) in the human gut. Researchers from the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and also from EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne) found that UA can slow down the mitochondrial aging process. However not ev...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 17, 2019
Researchers from the University Of Virginia Cancer Center have discovered  a link between unhealthy or unbalanced gut microbiome( commensal dysbiosis) and aggressive metastatic breast cancer.   Dr Melanie Rutkowski, from the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology and also lead author in the study,  found that if the gut microbiome of animal models are altered, t...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 16, 2019
Polar lipids are the phospholids and glycolipids that are  functionally associated with the membrane structure and fluidity and are found in dairy products, especially in abundance in cream and buttermilk. They help to naturally stabilize fat droplets.   Researchers from The University of Lyon along from INRA and also other French  research entities initially conducted preliminary...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 15, 2019
Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal forms of cancer due to its resistance to traditional chemotherapy, but what is worrying is that the number of cases on pancreatic cancer is rising exponentially each year. Projections from the American Cancer Society indicates that about 45,000 people in the US alone and about 1.3 million people worldwide might die from this cancer this year alone , surp...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 14, 2019
Scientists from Rutgers University have developed a novel “Virtual Biopsy” device that can rapidly detect a skin lesion’s depth and determine whether it is malignant or not without the need for any surgical intervention. This ability to analyze a skin tumor non-invasively enables less risky and less distressing environments for patients. Photo credit: Rutgers University   ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 13, 2019
Researchers with multidisciplinary backgrounds from the University of California, Los Angeles have discovered a more effective method of detecting prostate cancer using a combination MRI (magnetic resonance imaging and also traditional ultrasound guided biopsy. Ultrasound Method   Ultrasound guided biopsy weakness is that it sometimes cannot clearly display the location of the tumors wherea...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 12, 2019
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and King’s College of London have identified the mechanism behind hardening of the arteries, and concluded in animal model studies that  minocycline, a generic medication normally used to treat acne could be an effective treatment for atherosclerosis.   Currently there is no treatment for hardening of the arteries, which is caused by bu...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 11, 2019
According to a new study by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a concerted public health programme in which effort to lower people's blood pressure, cut their sodium intake, and eliminate trans fat from their diet could dramatically reduce the incidence of premature death from cardiovascular disease (CVD)  and help prevent 94 million premature deaths due to cardiovascular diseases...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 10, 2019
Findings from the Rewind (Researching Cardiovascular Events with a Weekly Incretin in Diabetes) Trial by McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences , has indicated that the drug dulaglutide (brandname: Trulicity) reduced cardiovascular events and kidney problems in middle-aged and older people with Type 2 diabetes. The trial which was one of the largest of its kind involved more than 9,90...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 09, 2019
Results of a new global study by The  Friedman School Of Nutrition Science, Tuff University that were presented at the American Society For Nutrition 2019  Annual Meeting held at Baltimore on June 8th showed that inadequate fruit and vegetable intake accounted for millions of death from heart disease and strokes each year.   The study lead by Victoria Miller, a postdoctoral resear...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 08, 2019
PERSEPHONE , A new trial study by the University of Warwick and the University Of Cambridge has shown that shortening the duration of a therapy for breast cancer patients does not increase the risk of their cancer returning.   This trial addresses the issues of concerning reduction in the length of treatments and attendant toxicities and whether this can be achieved without any worsening of...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 07, 2019
Results from another new study, this time conducted by Washington University School Of medicine in St Louis indicates that people who use common heartburn drugs such as PPIs or proton pump inhibitors faced increased risk of dying from heart diseases, stomach cancer or kidney failure   The study involved more than 200,000 U.S. veterans. It's the latest to raise concerns over drugs called...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 06, 2019
A new discovery by a research team from Heidelberg University in Germany reveals that lowering serum cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN).  Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that occurs when an individual has diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerves throughout the body. Diabetic neuropathy most often ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 05, 2019
The US FDA has issued warnings that supplements containing Vinpocetine may pose a risk to women of childbearing age and even women planning to have children in the near future as it could lead to miscarriages or even harm the fetus despite consuming the supplement way before pregnancy.   Vinpocetine is a synthetic chemical resembling a phytochemical found in the periwinkle plant Vinca minor...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 04, 2019
Most HIV patients have a 60% risk of developing a form of cancer during their life-span. Cancers like Lymphoma, Lung Cancer, Anal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Oral and oropharyngeal cancer ,liver cancer, skin cancer and also Kaposi's sarcoma are most prevalent among HIV patients.  At the recent ASCO presentation, study led by doctors at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that pati...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 03, 2019
Findings of a study presented during the American Society Of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual 2019 Meeting(31st May to 4th  June)  in Chicago by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute showed that  Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, can improve outcomes for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC).   Analytical results of the ANZUP-led international r...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 02, 2019
Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in adults across the world, but the most  challenging aspect of the disease is that it often goes undetected until too much damage has been done and the person affected is already losing their vision. Most diabetics have few treatment options as the severity of the condition and vision loss worsens.   Regeneron Pharmaceuticals D...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 01, 2019
Scientists at Wake Forests School Of Medicine,North Carolina, conducted a therapeutic study of the effects of using non-thermal radio waves on liver cancer cells. The study concluded that the new targeted therapy has proven to be successful in blocking the growth of liver cancer cells anywhere in the body without damaging healthy cells   The research team headed by Boris Pasche, M.D., Ph.D....
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 01, 2019
Vascepa ( Icosapent Ethyl) by Amarin Group Of Companies, (New Jersey, US) is the only EPA prescription Omega-3 clinically proven to lower very high triglycerides in adults by 33%, without raising bad cholesterol (LDL-C). Unlike VASCEPA, common Omega Oil  and fish oil supplements  are not pure EPA and most also contain DHA which can raise bad cholesterol. The produc...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jun 01, 2019
One of the most common cancers affecting men globally is Prostate cancer, with a rising  rate of about 1 out of 8 men being inflicted. Due to the close anatomical association between the prostate and nearby organs, very often complications of prostate cancer treatment result in  urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction.   California-based Avenda Health has created a new la...
Source: Thaialnd Medical News  May 31, 2019
Researchers at the University of Toronto have made a discovery about the nature of neutrophils; the most numerous white blood cells in the body, that may lead to new models for diagnosing and tracking inflammatory diseases such as cancer, osteoarthritis and also auto-immune diseases.   Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood and is the first line o...
Source: BMJ  May 30, 2019
The BMJ published two major European studies that find positive associations between consumption of highly processed ("ultra-processed") foods and risk of cardiovascular disease and death. The researchers are calling for policies that promote consumption of fresh or minimally processed foods over highly processed foods. Ultra-processed foods include packaged baked goods and snacks, f...
Source: Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Biology (CCB)  May 29, 2019
Researchers in New York, leveraging on artificial intelligence techniques,  have demonstrated that mutations in so-called 'junk' DNA can cause autism .This study is the first to functionally link such mutations to the neurodevelopmental condition. Led by Olga Troyanskaya , deputy director for genomics at the Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Biology (CCB) in New Yor...
Source: US FDA  May 29, 2019
The U.S. FDA has approved Piqray (alpelisib) tablets, to be used in combination with the approved endocrine therapy fulvestrant, to treat postmenopausal women, and men, with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, PIK3CA-mutated, advanced or metastatic breast cancer (only as detected by an FDA-approved test) following progression on or after an end...
Source: 410 Medical  May 29, 2019
410 Medical, a Durham, North Carolina firm, has released a new version of its LifeFlow rapid infuser for treating infected patients during sepsis or shock. The LifeFlow Next Gen can safely deliver 500 ml of crystalloid fluid rapidly in less than two minutes, nearly four and a half times faster than when using a standard pressure bag. The device can be  operated with one hand and can be used w...
Source: Proceedings From European Society of Cardiology Annual 2019 Scientific Congress  May 28, 2019
The Fibre Study presented by Dr Cristiane Mayerhover, of Oslo University, at Heart Failure 2019, a recent scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), showed that patients who consume more dietary fibre tend to have healthier gut bacteria, which is associated with reduced risk of death or need of a heart transplant. Gut microbiota is composed of trillions of microorganisms t...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 27, 2019
Just take look at any Office Tower in Bangkok these days, and you will find either a Starbucks or some other knock off branded coffee outlets with a long queue of local office workers. Many of these office workers despite being on one of the lowest monthly salaries compared to any other well-developed cities around the world, can always be seen holding a cup of these coffee as a sort of status sym...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 26, 2019
Candida Albicans is opportunistic pathogenic yeasts that is found worldwide but most commonly compromises immunocompromised individuals  with serious diseases such as HIV and cancer. It is ranked as one of the most common groups of organisms that cause hospital-acquired infections especially with patients that have recently undergone surgery, a transplant ,in the Intensive...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 26, 2019
Thai-listed property company Pruksa Holdings PLC is set to open its first hospital in the Saphan Kwai vicinity by 2020.   The 250 bed is targetting the middle-class segment and is JCI accredited. Pruksa is investing a total of Bt 4.9 billion into this venture and is expecting to make profit in the third year of operations.   The hospital and healthcare market is getting extremely compe...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 25, 2019
There are more than 1.1 million new cases of men diagnosed with Prostate Cancer each year while about 310,000 of them die annually due to the disease. (Figures from Globoscan). Here Thailand Medical News brings you in summarized form, developments this week from across the globe with regards to prostate cancer research and developments for easy reading.     Biomaker, PSA contributes to...
Source: Thailand Medcial News  May 24, 2019
Fatty liver disease is a prevailing disease affecting around 17% of the global population  and  actually comprises of a variety of specific liver conditions that caused due to existing diabetic or obesity conditions. Very often individuals affected are not even aware in the initial stages till symptoms manifest itself in the later stages of the disease.   Its occurrence is more pr...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 23, 2019
Despite the advances in both Immunotherapy and  Targeted Medicine protocols for the treatment of cancer, Chemotherapy is still going to be the mainstay for the next decade or so for  most of Asia due to cost factors and also availability. In fact, statistical data shows the figure of chemotherapies would most likely double by 2025 in Asia from current  2019 levels. But what is tr...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 22, 2019
More HIV Patients dying from cryptococcal infections Latest Worldwide figures show that 1 out of 10 HIV related deaths are due  cryptococcal infections. .According to a study by Barcelona Institute for Global Health , the incidences of deaths due to the fungus is rising due to late detection and also because the fungus itself is mutating and presenting less obvious symptoms in the early...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 21, 2019
When a person experiences a heart attack (Myocardial Infarction), in most cases, heart muscles and other cells are damaged during the process as a result of blood stoppage to certain of these muscles and tissues during the event. Blood vessels in the heart are also damaged. These damaged muscle tissues can sometimes turn to become scar tissues. Damaged muscle tissue and damaged vessels in the hear...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 20, 2019
According to a study presented at the current ongoing European Society Of Endrocrinology Annual Meeting 2019 at Lyon, the number of male patients with increased complications and symptoms arising due to the misuse if steroids in increasing globally especially  in Asian countries where illegal steroids are easily available. Many males despite the health warnings associated with anabolic ster...
Exclusive: Thailand Medical News  May 19, 2019
A little known canine disease that has been around for eons and has the ability to pass to humans, is suddenly emerging in various countries with the latest outbreak in Marion County , Iowa. Cases are emerging in Canada, Australia, Britain and its believed that in Asia, the scenario could be more frightening as most medical and also veterinary  professionals are total oblivious and ignorant a...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 19, 2019
Despite the ongoing China and US trade war that has sent many stock markets into a tumble, US Biotech stocks are still looking promising as ever and will most probably be the most resilient stocks in  times of uncertainty. As usual, we are still staying away from Thai Stocks due to so much ongoing political uncertainties despite the elections and even with whatever government that comes into ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 19, 2019
Pueraria mirifica is a plant that grows in Thailand, India and other parts of Southeast Asia. For centuries, the roots of Pueraria mirifica have been used as a traditional Thai antiaging and rejuvenation medicine to promote youthfulness in women.   Relieves Menopausal Symptoms     One of the main phytochemicals found in Pueraria mirifica is a type of chemical that ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 18, 2019
Diabetes  affects about 442 million people worldwide (2019) and the figures keep rising with Thailand alone having more than 4.7 million people with diabetes.   Diabetes is the result when a person’s body is not able to produce enough insulin naturally (type 1 diabetes) or when the insulin produced is not efficiently used in the body (type 2 diabetes). Insulin is  produced i...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 18, 2019
The bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) is sexually transmitted and can cause inflammation of the urinary and genital tracts in men and women. This germ may also be linked to other problems, including some cases of arthritis and, in women, pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. MG appears to be spread by unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, as it can be detected in fluid sa...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 17, 2019
Fibromyalgia is one of the most common existing conditions causing chronic pain and disability. The economic impact of fibromyalgia worldwide is phenomenal -- in the U.S. alone, related health care costs linked to this condition is about $100 billion annually. Despite extensive research the cause of fibromyalgia is unknown, hence there is no specific diagnostics or therapies for this condition oth...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 16, 2019
A Study involving the analysis of a large databank of more than 466,039  individuals from a UK biobank by University Of Tulane in New Orleans led by Professor Lu Qi had their findings published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ ).   The findings indicated that glucosamine may have benefits in preventing CVD (Cardiovascular Disease) events, such as stroke and coronary heart disease bu...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 16, 2019
Bumrungrad International Hospital was recognized at the recent Global Heath and Travel Awards 2019 as being the Top Medical Tourism Hospital in Asia Pacific. The prestigious award ceremony was held recently in Kuala Lumpur and attended by top healthcare professionals from around the world. Bumrungrad’s VitalLife Wellness Center was named 2019 Integrated Healthcare Clinic of the Year in A...
Source: Thailand Medical News Exclusive  May 15, 2019
Stop taking daily low dose aspirin as a means to  prevent cardiovascular issues unless your doctor prescribes it, according to new guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA), as it can actually do more harm than good.   "We're talking about healthy people who don't have known heart disease or stroke, who migh...
Source: University Of Sydney  May 14, 2019
Breaking research by University Of Sydney  provides new evidence that nanoparticles in the form of food additives, which are present in many food items, have a substantial and harmful influence on human health and is a factor for many leading gastrointestinal diseases and even neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases.   The study investigated the health impacts of food additive E171 (...
Source: National News Bureau  May 13, 2019
Thailand’s Ministry of Commerce has implemented a new law after announcing medicine and medical supplies as controlled items, requiring hospitals to display pricings of more than  3,000 items via QR codes allowing the general public to make comparisons. Failure to comply with this law will result in up to 1 year imprisonment or up to 20,000 baht fine.   Ms. Chutima Bunyapraphasar...
Source: University Of Sydney  May 13, 2019
Scientists have found significant differences in the shape and biology of the same type of cell taken from different parts of the retina, according to a study in eLife. The results could help explain why the macula region of the eye is more susceptible to disease than the peripheral retina and reveals a protective mechanism that may be disrupted in disease.   The macula is a specialise...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 12, 2019
One of the largest of its kind, the study performed an untargeted metabolomics profile of over 1,200 participants  to identify metabolites linked to the hardening of arteries.   Hardening arteries, or arterial stiffness, is an independent risk factor for heart disease and death, and the mechanisms that contribute to arterial stiffening are not well understood.   That's where m...
Source: La Jolla Institute for Immunology, California  May 11, 2019
A new HIV vaccine delivery strategy appears to enhance the protective immune response in a preclinical model. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered that delivering an HIV vaccine in small doses over a series of days leads to a stronger immune response than when the same vaccine is given all at once.   A similar escalating dose method could be the best way...
Source: Harvard Medical School, Boston  May 10, 2019
Statin use may lower the risk for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), according to a study published online May 2 in JAMA Ophthalmology.   High cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of developing glaucoma, but a new study suggests taking statins to lower cholesterol helps to reduce this risk.   Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve, typic...
Source: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus  May 09, 2019
A mysterious epidemic of chronic kidney disease among agricultural workers and manual laborers may be caused by a combination of increasingly hot temperatures, toxins and infections, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. In recent years, chronic kidney disease has emerged as a major illness among workers in hot climates. It was first identified in the 1...
Source: Thailand Medical News  May 09, 2019
First Fertility Group, which comprises of its main clinic in Bangkok located at Rajdamri and also branch clinics in Cambodia and also elsewhere in the region, was recently the recipient of the Fertility Service Provider Of The Year in Asia Pacific by  Global Health and Travel (GHT). The Global Health & Travel Awards recognizes companies that have push boundary of delighting their custo...
Source: US FDA  May 08, 2019
If you have type 2 diabetes and are taking a newer class of medications to treat your disease—but one day you notice pain, redness and a foul odor in your genital area.If this happens, new research suggests you need to see your doctor immediately, because you may be suffering from Fournier gangrene. Also known as a "flesh-eating" disease, this infection attacks your genital or anal...
Source: Institute of Cancer Research, UK  May 07, 2019
Scientists have identified a gene mutation in the tumours of men with prostate cancer that is linked to very poor survival—and which could be used to pick out patients for more intensive treatment. Men with mutations in the retinoblastoma gene in their tumours were more than three times as likely to die and nearly seven times as likely to relapse on standard treatments as those without th...
Source: PLOS  May 06, 2019
Paromomysin-based topical treatments were shown to be effective in curing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), according to a randomized, double blind study conducted in Central America and published with PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Leishmaniasis, transmitted by a female phlebotomine sand fly bite, is endemic in 98 countries and has approximately 0.7 to 1.2 million CL cases each year. Infectio...
Source: Karolinska Institutet  May 05, 2019
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified blood-based biomarkers that may determine which patients will benefit from continued hormonal therapy for advanced prostate cancer. The researchers envision that this discovery may eventually result in a test that contributes to a more personalised treatment of the disease. Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer in Sweden. App...
Source: University of Oxford  May 04, 2019
The discovery of a new way to target and treat the leading genetic contributor to Parkinson's may open the way for a potential new clinical treatment. Researchers from Oxford's Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG) have identified how the dysfunction of a key gene, LRRK2, causes the neurons affected in Parkinson's to lose their ability to effectively clear out cell c...
Source: Rice University  May 03, 2019
Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues.   Bioprinting research from the lab of Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller featured a visually stunning proof-of-principle -- a scale-model of a lung-mimicking air sac with airways and blood vessels that never touch yet still provide oxygen to re...
Source: National Institutes of Health,US  May 02, 2019
Taking a folic acid supplement daily before pregnancy may reduce the risk of gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.    Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, or vitamin B9, which is found in leafy green vegetables, nuts, peas, beans and other foods. The U.S. Preventive Services T...
Source: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio  May 01, 2019
Results of a recently completed clinical trial of a potential drug to treat Type 2 diabetes in children were announced at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2019 meeting in Baltimore, Md.  Study coauthor Jane Lynch, M.D., FAAP, professor of pediatrics at UT Health San Antonio, said the drug, liraglutide, in combination with an existing medication, metformin, showed robust effect in treating chi...
Source: Acutus Medical  May 01, 2019
Acutus Medical, a California based company, won European clearance for its AcQMap contact mapping software. The company also won FDA approval for its second generation AcQMap platform .   The technology, used during cardiac ablation procedures, creates volumetric images of the atrial anatomy using ultrasound At the same time, contact-free charge density is used to generate high-definition 3...
Source: US FDA  May 01, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Benlysta (belimumab) intravenous (IV) infusion for treatment of children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - often referred to as simply "lupus" - a serious chronic disease that causes inflammation and damage to various body tissues and organs. This is the first time that the FDA has approved a treatment for pediatric patients with SLE...
Source: Medical University of South Carolina  May 01, 2019
Peppermint can help with the difficulty swallowing and non-cardiac chest pain experienced by some patients with disorders of the esophagus, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina. Of the 38 patients enrolled in the MUSC pilot study, 63 percent overall reported improvement of symptoms. Patients were recruited from the Esophageal Disorders Clinic at the MUSC Health Digestiv...
Source: Stanford University Medical Center  Apr 30, 2019
People suffering from a debilitating and often discounted disease known as chronic fatigue syndrome may soon have something they've been seeking for decades: scientific proof of their ailment. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have created a blood test that can flag the disease, which currently lacks a standard, reliable diagnostic test. "Too often, this diseas...
Source: Proceedings froms ESTRO 2019, Milan  Apr 29, 2019
A single high dose of radiation that can be delivered directly to the tumour within a few minutes is a safe and effective technique for treating men with low risk prostate cancer, according to a study presented at the ESTRO 38 conference. Radiotherapy traditionally involves a series of lower dose treatments that take place over several days or week. The new treatment is called high dose-rate br...
Source: Proceedings froms ESTRO 2019, Milan  Apr 28, 2019
For females with hormone-driven breast cancer, adding radiation to hormone therapy might keep their cancer from coming back for up to a decade, a new study finds. Breast cancer didn't come back in the same breast for 97.5% of women who had radiation therapy plus hormone therapy compared to just over 92% of women who had hormone therapy alone, the researchers said. In addition, over the stu...
Source: Uppsala University  Apr 27, 2019
Many diabetes patients do not only have problems with their insulin, but also with the release of the hormone glucagon. Researchers at Uppsala University have now discovered a regulation mechanism which could provide an opportunity to improve blood glucose control in these patients. The hormone glucagon, which is released from alpha cells in the pancreas, plays a vital role in blood glucos...
Source: Sanofi  Apr 27, 2019
French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi on Friday said the European Medicines Agency had conditionally approved its anti-cancer drug Libtayo, the first drug of its kind to be authorised for use in the EU. The drug, also known as CEMIPLIMAB-RWLC is used for for treatment of Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma The tumour-reducing drug is aimed at patients with the second most common form of ski...
Source: Thomas Jefferson University  Apr 26, 2019
A new colorectal cancer vaccine showed positive results in the phase 1 clinical trial to demonstrate that the approach is safe. The patients treated had no signs of serious adverse events and samples of their blood contained markers of immune activation—an early indication that the vaccine could activate immune cells to fight colorectal tumors and metastases. Further tests to determine if th...
Source: European Society of Cardiology  Apr 25, 2019
Women who take antibiotics over a long period of time are at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, according to research carried out in nearly 36,500 women.   The study found that women aged 60 or older who took antibiotics for two months or more had the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease, but long duration of antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk if taken ...
Source: American College of Physicians  Apr 24, 2019
In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) clinical trial and its long-term follow-up study, among the persons who lost at least 5 percent of their body weight during the first year, long-term maintenance of weight loss was more likely if they had been assigned to treatment with metformin than with placebo or lifestyle intervention. Being older and losing a greater amount of weight in the first year...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Apr 23, 2019
Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Asia and has dramatically increased the risk of premature death, especially among women and middle-aged people, a multinational study led by Vanderbilt University researchers has found. There is an urgent need to implement diabetes management programs tailored to Asian populations."We found that patients with diabetes are at a substant...
Source: University of Pennsylvania  Apr 22, 2019
Whether a wound -- such as a diabetic foot ulcer -- heals or progresses to a worse outcome, including infection or even amputation, may depend on the microbiome within that wound. A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found specific strains of the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are associated with wounds that do not heal. Researc...
Source: MOPH  Apr 22, 2019
The Thai Food and Drug Administration has announced that Self  HIV Test Kits are now available for all to purchase at participating pharmacy outlets. Dr Tares Krassanairawiwong, the FDA Secretary general also said that individuals that have positive reactive  test should immediately contact a doctor or nearby medical hospital of licensed clinic to get appropriate medical advice There ...
Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center  Apr 21, 2019
About one in seven women in the world will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. The vast majority of these cancers depend on the hormone estrogen to grow. Estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer tumors are frequently treated with the drug tamoxifen, which blocks the hormone's effect on the tumor. However, many tumors eventually become resistant to tamoxifen, allowing cancer to recur o...
Source: The Ohio State University  Apr 20, 2019
Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have developed a novel stroke therapy that, when tested in mice and dogs, has proven superior to the standard of care therapy now offered to patients suffering a stroke. "We have shown that our drug, which is completely reversible, opens up a blocked blood vessel better than the...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Apr 20, 2019
From new toxins to new thoughts on duration of effect to micro injections, the toxin market is growing in dermatology.(exclusive interview with Dr . Michael Gold)   The toxin market is growing for aesthetic indications, and patient interest continues to soar. But in addition to a growing market, Dr. Michael Gold, a leading Dermatologists in the US  says there are other trends to watch....
Source: Oregon Health & Science University  Apr 19, 2019
A scientific breakthrough provides new hope for millions of people living with multiple sclerosis. Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have developed a compound that stimulates repair of the protective sheath that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.   The discovery, involving mice genetically engineered to mimic multiple sclerosis, published in the journal&nbs...
Source: NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,US  Apr 18, 2019
Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, according to a report published online today in The New England Journal of Medicine. Results of the Phase 2, open-label study indicate the antibody, known as UB-42...
Source: University Of Otago  Apr 17, 2019
Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that. Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in...
Source: Stanford Medicine  Apr 16, 2019
A new landmark clinical trial shows that a drug lowers the risk of kidney failure by a third in people with Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. "For the first time in 18 years, we have a therapy for patients with Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease that decreases kidney failure," said Kenneth Mahaffey, MD, professor of medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and co...
Source: University of California - San Diego  Apr 15, 2019
Inflammation is a balanced physiological response -- the body needs it to eliminate invasive organisms and foreign irritants, but excessive inflammation can harm healthy cells, contributing to aging and chronic diseases. To help keep tabs on inflammation, immune cells employ a molecular machine called the NLRP3 inflammasome. NLRP3 is inactive in a healthy cell, but is switched "on" when ...
Source: American Society of Nephrology  Apr 14, 2019
New research reveals that pruritus, or itchy skin, affects a substantial percentage of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study, which appears in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology(CJASN), also indicates which patients are more likely to experience pruritus, and demonstrates that pruritus may affect quality of life and sleep. In stu...
Source: University of Edinburgh   Apr 13, 2019
Researchers say patients should continue to take the drugs, which are commonly prescribed to older men, but warn they may need additional health checks. The team stressed that current treatment guidelines do not need to change, based on their study of patient health records. Men with enlarged prostates are commonly prescribed drugs called 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors that reduce the production ...
Source: University Of Michigan  Apr 12, 2019
Human papillomavirus infection rates are increasing in women born after 1980 who did not receive the HPV vaccine—putting them at higher risk for HPV-related cancers, according to a University of Michigan study. While more than 90 percent of HPV-related cancers are preventable, HPV causes more than 40,000 cases of cancer in the United States each year and about 1.8 million cases globally, ...
Source: Pasteur Institute  Apr 11, 2019
Hepatitis B is a viral liver infection that can lead to acute or chronic conditions. Although there is a vaccine that offers protection against the virus, current treatments which prevent the virus from replicating are not curative for infected individuals. Scientists at the Institut Pasteur working in collaboration with the CNRS have demonstrated that a cellular protein is capable of acting as a ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Apr 10, 2019
Dealing with multinational insurance companies can often be a nightmare proposition in Thailand, for expats and tourists alike. Provider networks are often limited. Insured patients must usually pay bills upfront with the promise of reimbursement by the insurer later, which either comes months later or not at all. Necessary medical care is often denied because of technicalities.  Structural ...
Source: The Translational Genomics Research Institute  Apr 09, 2019
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a long medical name for the most common form of liver cancer, a malignancy whose incidence has nearly doubled over the past decade, making it the fastest growing type of cancer in the U.S., and the third-leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, provide the...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Apr 08, 2019
This article has been specially commissioned by Thailand Medical News to bring about awareness and also create caution about the excessive usage of PPIs (Proton Pump Inhibitors) that is over prescribed currrently in Thailand to treat acid reflux conditions. A recent landmark population study by US researchers at the University of California -- San Diego has indicated that Proton pump inhibitors...
Source: University of Michigan  Apr 07, 2019
A potential new immune-based therapy to treat precancers in the cervix completely eliminated both the lesion and the underlying HPV infection in a third of women enrolled in a clinical trial. The shot, a therapeutic vaccine, injects a specific protein that triggers an immune system response to attack high-risk HPV types that cause nearly all cervical cancer precursors, known as cervical intraep...
Source: McGill University  Apr 06, 2019
Researchers have known  that inflammation accompanies Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain lesions. Several early studies suggested that "super-aspirins" or Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) could help avoid the disease. However, after clinical trials showed that NSAIDs don't help patients who already have AD symptoms, doctors wondered whether these drugs could still be...
Source: The London School of Medicine (Blizard Institute)  Apr 05, 2019
A recent research found that long-term cotrimoxazole treatment reduces mortality and morbidity in children with HIV by altering their gut microbiome and immune activation. The finding supports current WHO guidelines, which recommend long-term cotrimoxazole treatment for all HIV-positive people living in areas where malaria and severe bacterial infections are common. Previous studies have shown...
Source: Case Western Reserve University   Apr 04, 2019
Probiotics typically aim to rebalance bacteria populations in the gut, but new research suggests they may also help break apart stubborn biofilms. Biofilms are living microbial communities—they provide a haven for microbes and are often resistant to antibiotics. A new study describes a specific probiotic mix that could help patients with gastrointestinal diseases avoid harmful biofilms that ...
Source: American Geriatics Society  Apr 03, 2019
Acetaminophen (otherwise known by brand names such as Tylenol) is one of the most widely used pain relievers. Almost 60 years of widespread use have made acetaminophen a household product. It's distributed over the counter (OTC) in most countries and judged safe by the scientific community. However, acetaminophen is also one of the most common medications involved in overdoses (the medical ter...
Source: Brigham and Women's Hospital  Apr 02, 2019
Food allergies, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diarrhea and other gastrointestinal diseases have something in common: all have been linked to epithelial barrier loss. The gut epithelial barrier—that critical lining of cells in the gut that must allow nutrients into the body while keeping food-borne microbes out—can be compromised during intestinal inflammation and ca...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Apr 02, 2019
Siriraj Hospital in Thailand, lead by Dr Vuthinun Achariyapota announced at the recent Society Of Gynecologic Cancers (SGO) Annual Meeting 2019 in Hawaii of a new novel approach of detecting HPV via urine samples. HPV Virus   The group from Siriraj Hospital initially conducted a study from a sample size of about 96 women. In the study, two methods of detecting high-grade squamous intraepith...
Source: France’s Institut Cochin, Paris   Apr 01, 2019
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in France has found that a class of antipsychotic drugs known as phenothiazines was successful in treating a form of meningitis in mice when used with antibacterial agents. In their paper published in the journal Nature Microbiology, the group describes experiments they conducted with meningitis mouse models and what they found. M...
Source: University Of California, Santa Barbara  Mar 31, 2019
Dementia — an umbrella term for various neurodegenerative conditions involving memory loss and other forms of cognitive impairment — is hard to treat because its causes remain unknown. Researchers, however, are making painstaking progress.     Dr. Kenneth Kosik, the Harriman Professor of Neuroscience at the University of California (UC), Santa Barbara recently led a team of ...
Source: American Thoracic Society  Mar 30, 2019
Dietary intake of two fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6, may have opposite effects on the severity of asthma in children and may also play opposite roles in modifying their response to indoor air pollution, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. In "Omega-3 and Omega-6 Intake Modifies...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Mar 29, 2019
A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.   The investigators found that in addition to its known ability to block the production of cell growth compounds, the drug DFMO (difluoromethylornithine, known also as Eflornithine and...
Source: American Academy Of Neurology  Mar 28, 2019
Women who start their period later, go through menopause earlier or have a hysterectomy may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study by the American Academy of Neurology. The study found a link between increased risk of dementia and fewer total reproductive years when women are exposed to higher levels of estrogen hormones.   "Since women are 50 percent more...
Source: University of California, Los Angeles  Mar 27, 2019
More than half of the people in the world host colonies of a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori in their stomachs. Although it's harmless to many, H. pylori can cause stomach cancer as well as ulcers and other gastric conditions. Doctors tend to prescribe multiple antibiotics to defeat the microbe, but that strategy can lead to antibiotic-resistant superbugs. Now, a finding by UCLA scient...
Source: Boston University School of Medicine  Mar 26, 2019
Researchers have identified a biomarker and a possible new therapy for melanoma.   Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a protein that plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the melanocyte ( cells that make melanin) lineage, differentiation of normal and malignant melanocytes and the survival of melanoma cells.   "We have now detected the first useful chemi...
Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center  Mar 25, 2019
UT Southwestern researchers have identified two proteins that act as gatekeepers to dampen a potentially life-threatening immune response to chronic infection. The proteins -- the transcription factors SIX1 and SIX2 -- activate cellular pathways required for fetal development and later switch to a new role in which they repress these pathways in adult immune system cells.  "This work...
Source: Proceedings From ENDO 2019, Endocrine Society Annula Meeting in new Orleans, LA.  Mar 24, 2019
Using the hemoglobin A1c blood test to diagnose diabetes tends to underestimate the prevalence of the disease, according to a new study  presented on Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.   "Based on our findings, A1c should not be solely used to determine the prevalence of diabetes," said lead researcher Maria Me...
Source: Mayo Clinic  Mar 23, 2019
Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers.  While therapies have been available to treat some forms of liver disease, including hepatitis C and autoimmune hepatitis, options have been more limited for treating portal hypertension, a conditio...
Source: Baylor College of Medicine  Mar 22, 2019
Does sugar directly feed cancers, boosting their growth? The answer seems to be 'Yes' at least in mice according to a study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medicine. Their study showed that consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup -- the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily -- accelerates the...
Source: University Of Massachusetts  Mar 21, 2019
Brazilian researchers have discovered that a drug regularly prescribed to control cholesterol can also be used to treat cachexia, or wasting syndrome, a condition characterized by rapid weight loss and muscle atrophy associated with extreme physical weakness. This condition is common among patients with chronic diseases such as cancer, heart failure and AIDS.   "Our goal is to underst...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Mar 20, 2019
Noninvasive treatment improves memory and reduces amyloid plaques. By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.     This noninvasive treatment, which works by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations, also greatly reduced the nu...
Source: UB School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  Mar 19, 2019
Common medications prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and ulcers are linked to increased risks for kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, found a recent University at Buffalo study. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), a group of drugs that reduce the production of stomach acid, increases the risk of chronic kidney disease by 20 percent and raises the risk of kidney f...
Source: Intermountain Medical Center,US  Mar 18, 2019
About six million people come into an emergency department every year with chest pain, but not all of them are having a heart attack -- and many are not even at risk or are at very low risk for having one. Now, a new research study presented at the American College Cardiology Scientific Sessions from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that identifying the prese...
Source: George Washington University  Mar 17, 2019
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center found that the enzyme USP15 could potentially lead to new treatments for breast and pancreatic cancer. Their findings were published in Nature Communications. "With this study, we validate the role of USP15 in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression and inform novel treatments for breast cancer," said H...
Source: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  Mar 16, 2019
Fewer than half of ovarian cancer patients survive until five years after diagnosis. According to the American Cancer Society, this is because only about one-fifth of ovarian cancer cases are detected early, when the chances of successful treatment and recovery are highest.   "If we could change this reality by detecting ovarian cancer at a curable stage, we could save many lives,"...
Source: University of British Columbia  Mar 15, 2019
A new treatment for a common type of stroke may soon be possible, thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia. In a study published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers successfully used a new approach that significantly minimized brain damage caused by stroke in mouse models. The new approach works by target...
Source: British Medical Journal  Mar 14, 2019
The blood test used to diagnose a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) in patients admitted to hospital can be misleading, warn researchers in a study published by The BMJ. Of 20,000 consecutive patients undergoing blood tests at University Hospital Southampton, one in 20 had levels of troponin (a protein released into the bloodstream during a heart attack) greater than the manu...
Source: Duke University  Mar 13, 2019
A vaccine developed by Duke Cancer Institute researchers has shown early promise in targeting the HER2 protein that fuels a deadly form of breast cancer.   In a phase 1 clinical trial that enrolled 22 women with recurrent cancers that overexpress the HER2 protein, the vaccine demonstrated an ability to halt tumor growth and improve survival for a subset of patients. A phase 2 trial is ...
Source: Duke University Medical Center  Mar 12, 2019
A quick eye exam might one day allow eye doctors to check up on both your eyeglasses prescription and your brain health.   A study of more than 200 people at the Duke Eye Center publishing March 11 in the journal Ophthalmology Retina suggests the loss of blood vessels in the retina could signal Alzheimer's disease.   In people with healthy brains, microscopic bl...
Source: American College Of Cardiology  Mar 11, 2019
There's now another reason to get your yearly flu shot. Not only can it protect you from the body aches, fever and fatigue associated with a bout of influenza, it may even prevent you from having a heart attack, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. The study of nearly 30 million hospital records shows that people who ...
Source: Columbia University, Irving Medical Center   Mar 10, 2019
Researchers at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine have determined how F. nucleatum-- a common oral bacteria often implicated in tooth decay -- accelerates the growth of colon cancer.  The findings could make it easier to identify and treat more aggressive colon cancers. It also helps explain why some cases advance far more quickly than others, thanks to the same bacter...
Source: University Of Queensland  Mar 09, 2019
New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide with about 150 million cases each year, and can lead to serious conditions such as kidney infection and sepsis. A team of cross-institutional ...
Source: Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America  Mar 08, 2019
Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Clostridioides di...
Source: University of Southern California  Mar 07, 2019
A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say. Researchers emphasize that the study, recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, was in mice, and many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments. Nevertheless, the findings lend credence t...
Source: University of Southern California  Mar 06, 2019
USC researchers provided evidence that a low-calorie "fasting-mimicking" diet has the potential to reduce inflammation and repair the gut. Published in a recent  edition of Cell Reports, the study reports on the health benefits of periodic cycles of the diet for people with inflammation and indicated that the diet reversed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patholo...
Source: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore  Mar 05, 2019
Many Americans take a daily low-dose aspirin to protect their hearts. Now it appears aspirin may also reduce flare-ups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a study of COPD sufferers, researchers found that aspirin was linked to fewer moderate exacerbations, but not severe bouts, of the lung disease. It also reduced moderate and severe episodes of labored breathing. ...
Source: University of Luxembourg  Mar 04, 2019
Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalised stem cells improve the regeneration of injured or diseased areas in the brain of old mice. The researchers expect that their approach will provide fresh impetus in r...
Source: Tufts University  Mar 03, 2019
The World Cancer Research Fund reports that 30 to 50 percent of cancer cases are preventable, and it is important to focus on stopping cancer from developing in the first place. Many natural foods contain a variety of antioxidants and phytochemicals that possess the capability of preventing cancer from developing coupled with a proper lifestyle. Xiang-Dong Wang, a senior scientist and associate...
Source: AstraZeneca  Mar 03, 2019
AstraZeneca and MSD have announced positive results from the Phase III POLO trial, in which there was a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with Lynparza (olaparib) for pancreatic cancer, making it the first PARP inhibitor to demonstrate benefit in the disease. The drug is a first-in-class PARP inhibitor, and the first targeted trea...
Source: Alphatec Inc, California  Mar 03, 2019
Alphatec Inc based in California, recently obtained  US FDA clearance for the SafeOp automated neuromonitoring system for use in real-time intraoperative nerve location and assessment. The system relies on somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and and electromyography (EMG) as the two complementary modalities, one for evaluating the functionality of nerves and the other their locati...
Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham  Mar 02, 2019
In a paper recently published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, researchers examined the effect of vaginal tenofovir 1 percent gel use on the risk of acquiring herpes simplex virus type 2, or HSV-2. The study was conducted through a secondary analysis of data from the VOICE study. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one in six Americans ages 14 to 49...
Source: University of Pittsburgh  Mar 01, 2019
A single misbehaving protein -- called TDP-43 -- is behind 97 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and 45 percent of frontotemporal dementia diagnoses. It also is found in 80 percent of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and 60 percent of Alzheimer's disease cases. Now, University of Pittsburgh researchers have found a way to trap TDP-43 so it doesn't form toxic clumps that c...
Source: University of Michigan  Feb 28, 2019
A protein molecule called EZH2,  known to play a role in cancer may also be increasing fibrosis in scleroderma patients. Studies and researches that have been made show that Scleroderma, a rare chronic autoimmune disease, causes difficulties during breathing, exhaustion and most concerningly hardens the internal organs and the skin. “Tissues and organs are damaged due to the di...
Source: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia  Feb 27, 2019
New preclinical findings from extensive cell and animal studies suggest that a drug already used for a rare kidney disease could benefit patients with some mitochondrial disorders -- complex conditions with severe energy deficiency for which no proven effective treatments exist. Future clinical research is needed to explore whether the drug, cysteamine bitartrate, will meaningfully benefit patient...
Source: Indiana University, US  Feb 26, 2019
A breakthrough test developed by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers to measure pain in patients could help stem the tide of the opioid crisis in Indiana, and throughout the rest of the nation. A study led by psychiatry professor Alexander Niculescu, MD, PhD and published this week in the Nature journal Molecular Psychiatrytracked hundreds of participants at the Richard L. Ro...
Source: University of Virginia Health System  Feb 25, 2019
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition. The p...
Source: Rutgers University  Feb 24, 2019
A Rutgers study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. The study, which was published in the journal Nature Communications, identified the NSD2 gene through a computer algorithm developed to determine which cancergenes that spread in a&n...
Source: Vanderbilt University  Feb 24, 2019
A well-known, four-year study found popular arthritis drug Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs in its same classification - commonly called NSAIDs. Now, a big-data analysis of patient records at Vanderbilt University has found a link specifically between Celebrex and heart valve calcification. W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering, and Ph.D. student Megan ...
Source: Vanderbilt University  Feb 23, 2019
Verticilide, an extract from the genus of fungus Verticillium, commonly found on plants and insects, is a promising compound to treat arrhythmia according to a research from a collaboration between Vanderbilt University professors of chemistry and medicine. Jeffrey Johnston, Stevenson Professor of Chemistry, said the natural product isn't active except in insects, but the synthetic mirror-i...
Source: University of California - Riverside  Feb 22, 2019
Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. This debilitating condition periodically shutters communication between the brain and other parts of the body, resulting in symptoms that range from numbness and tingling in the arms and legs to blindness and paralysis. While treatments are available to alleviate inflammation, no therapies exist to pro...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 21, 2019
Doctors In Thailand practicing primary care medicine in 2019 have likely met this familiar greeting from a patient: “I Googled my symptoms and I think the problem is [insert condition].” Obviously, this can be unsettling for many providers – doctors in the past were often the first point of reference for patients who otherwise had no way of researching their health concerns on th...
Source: San Diego School Of Medicine  Feb 20, 2019
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which include well-known brand names Prilosec, Miracid, Nexium and Prevacid, are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the world. Approximately 10 percent of adults in the United States take these drugs for frequent heartburn, acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Given their prevalence, researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutic...
Source: University Of Melbourne  Feb 19, 2019
Scientists from the University Of Melbourne said  on Monday that they had discovered immune cells that can fight all known flu viruses in what was hailed as an "extraordinary breakthrough" that could lead to a universal, one-shot vaccine against the killer disease. Influenza epidemics, largely seasonal, kill hundreds of thousands of people each year, according to the World Health...
Source: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute  Feb 18, 2019
A combination of two drugs -- one of them an immunotherapy agent -- could become a new standard, first-line treatment for patients with metastatic kidney cancer, says an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial. Patients who received the immunotherapy drug avelumab plus axitinib, a targeted agent, had a significant advantage in progression-...
Source: NRG Oncology, Pennsylvania  Feb 17, 2019
The NRG Oncology clinical study NRG-RTOG 0415 determined that a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule (H-RT), a treatment schedule that delivers a total dose of radiotherapy over a shorter period of time, is not worse than the conventional radiotherapy schedule (C-RT) in terms of bowel, bladder, sexual, and general quality of life (QOL) as well as anxiety and depression for men with low risk pros...
Source: St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre  Feb 17, 2019
A new technique using patients' own modified cells to treat Crohn's disease has been proven to be effective in experiments using human cells, with a clinical trial of the treatment expected to start in the next six months. Researchers at the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) developed the technique by studying white blood cells taken from patients who ha...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 17, 2019
Updated treatment guidelines and the availability of the ResistancePlus GC test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, from SpeeDx Inc, Sydney, Australia, are making it possible for some UK patients with gonorrhea to be treated with the cheap and easily-administered oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin.    Ciprofloxacin was the first-line antibiotic of choice for uncomplicated gonorrhea in the ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 17, 2019
Multiple therapies involving ablative and nonablative techniques have been developed for rejuvenation of photodamaged skin. Monopolar radiofrequency (RF) is emerging as a gentler, nonablative skin-tightening device that delivers uniform heat to the dermis at a controlled depth.   In a recent study done by Dr Moetaz El-Domyati, Head of Dermatologists at Minia University, Egypt in collaborati...
Source: University of Exeter  Feb 16, 2019
Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke and vascular dementia.   Led by the University of Exeter and funded by the British Heart Foundation, the team has developed a new technique  that allows ...
Source: Oregon Health and Science University  Feb 16, 2019
A team of researchers from Oregon Health and Science University has concluded from an extensive study involving a medicinal plant called Centella Asiatica, commonly known as Gotu Kola (in thai: bua bok ) is effective in terms of improving memory especially in the elderly and those afflicted with cognitive related diseases. Centella Asiatica  contains a variety of phyto chemicals such ...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 16, 2019
Twelve patients who tried injections of stem cells were hospitalized with infections, according to a report in the New York Times that should cause patients concern. More important is that they should investigate stem cell treatments, for conditions such as cartilage injuries to their joints, before committing to one of these procedures. It's also a valuable reminder that physic...
Source: University of Virginia  Feb 15, 2019
An antidepressant drug used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder could save people from deadly sepsis, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. Sepsis is a significant cause of death around the world. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Infection calls it "the body's extreme response to an infection." Essentially, the body's immune re...
Source: University Hospital Basel   Feb 15, 2019
There is a higher risk of fragility bone fracture for people with diabetes, and a new study was able to identify a key factor specific to type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. The study in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism reports that poor glucose control significantly reduces the risk, in T1D patients, of a fall from standing height or less t...
Source: ETH Zurich University  Feb 15, 2019
In recent years, the number of targeted cancer drugs has continued to rise. However, conventional chemotherapeutic agents still play an important role in cancer treatment. These include platinum-based cytotoxic agents that attack and kill cancer cells. But these agents also damage healthy tissue and cause severe side effects. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now identified an approach that allows fo...
Source: George Mason University   Feb 15, 2019
George Mason University's Yuntao Wu is the lead scientist on a research team that has identified a measurable indicator that could prove instrumental in the fight against HIV. The research focuses on cofilin, a key protein that regulates cells to mobilize and fight against infection. In an HIV-infected patient, cofilin dysfunction is a key factor in helper T cell defects, according to the ...
Source: University of Leicester  Feb 14, 2019
Results from a phase II clinical trial, experimental work on cells and computational modelling have together shown why the first pill for asthma in 20 years can help reduce asthma attacks. Researchers from Leicester (UK) and Vancouver (Canada) have shown that the investigational drug, Fevipiprant (an oral, selective prostaglandin D2 receptor antagonist), reduces the amount of smooth muscle in t...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 14, 2019
As in much of the rest of the developed and middle-income nations, diabetes is creating a public health crisis in Thailand. Doctors face a complicated set of challenges related to the illness – not only in how to treat those already affected, but how to prevent the debilitating disease moving into the future. Measures such as proper dietary education and the promotion of exercise, especially...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 14, 2019
A variety of health trackers, including the Apple Watch, offer consumers the ability to record their ECG signals. Though the claims about these offerings are mostly accurate, they may be misleading to those that believe these devices mimic the capabilities of in-hospital ECGs. In reality, wrist-worn and other wearable ECG monitors are only single-lead devices that can pretty much only detect easy ...
Source: University of Cambridge/ University of Leicester  Feb 13, 2019
A blood test has been developed that could save countless lives by improving early detection of lung cancer. The test measures circulating DNA that is shed by cancer cells as they grow and multiply. Scientists believe it could predict the presence of low-grade tumours in the lungs long before they become a threat.   New research led by scientists at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Toxico...
Source: Stanford University School of Medicine  Feb 12, 2019
An antibody-based treatment can gently and effectively eliminate diseased blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow to prepare for the transplantation of healthy stem cells, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The researchers believe the treatment could circumvent the need to use harsh, potentially life-threatening chemotherapy or radiati...
Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center  Feb 11, 2019
Lightheadedness with standing, otherwise known as postural lightheadedness, results from a gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults. While mild in many adults, it has been cited as an important contributing factor in some harmful clinical events, such as falls. As a result, greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving f...
Source: The Institute of Cancer Research, London  Feb 10, 2019
A brand new type of cancer drug that acts as a ‘Trojan horse’ to get inside tumour cells has shown promise in patients with six different cancer types. In patients with advanced, drug-resistant cancers, over a quarter with cervical and bladder tumours, and nearly 15 per cent with ovarian and lung tumours, responded to the new treatment. The innovative new drug, called tisotumab ved...
Source: Duke University Medical Center  Feb 09, 2019
The use of MRI to determine heart function has been slow to catch on, but a study from Duke Health researchers shows that stress cardiac MRI not only diagnoses disease, but can also predict which cases are potentially fatal. Results from a large, multi-center study suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance, or CMR, has potential as a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, ...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Feb 08, 2019
An MIT-led research team has developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin, potentially replacing the injections that people with type 2 diabetes have to give themselves every day. An MIT-led research team has developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin. Credit: Felice Frankel About the size of a blueberry, the capsule contains a s...
Source: University Of Waterloo  Feb 07, 2019
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new way to prevent and treat Chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection in the world. Chlamydia in a human cell. The new treatment differs from the traditional anti-biotic treatment as it is a type of gene therapy that is delivered via nanotechnology and is showing a 65 per cent success rate in preventing c...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 07, 2019
Thailand’s PrEP Implementation Progress With Exclusive Interview Comments From Professor Andrew Grulich – The Kirby Institute, UNSW, Sydney PrEP implementation was a very hot, challenging topic at the 21st Bangkok International Symposium on HIV Medicine 2019 organised by HIV-NAT. The Symposium was held at The Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre, January 16-18th.. The latter par...
Source: Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem (INBEB), Brazil  Feb 07, 2019
Scientists explored mRNA and protein public databases to unravel hidden meanings of the genetic code. Using a metric derived from mRNA codon composition, they found out how gene sequence choice can predict different aspects of protein synthesis, such as protein production efficiency. The study could help the development of new biotechnological applications of genes and proteins. Today, thousand...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Feb 06, 2019
Mutations that cause esophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) have been mapped in unprecedented detail -- unveiling that more than half could be targeted by drugs currently in trials for other cancer types. This research, published  in Nature Genetics, could help stratify esophageal cancer patients to give them more personalised therapies. This could provide options not currently available to ...
Source: Stanford University School of Medicine  Feb 06, 2019
In rheumatoid arthritis, immune cells called helper T cells behave differently from their counterparts in healthy cells and in other autoimmune diseases. Stanford scientists have learned why. Stanford University School of Medicine investigators succeeded in countering inflammation and tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis in mice engrafted with human joint-lining tissue and...
Source : American Physiological Society.  Feb 06, 2019
Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology -- Renal Physiology.   Zinc deficiency is common in people with chronic illnesses such as type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. People with low zinc levels are also at a higher risk for hyper...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 06, 2019
Fat is complicated. It's stubborn, demonized, praised, misunderstood. As the recent wave of body positive conversations has helped to scratch at, everyone's relationship with fat is different. One thing that has remained fairly consistent is a cultural obsession with mastering fat — whether that means embracing it, or erasing it. As far as the latter is concerned, plastic surgery ha...
Source: Friedrich-Alexander Universitat(FAU),Germany  Feb 05, 2019
More than 4000,000 people in Germany are affected by the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases Morbus Crohn or ulcerative colitis. Patients often suffer from flare-ups, which damage intestinal tissue. In spite of tremendous advances in treating the diseases with medication, the chronic inflammation still cannot be kept sufficiently in check for a number of patients. Until now, little has been known ...
Source: McGill University  Feb 05, 2019
Two new papers, published simultaneously in Nature Communications and led by researchers at McGill University, offer promise that a drug currently used to treat estrogen positive breast cancer may be effective in treating two different types of cancer, one rare and one common form.     The breakthrough discovery launching this research came in 2014 when Dr. William Foulkes, ...
Contributed By Benjamin Bartee  Feb 05, 2019
Thailand, Bangkok in particular, has emerged in recent decades as the worldwide leader in medical tourism, while simultaneously achieving interrelated healthcare milestones, with enormous tangential benefits to its own economy and population as well as to the world at large. Estimates by the U.S. National Library of Medicine indicate that, in 2013, the Kingdom attracted between 700,000 and 2.5 mil...
Thailand Medical News  Feb 05, 2019
Tris Pharma Inc. voluntarily recalled three lots of Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP 50 mg per 1.25 mL, to the retail level. The recalled lots of the product have been found to have potentially higher concentrations of ibuprofen than normal.   Images of packagings of recalled products “There is a remote possibility that infants, who may be more susceptible to...
Source: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio  Feb 04, 2019
In long-term survivors of childhood cancer, cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of early death from non-cancer causes. In a new study, published in JAMA Oncology, researchers compared four chemotherapy drugs with development of cardiomyopathy (abnormal heart muscle with impaired function) years after treatment.     "Exposure to anthracycline chemotherapies, such ...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Feb 04, 2019
Identical twin toddlers who presented with severe arthritis helped scientists to identify the first gene mutation that can single-handedly cause a juvenile form of this inflammatory joint disease. By investigating the DNA of individual blood cells of both children and then modelling the genetic defect in a mouse model, the research team led by Adrian Liston (VIB-KU Leuven) was able to unravel the ...
Source: Universitat Polytechnica de Valencia (UPV),Spain  Feb 03, 2019
Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis, are difficult to diagnose, specially in early stages. Specifically, in the case of lupus, specific antibodies aimed at antigens located in the nucleus of cells appear, including the anti-Ro/SSA. These anti-Ro/SSA antibodies can be found in the blood before other autoantibodies related with lupus, and can even be det...
Source: Simon Fraser University  Feb 03, 2019
The immune system is the body's best defense in fighting diseases like HIV and cancer. Now, an international team of researchers is harnessing the immune system to reveal new clues that may help in efforts to produce an HIV vaccine.     SFU professor Mark Brockman and co-authors from the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa have identified a connection between infection cont...
Source: Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin  Feb 03, 2019
Researchers at Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered a protective mechanism which is used by the body to protect intestinal stem cells from turning cancerous. The body's innate immune system was found to play a pivotal role in this regard. The researchers were able to demonstrate that, rather than having a purely defensive role, the immune system is crucial in maintaining a healthy b...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 03, 2019
Fenugreek is an herb in the same family as soy. People use its fresh and dried seeds, leaves, twigs, and roots as a spice, flavoring agent, and supplement. While more research is necessary, some studies show that fenugreek may have varied health benefits.     Fenugreek may be able to help reduce the risk of: -cancer  -diabetes  -obesity  -high cholesterol  -high blo...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 03, 2019
Kanika's blood pressure was "through the roof." She had gained a lot weight. A history of heart disease ran deep in her immediate family. When she looks back at herself in 2016, the year she suffered a stroke, she sees a "stubborn old buffalo" in denial about her health. "I had let my blood pressure go uncontrolled and I remained overweight for so long," sa...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 03, 2019
Medipines, a company based in California’s Orange County, obtained US FDA clearance for its MediPines Gas Exchange Monitor. The device is used to measure and monitor a variety of respiratory parameters and indices of patients presenting with lung conditions.       It can help to quickly triage patients and make decision making easier by providing parameters such as&nbs...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Feb 03, 2019
Hetero, one of India’s leading generic pharmaceutical companies and world’s largest producer of anti-retroviral drugs, announces the launch of generic version of lapatinib (250 mg) tablets in India. The product is marketed and distributed under the brand name ‘Hertab’ by Hetero Healthcare Ltd. It is made available in two SKUs, each consisting of 30 tablets and 150 tablets. ...
Source: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center  Feb 03, 2019
Dr. Paul Harch, Clinical Professor and Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, Chairman of Radiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, report the first PET scan-documented case of improvement in brain metabolism in Alzheimer's disease in a patient treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT).  The authors...
Source: Duke University Medical Center  Feb 02, 2019
A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. According to the 40-person study published in the journal PLOS ONE, emergency patients who underwent a treadmill stress test and showed signs of decreased blood flow to the heart also had changes in five met...
Source: University of San Diego  Feb 01, 2019
Search for a description of "p53" and it becomes clear that this human protein is widely known for its cancer-fighting benefits, leading to its renown as "the guardian of the genome." Scientists at the University of California San Diego have published a new study challenging that description. Studying the "wild type" version of p53 (WTp53), the form that exists b...
Source: Howard Hughes Medical Institute  Jan 31, 2019
Researchers can now quickly and accurately count a hidden, inactive form of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that lurks in patients' cells. This version of HIV embeds into cells' genomes and can persist despite otherwise successful therapies, thwarting attempts to cure the infection. Using a new genetic technique developed by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Robert Sil...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 30, 2019
An often-overlooked type of STD, oral gonorrhea presents a challenge for healthcare in Thailand and globally. The threat this bacterial infection poses is not limited to the disease itself – there are large-scale public health issues related both to long-term inflammation by an infection in the throat or mouth left untreated and to the wrongful prescription of certain antibiotics that give r...
Source: Purdue University  Jan 29, 2019
Researchers have been struggling for years to find a treatment for patients who have a recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive blood cancer that is one of the most lethal cancers. About 19,520 news cases are diagnosed a year, and about 10,670 people a year die from it, according to the American Cancer Society. Purdue University researchers are developing a series of drug compo...
Source: University of California, San Francisco  Jan 28, 2019
Regular use of a common type of medication, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, significantly improves survival for a third or more patients with head and neck cancer, a new study led by UC San Francisco has found. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, improved the overall five-year survival rate from 25 percent to 78 percent for patients whose cancer contained a specific...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 28, 2019
In recent years, various agencies within the Thai government have made concerted efforts to curb private medical institutions’ independence by installing burdensome regulations -- most recently by seeking to control what these businesses can charge for specific medicines, procedures, and supplies. Their basic rationale is that cost controls and other measures are necessary to ensure the best...
Source: University of California - San Diego  Jan 28, 2019
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has identified a genetic pathway that causes some individuals to develop an abnormal heart rhythm, or arrhythmia, after experiencing a heart attack. They have also identified a drug candidate that can block this pathway. "We now know one reason why a significant fraction of the public could develop secondary complications p...
Source: Brigham and Women's Hospital  Jan 27, 2019
BRCA1 and BRCA2 ("BReast CAncer genes") are critical tumor suppressor genes—women carrying a mutation in one of these genes have up to an 80 percent risk of developing breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of developing ovarian cancer. Cancer drugs known as Parp inhibitors have recently been approved for treating patients with BRCA-driven metastatic breast cancer or recurrent ovarian...
Source: The Wellcome Trusts  Jan 27, 2019
New diseases emerge all the time, and sexually transmitted infections are no exception. Here are four bacteria that could become serious public health threats. Already the infection rates are steadily increasing and worst in Asia, where a lot of people are not even aware of themselves contracting these infections or lack access to proper diagnostics or treatments and also complacency among doctors...
Source: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine  Jan 26, 2019
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. In a paper published  in the Journal of Immunology the team, led by LSTM's Professor Richard Pleass, show that by engineering a part of an antibody they can target ...
Source: University of Copenhagen  Jan 26, 2019
The crucial hormone insulin needs help acquiring the right structure. A protein that assists in the process of insulin folding has just been discovered in a new study conducted by researchers at the Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen. They hope the new research results can be used to develop treatments for conditions such as increased level of insulin in the blood known as...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 26, 2019
The Thai conglomerate, Charoen Pokphand Group is one of the world’s largest. It is also Thailand’s largest private company. With investments in over 30 countries and a huge presence in the Chinese market the group employs over 350,000 staff. It’s 3 core businesses operate in: Agribusiness & Food Retail & Distribution Telecommunications industries So, it was with sur...
Source: Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Dept, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona   Jan 25, 2019
A European team of researchers reports that modifying an adenovirus a certain way made it an effective tumor killer in mice with retinoblastoma. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the researchers describe modifying the virus and testing its effectiveness in treating retinoblastoma. Retinoblastoma, as its name implies, is a cancer of the retina. It is mos...
Source: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center  Jan 25, 2019
A team of researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College used genetic testing of cells found in cerebrospinal fluid to track certain brain tumors. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes tests they conducted with cancer patients and analysis of their cerebrospinal fluid, and what they found. Doctors who treat patients w...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 25, 2019
Continuing on our advice of the Global Medical ,Healthcare, Biotech and Pharma Stocks, we continue to advise all in executing caution and due diligence in buying Thai Healthcare, Medical, Pharma Stocks due to recent local Government intervention in the private healthcare sector and putting medical services and products under price control restrictions etc, coupled with the unpredictable political ...
Source: Cortexyme, Inc, US  Jan 24, 2019
Cortexyme, Inc., a privately held, clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing therapeutics to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other degenerative disorders, today announced publication of a foundational paper supporting its approach in Science Advances. In the paper, an international team of researchers led by Cortexyme co-founders Stephen Dominy, M.D. and Casey Lync...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 24, 2019
“Health support groups” have been shown to be effective tools for patients battling all varieties of health challenges -- from heart problems to mental health to alcohol addiction. Joining such a group of individuals with similar experiences/conditions who are also on the road to recovery is one aspect of a comprehensive strategy to speed recovery.  In this article, Thailand Medic...
Source: Yale University  Jan 24, 2019
Much of the research on HIV has focused on preventing infection but little is understood about how the body keeps the virus in check post-infection. A new study by Yale investigators reveals the role of a protein that serves to block HIV gene expression once it has entered human cells. The research team, led by Manabu Taura, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of immunobiologist  ...
Source: Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University  Jan 23, 2019
Lingering inflammation in the colon is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer and now scientists report one way it resets the stage to enable this common and often deadly cancer. Inflammation is supposed to be a short-term response to an infection or other irritant in the body that is essential to eliminating it. But when inflammation persists, it can contribute to a myriad of common condit...
Source: NYU Langone Health, New York  Jan 23, 2019
Most studies evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for facial rejuvenation and other cosmetic procedures have reported positive results, according to a critical review in the publication: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). PRP Injections are reportedly the latests trends of 2019 for Aesthetic Clinics a...
Source: University of Pennsylvania  Jan 22, 2019
Immune cells called macrophages are supposed to serve and protect, but cancer has found ways to put them to sleep. Now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they've identified how to fuel macrophages with the energy needed to attack and eat cancer cells. It is well established that macrophages can either support cancer cell growth and spread or hinder ...
Source: Washington University School of Medicine  Jan 22, 2019
A simple blood test reliably detects signs of brain damage in people on the path to developing Alzheimer’s disease – even before they show signs of confusion and memory loss, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Germany. The findings, published in Nature Medicine, may one day be ap...
Source: Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute  Jan 22, 2019
In the largest genetic study of osteoarthritis to date, scientists have uncovered 52 new genetic changes linked to the disease, which doubles the number of genetic regions associated with the disabling condition. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, GSK and their collaborators analysed the genomes of over 77,000 people with osteoarthritis. Their findings, published  in Nature ...
Source: Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Australia  Jan 22, 2019
B-group vitamins may be beneficial for maintaining concentration skills among people experiencing a first episode of psychosis, a study by researchers from Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, has found. The study, led by Dr Colin O'Donnell, now at Letterkenny University Hospital, and Dr Kelly Allott from Orygen, explored the impact of increasing a person's ...
Source: University Of Melbourne  Jan 22, 2019
Researchers studying lupus discovered that treatments similar to those already in use to treat melanoma and lung cancer, including immunotherapy, show promise for stomach cancer and may even lead to preventative treatments. Usually the symptoms of stomach or gastric cancer are hard to pick up until it’s too late, making what is a relatively common cancer an often fatal one. Survival rate...
Source: Flinders University  Jan 21, 2019
A new antibiotic developed by a Flinders University researcher is being heralded as a breakthrough in the war against a drug resistant superbug. Bacteria are winning the fight against antibiotics as they evolve to fight off traditional treatments, threatening decades of advancements in modern medicine, with predictions they will kill over 10 million people by 2050. The scientific development o...
Source: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW  Jan 20, 2019
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated for the first time. The discovery, pu...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 20, 2019
Positive news for Thailand’s healthcare sector was highly welcome when Bloomberg released their Global Health Care Efficiency Index in the last quarter of 2018. Thailand Medical News reviews these extremely positive results and suggest  why momentum must be maintained as well as 2 challenges that must be addressed in order for this momentum to be carried forward on a continuous basis....
Source: University of Michigan  Jan 20, 2019
A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends. Researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center reported in 2016 that acupressure helped reduce fatigue in breast cancer survivors. In the new study, they looked at the impact of acupressure on symptoms that frequently accompan...
Source: Hong Kong Baptist University  Jan 19, 2019
Epstein-Barr virus infects more than 95 percent of people, usually without symptoms. But sometimes its persistence in cells can lead to tumor formation. Now, researchers from Hong Kong and the UK have developed a fluorescing, molecular-sized probe, called L2P4, which can inhibit Epstein-Barr-related tumor growth while allowing researchers to see the targeted tumor cells. Epstein-Barr v...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 19, 2019
The US FDA  and EU has approved a new sublingual formulation of sufentanil, Dsuvia, for the management of acute pain in adults in medically supervised healthcare settings, such as hospitals, surgical centers, and emergency departments. The drug is supplied in a 30 microgram tablet in a single-dose, prefilled applicator for administration by a healthcare professional, and it will not be availa...
Source: Washington University School of Medicine , St. Louis   Jan 18, 2019
Scientists working to develop more effective treatments for diabetes are turning to stem cells. Such cells can be transformed into cells that produce insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more ...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 18, 2019
Various research reports on Thailand’s role in the production, local dissemination and exportation to domestic as well as international markets for medical devices reveal healthy forecasts. Predications are that the medical device market in the country  will continue to grow at average rates of between 8.5-10% per annum. Such strength in growth opens exciting opportunities for the Me...
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences  Jan 18, 2019
UCLA researchers have developed the first technique for turning certain stem cells into mature T cells capable of fighting cancer. The university announced on  January  17th  2019,  that its scientists had developed a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells – which can create cell in the body and be grown in a lab – into T cells that can attack tumors. Immun...
Source: US FDA  Jan 18, 2019
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a safety alert regarding the possibility of an increased risk of death associated with the use of paclitaxel-coated balloons and paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The FDA's communication follows a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Heart Association ...
Source: NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine  Jan 17, 2019
A new class of engineered proteins may counter infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus -- a bacterial species considered one of the largest global health threats, a new study suggests. Published online Jan. 16 in Science Translational Medicine, the study is the result of a five-year research partnership between scientists at NYU School of Medicine and Janssen Research & Dev...
Thailand Medical News  Jan 16, 2019
The bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) is sexually transmitted and can cause inflammation of the urinary and genital tracts in men and women. This germ may also be linked to other problems, including some cases of arthritis and, in women, pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. MG appears to be spread by unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, as it can be detected in fluid s...
Source: Hong Kong University  Jan 16, 2019
The world has been repeatedly plagued by infectious disease outbreaks, including SARS and MERS coronaviruses, avian influenza viruses, and Zika virus. A team at the Medical Faculty of The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) led by Professor Yuen Kwok-yung and Dr Shuofeng Yuan of the Department of Microbiology, has discovered a novel broad-spectrum antiviral drug that would be strategic for epidemic c...
Source: Hyogo College of Medicine, Japan  Jan 15, 2019
In a recent study conducted by Professor Dr. Tadayuki Oshima and Professor Dr. Eitatsu Arai from Hyogo College of Medicine, in Japan , demonstrated that the potassium-competitive acid blocker (P-CAB) vonoprazan demonstrates superior efficacy in the treatment of patients with erosive oesophagitis compared with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole, with the results of a small ...
Source: Krembil Research Institute  Jan 15, 2019
Scientists at the Krembil Research Institute have developed a novel therapeutic treatment that has the potential to stop knee and spine osteoarthritis in its tracks. A team led by Principal Investigator Dr. Mohit Kapoor, Arthritis Research Director at UHN, published the results today in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases in a paper titled "microRNA-181a-5p antisense oligonucleotide...
Source: Ontario Institute for Cancer Research  Jan 15, 2019
Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered mutational signatures of tumor hypoxia (low oxygen) in 19 cancer types. The results could be used to help clinicians identify patients who would benefit from higher treatment doses.   In a landmark pan-cancer study analyzing more than 8,000 tumors across 19 different cancer types, researchers have identified molecular hallmarks of...
Source: PLOS  Jan 15, 2019
A practical resource-based public health approach for the rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals living in low- and middle-income countries could save thousands of lives, according to an Essay published January 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Mark Tenforde of the University of Washington School of Medicine, and colleagues. Effective antir...
Source: North American Menopause Society (NAMS).  Jan 14, 2019
There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results. A new large-scale study from Korea shows that women receiving HT had a significantly lower prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with women who did not take hormones. Study results are published online in Menopause, the ...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 14, 2019
There are many convincing reasons why expats living in Thailand must take advantage of the country’s healthcare systems. As well as looking at the real benefits to be seen if an individual ever needs to avail of the country’s world-class hospitals, we, at Thailand Medical News will also touch on the more practical matters at local healthcare level. There is a local clinic near you! ...
Source: Newcastle University  Jan 14, 2019
There is little benefit for those over 70 taking higher dose vitamin D supplements to improve their bone strength and reduce the risk of falls, new research has revealed. Older people are often encouraged to take supplements of vitamin D to keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy. But a Newcastle University-led study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, has backed previous...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Jan 13, 2019
Spondyloarthritis is one of the most common types of chronic joint inflammation affecting nearly 1-2% of the Western population. Cytokine blockade of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and more recently Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has revolutionized the perspectives of patients suffering from this disease by achieving high levels of therapeutic efficacy. The disease differs substantially from rheumatoid arthr...
Source: Massachusetts General Hospital  Jan 13, 2019
A study from a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified the specific function of a protein found in HIV and related viruses that appears to slow down viral spread in the earliest stages of infection. But they also found that, after initially slowing down the spread of infection, that function may help the virus survive later on by evading the immune response. Their report ...
Source: US FDA  Jan 13, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ultomiris (ravulizumab) injection for the treatment of adult patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a rare and life-threatening blood disease. “The approval of Ultomiris will change the way that patients with PNH are treated,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and...
Source: Bruin Biometrics  Jan 13, 2019
Pressure ulcers are a common malady for bedridden patients, a situation that clinicians have been struggling to improve significantly. There are devices that  sense how long a part of a body has been pressed on for too long, beds that deflate and inflate different areas to provide temporary respite, and clinical routines that help to prevent pressure ulcers. Bruin Biometrics, a compa...
Source: Loyola University Health System  Jan 12, 2019
A landmark study co-authored by a Loyola Medicine oncologist has found that a newer targeted drug is significantly more effective than standard therapy for treating elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The drug, ibrutinib, attacks cancer cells without damaging normal cells, thus causing fewer side effects. The drug is taken as a pill once a day -- much more convenient than ...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Jan 12, 2019
Alzheimer's-affected brains are riddled with so-called amyloid plaques: protein aggregates consisting mainly of amyloid-β. However, this amyloid-β is a fragment produced from a precursor protein whose normal function has remained enigmatic for decades. A team of scientists at VIB and KU Leuven led by professors Joris de Wit and Bart De Strooper has now uncovered that this amyloid pre...
Source: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center  Jan 12, 2019
Researchers have identified a new potential immunotherapy target in pancreatic cancer, which so far has been notoriously resistant to treatment with immune checkpoint blockade drugs effective against a variety of other cancers. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center research team found overexpression of the immune checkpoint VISTA on immune cells, especially macrophages, that infiltr...
Source: University Of Basel  Jan 11, 2019
The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. In the journal Cell, the team of molecular biologists, computational biologists, and clinicians reports on their interdisciplinary approach. The ima...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Jan 10, 2019
New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. Researchers proposed two explanations for the association of heightened immune responses in patients with schizophrenia and EBV in...
Source: National Multiple Sclerosis Society  Jan 10, 2019
An immune system drug may help prevent or slow complications in a type of multiple sclerosis known as secondary progressive MS, a new study finds. The medication is called rituximab (Rituxan). It's used to treat a number of conditions, including certain blood cell cancers and the autoimmune condition rheumatoid arthritis. The new Swiss study found that MS patients taking the drug reported ...
Source: University of Louisville  Jan 10, 2019
Scientists at the University of Louisville have shown that a microbial metabolite, Urolithin A, derived from a compound found in berries and pomegranates, can reduce and protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Millions of people worldwide suffer from IBD in the form of either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, and few effective long-term treatments are available. Illustration s...
Source: Arizona State University  Jan 09, 2019
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD).   Lead authors Ramon Velazquez and Salvatore Oddo, along with their colleagues in the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), investigate the effects of choline, an important nutrient that ma...
Source: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  Jan 08, 2019
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a protein involved in cell proliferation and the development of new blood vessels that could serve as a marker for the early detection of colorectal cancers. In laboratory studies, investigators found that expression of the protein, called beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase-V (beta-1,4-GalT-V), was increased in human colorectal cancer tumor cells compared ...
Source: University Health Network  Jan 08, 2019
A clinical-scientific team specializing in head-and-neck cancer has identified a way to manipulate metabolism to potentially curb skin fibrosis -- a common side effect of radiotherapy affecting quality of life of cancer survivors. The study findings from the laboratory of principal investigator Dr. Fei-Fei Liu, Chief, Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Networ...
Source: Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.  Jan 08, 2019
Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with an oral nerve pain medication used to treat pain caused by a previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to a Rutgers study.   The study, which was the first to analyze sexual function in women with vulva pain treated with Gabapentin, appeared in the American Journal of Obstetri...
Source: DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)  Jan 07, 2019
A research team led by Professor Sung Bae Lee of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Professor Daehee Hwang of New Biology (Vice-head of the Plant Age and Life Research Group, IBS) has identified the early neuropathology mechanism of structural characteristics of polyglutamine toxic protein on neurodegenerative brain disorders. It was through a joint research with Professor Yuh Nung Jan at the Howard...
Staff Writer, Thailand Medical News  Jan 07, 2019
Despite having some of the best vantage points in term of being a being an excellent tourism destination coupled with some of the best medical facilities and hospitals in the world, Thailand is gradually losing its edge as a Medical Tourism destination in the region due to a variety of factors. Among the top three factors amidst an assortment of reasons are:  a) Lack of Proper Medical Mark...
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Jan 06, 2019
Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells. In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol...
Source: Baylor College of Medicine  Jan 06, 2019
Fungal infections are emerging as a major medical challenge, and a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a mouse model to study the short-term consequences of fungal infection in the brain. The researchers report in the journal Nature Communications the unexpected finding that the common yeast Candida albicans, a type of fungus, can cross the blood-b...
Source: University Of Bergen  Jan 05, 2019
Diabetes is caused by damaged or non-existing insulin cells inability to produce insulin, a hormone that is necessary in regulating blood sugar levels. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels. In collaboration with other international researchers, researchers at the University of Bergen have, discovered that glucagon.producing cells in the pancreas, can change i...
Source: Princeton University  Jan 04, 2019
By simultaneously tackling two mechanisms for cancer's growth, an experimental therapy reduced the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in a study conducted in mice. The therapeutic agent, called Tinagl1, is based on a naturally occurring protein and blocks two of the main pathways by which breast cancer cells can grow and migrate out of the primary tumor to spread to other organs in the b...
Source: Oregon State University  Jan 03, 2019
A research study at Oregon State University has shown that a higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems. Metabolic syndrome affects more than 30 percent of the global adult population and this findings might provide some relief to a majority of them. "What these finding...
Source: University Of California -Berkeley  Jan 02, 2019
A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's. In a proposed device, two of the new chips would be embedded in a chassis located outside the head. Each chip could monitor ele...
Source: University Of Zurich  Jan 01, 2019
Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease of the lung, for which there is currently no cure. The underlying cause of the disease is a malfunction of the chloride channel CFTR, which prevents the secretion of chloride in certain body cells. This leads to dehydration of the mucus layer in the lung. A promising approach for treating cystic fibrosis is the activation of the calcium-activated chlo...
Source: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.  Jan 01, 2019
Scientists have created a cheaper, faster, reproducible diagnostic technique that has the potential to predict the risk of metastasis in prostate cancer.   For patients who are newly diagnosed, or patients previously treated, the risk of metastasis in prostrate cancer  is a crucial factor of whether to choose conservative management or undergo further treatment. For prostate as we...
Source: University of California San Diego  Jan 01, 2019
Dermal fibroblasts are specialized cells deep in the skin that generate connective tissue and help the skin recover from injury. Some fibroblasts have the ability to convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving the skin a plump, youthful look and producing a peptide that plays a critical role in fighting infections. Studies by the University of California San Diego School of Medic...
Source: Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019
A company is in Houston, Texas is introducing new acoustic shockwave technology for quicker laser tattoo removal. What’s more, the new device also shows potential in aesthetics market for cellulite and fat removal. The patented Rapid Acoustic Pulse (RAP) device by Soliton Inc, uses acoustic shockwaves that accelerated the speed of tattoo removal when used with lasers, delivering results i...
Source: Medical University of Vienna  Jan 01, 2019
A type of glycoproteins ie carbohydrate binding proteins, called galectins, plays an important role in the degeneration of cartilage in osteoarthritis. A research group at the Medical University of Vienna was able to demonstrate this correlation, in cooperation with international study partners. In osteoarthritis, certain galectins are produced by the cartilage cells themselves and accelerate the ...
Source: Staff Writer, Thailand Medical News  Jan 01, 2019
Firibastat By Quantum Genomics is an oral antihypertensive drug that has proved  to be safe and effective and well-tolerated  in  the NEW-HOPE, a phase 2b clinical trial focused on an understudied and underserved patient population composed largely of overweight or obese, high-risk, hypertensive racial minorities. Firibastat is the first brain aminopeptidase A inhibitor. It selec...
Source: University of Michigan  Jan 01, 2019
A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries. "We've known for a long time that esophageal adenocarcinoma primarily affects Caucasians and ver...
Source: Pasteur Institute  Jan 01, 2019
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus – it is their metabolic (or energy-producing) activity1 that enables the virus to multiply. Thanks to met...
Source: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center   Jan 01, 2019
An investigational oral antibiotic called zoliflodacin was well-tolerated and successfully cured most cases of uncomplicated gonorrhea when tested in a Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial, according to findings published  in the New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, sponsored the ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University   Jan 01, 2019
A new test for chlamydia can provide results within 30 minutes, potentially speeding up the start of treatment, researchers say.   The rapid test for the sexually transmitted disease means patients can receive treatment immediately, instead of having to wait for a follow-up appointment. This could help reduce the spread of the disease, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins Universit...
Source: Texas A&M University  Jan 01, 2019
A recent study led by researchers in Texas A&M University's department of nutrition and food science shows how a novel regulatory mechanism serves as an important biomarker for the development of diabetes, as well as a potential therapeutic target for its prevention. The study can be found online in the November edition of the diabetes journal of the American Diabetes Associati...
Source: University of Groningen  Jan 01, 2019
A team of researchers with members from the Netherlands and the U.S. has found differences in the numbers of gut microbes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine the group describes how they sequenced the genome of gut microbes in patients with bowel problems and what they found. ...
Source: University Of South Australia  Jan 01, 2019
One of the biggest health issues could be checked if more people took up yoga or tai chi and reduced their blood pressure, an Australian study has found. Stroke costs the world $120 billion a year through treatment and loss of productivity, affecting 2.6 million people in  2017. A paper published in Future Neurology by researchers from Monash University, the University of South ...
Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center  Jan 01, 2019
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels. According to a recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, magnesium may help in maintaining optimum vitamin D levels in the body. The randomised study that had 250...
Source: Teva Pharmaceuticals  Jan 01, 2019
The FDA has approved the first inhaler with built-in monitoring sensors to track medication adherence for asthma and COPD patients, according to Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. The ProAir Digihaler (albuterol sulfate 117 mcg) inhalation powder is equipped with built-in sensors that connect via Bluetooth to a companion mobile application, which stores data. Teva's &nbs...
Source: Cleveland Clinic  Dec 31, 2018
Cleveland Clinic researchers have shown, for the first time in humans, that choline is directly linked to increased production of a gut bacteria byproduct that increases the risk of blood-clotting events like heart attack and stroke. However, the research also showed that adding a low dose of aspirin may reduce that risk. In a small interventional study, the researchers provided oral choline, s...
Source: Osaka University  Dec 30, 2018
A team of researchers led by Osaka University examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli (CR-E) in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent. This Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a non-pathogenic bacterium, so the residents have no symptom...
Source: Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine  Dec 29, 2018
The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance—which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure—from natural dietary fiber. "You are what you eat," as the proverb goes. But to a large extent our well-being also dep...
Source: University of Southern California  Dec 28, 2018
A new study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers shows there's yet another reason to avoid a high fat, high cholesterol diet: It can trigger changes in the immune system that lead to a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States, and an estimated 2...
Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 27, 2018
A new study has found that genes cause about 1 in 10 cases of chronic kidney disease in adults, and that identifying the responsible genes has a direct impact on treatment for most of these patients.  “Our study shows that genetic testing can be used to personalize the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, and that nephrologists should consider incorporating it into the diagnost...
Source: University Of Toronto  Dec 26, 2018
Letrozole was found to damage normal function in the hippocampus of monkeys The animals also showed anxiety and hot flashes after four weeks of treatment Side effects like fatigue are experienced by up to 30% of women on the drug   A drug commonly given out  to breast-cancer patients may affect their brain function and memory, research suggests.Letrozole is primarily used to treat b...
Source: Dallas Morning News (Anna Kuchment)  Dec 25, 2018
Medical researchers fear that more children will develop paralysis from a mysterious polio like illness that has struck every two years since 2014. The condition, known as acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, is rare and has reached its peak for 2018. It will likely continue to fade as winter approaches. But many believe it will be back.   D68 Enterovirus "AFM is here, and it doesn't se...
Source: University of Bristol  Dec 24, 2018
Scientists have identified a growth factor found in the kidneys that could minimise the diabetes-inducing effects of blood vessel damage. The research, led by experts in renal disease and translational health sciences from the University of Bristol  focused on a group of growth factors categorised as VEGFs, or vascular endothelial growth factors. These are growth factors produced by...
Source: University Of Virginia School Of Medicine  Dec 23, 2018
A group of genes called SLCs that has been largely ignored by scientists could play critical roles in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), inflammation, and likely obesity and other metabolic diseases, new research suggests.The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in the context of how our bodies recognize and remove dying cells. SLC Gene &nb...
Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital  Dec 22, 2018
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a subset of helper T cells that may help to redefine understanding and treatment of chronic, debilitating inflammatory disorders. The study focused on a family of helper T cells called Th17 cells. Th17 cells help to launch the immune response against fungal infection and other threats. These cells can also fuel the destructive i...
Source: Yale University  Dec 21, 2018
In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell. Researchers around the world have been racing to create therapies that unleash th...
Source: Columbia University Irving Medical Center  Dec 20, 2018
In a phase three clinical trial, a drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for two years in 80 percent of patients who completed treatment, a significant increase in progression-free survival compared with placebo. (Progression-free survival is the length of time a patient lives without worsening of the disease). There is no standard of care for patients with desmo...
Source: University Of Virginia  Dec 19, 2018
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have made a discovery about human papillomavirus (HPV) that could lead to new treatments for cervical cancer and other cancers caused by the virus. HPV is responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer and 95 percent of anal cancers. It is the most common sexually transmitted disease, infecting more than 600 million people glo...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center  Dec 18, 2018
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice. Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke. Blood pressur...
Source: University Of Tasmania  Dec 17, 2018
Diabetes has been tied to a number of complications such as kidney disease, but new research has found that older people with type 2 diabetes can also have more difficulties with thinking and memory.   During a five-year study, participants with diabetes showed a decline in verbal memory and fluency. Using MRI scans, researchers saw that the participants' brains were smaller at the star...
Source: Newcastle University  Dec 16, 2018
Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates. In the largest study of its kind, researchers at Newcastle University, UK, have led national research into the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed myeloma.   The results, published online today by The Lancet Oncolo...
Source: Rutgers University  Dec 15, 2018
Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. A team of Rutgers scientists, including Leonard Lee and Shaohua Li, have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce ...
Source: Harvard Medical School  Dec 14, 2018
The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led by investigators at Harvard Medical School suggests that weakened metabolism of immune T cells may be p...
Source: University of Basel  Dec 13, 2018
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. The widely used...
Source: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc   Dec 13, 2018
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. Further, in HIV-infected men with virologic suppression testosterone was significantly associated with a higher BMD score at the lumbar spine, as reported in AID...
Source: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil  Dec 12, 2018
Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed that a natural flavonoid is effective at treating Leishmania amazonensis infections. Leishmaniasis is endemic to 98 countries and affect...
Source: TMN  Dec 10, 2018
 CAP or Community-acquired pneumonia disproportionately affects older people, with high rates of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Although pneumococcal vaccines are routinely recommended for this population, fewer than 40% of adults age 60 and older get vaccinated. Thus, antibiotics are key to treating CAP in the elderly—and the earlier that antibiotic therapy starts, the bett...
Source: University of Birmingham  Dec 09, 2018
The  large scale systematic review published in The Cochrane Library as part of a Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews bringing together a vast  body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer. The suite of eleven reviews was led by Dr Jac Dinnes at the University of Birmingham and supported by the Cochrane Skin Group and a team of over 30 researc...
Source: Northwestern University  Dec 08, 2018
An extensive study from Northwestern Medicine psanning over two decades,  reports that Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA  (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk o...
Source: University of Montreal  Dec 07, 2018
A team of researchers at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at Université de Montréal has demonstrated that a cancer vaccine can work. Not only that, it could become an extremely effective, non-invasive and cost-effective cancer -fighting tool.   The team's work was published yesterday in Science Translational Medicine.The discovery repres...
Source: University of Tennessee Health Science Center, US.  Dec 06, 2018
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice.Their study ends much uncertainty about the contribution this molecule makes to high blood pressure and could lead to the development of new drugs. High blood pressure affects millions worldwide and is a leading cause of heart attack and stroke.   Blo...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine  Dec 05, 2018
The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.   Little or no mycoplasma DnaK DNA sequences were found associated with the tumor, which was ful...
Source: Tuff University  Dec 04, 2018
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features ...
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center  Dec 03, 2018
An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy—to be published on-line Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine (and presented at the ASH annual meeting in San Diego)—found that 52 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy; 40 percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response. One year later, 65 percent percent of those patients w...
Source: University Of Alabama at Birmingham  Dec 02, 2018
Preclinical experiments by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. HPV infections caused an estimated 266,000 deaths from cervical cancer worldwide in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Routine screening by Pap smears or HPV D...
Source: University Of Montreal  Dec 01, 2018
Of the 50 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Canadian scientists think they've found an important clue. TRIM5 Alpha protein Working in collaboration with a team...
Source: University Of Zurich  Nov 30, 2018
Stem cell transplantation is effective against leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue—often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process. Blocking this molecule could significantly improve the outcome of patients receivin...
Source: Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute for Medical Research  Nov 29, 2018
Scientists have uncovered that an emerging gene therapy for Parkinson's disease creates new circuits in the brain associated with improved motor movement. These findings, published today in Science Translational Medicine by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Professor David Eidelberg, MD, and his team, explain the therapeutic mechanisms involved in the emerging Parkinson's ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University Of Medicine  Nov 28, 2018
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells, but show no viral load in blood tests. While based on small numbers, the data suggest that long-term viral remission migh...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center   Nov 27, 2018
A new study has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. If confirmed in humans, they could lead to more effective ways to control certain aggressive types of prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death for men in the world. Men whose  prostrate cancer tumor...
Source: University of Minnesota  Nov 26, 2018
A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body. After targeting the "motors" that generate forces in cancer cells to move, the cancer ce...
Source: VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)  Nov 25, 2018
Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research identified the mechanisms by which the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile kills intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), thus destroying the protective mucosal barrier of the intestinal tract. The researchers demonstrate the physiological relevance of this process during infection and have published their findings in Nature Commu...
Source: American Academy of Neurology  Nov 24, 2018
Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the November 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to researc...
Source: University Of Manchester  Nov 23, 2018
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease. The discovery is a major advance in understanding of the significantly under-diagnosed disorder which, if left undetected, can lead to failing kidneys that need dialysis or kidney transplantation.    The discovery of 35 kidney &n...
Society for Endocrinology  Nov 22, 2018
Cognitive difficulties in patients with diabetes, caused by repeated episodes of low blood sugar, could be reduced with antioxidants, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces cognitive impairments caused by low blood sugar, which could help to improve the qualit...
Source: Cancer Research UK  Nov 22, 2018
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer.    The results of the study, which was funded by Cancer Research UK and Worldwide Cancer Research, are published in Nature.   Tumours ...
Source: Ministry Of Foreign Affairs (Thailand)  Nov 22, 2018
 On 21 November 2018, the Prince Mahidol Award Foundation under the Royal Patronage (PMAF) held a joint press conference at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, to announce the 27th Prince Mahidol Laureates for 2018 in the field of Medicine and Public Health. Ms. Busadee Santipitaks, Director-General of the Department of Information, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, in the capacity of the ...
University Of Queensland  Nov 21, 2018
A world-first clinical trial of a new cellular immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved symptoms and quality of life for the majority of patients. This electron microscopic image of two Epstein Barr Virus virions (viral particles) shows round capsids—protein-encased genetic material—loosely surrounded by the membrane envelope. Credit: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0030430.g...
Source: University Of Leeds   Nov 20, 2018
Both aspirin and a purified omega-3, called EPA, reduce the number of pre-cancerous polyps in patients found to be at high risk of developing bowel cancer, according to new research. A clinical trial, led by the University of Leeds, found that both aspirin and EPA reduced the number of bowel polyps in patients one year on from a screening colonoscopy (large bowel camera test), although they did ...
Source: British Medical Journal  Nov 19, 2018
Based on results of an observational  study published earlier this week in The BMJ, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, compared with a similar, but distinct type of blood pressure medication known as angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Researchers evaluated patients from a U.K. primary care database and identified ove...
Source: VIB (The Flanders Institute For Biotechnology)   Nov 19, 2018
Mutations in RAS proteins initiate many of the most aggressive tumors, and the search for pharmacological inhibitors of these proteins has become a priority in the battle against cancer. Michail Steklov, Francesca Baietti, and colleagues from the Anna Sablina lab (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology) identified LZTR1 as an evolutionarily conserved component of the RAS pathway. Multiple ...
Source: University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy (Kingston)  Nov 18, 2018
Antiepileptic drugs were found to be linked with almost ninefold increased odds for two adverse skin reactions, Steven‐Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, compared with non-AED medication classes in an analysis of adverse-event data from the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy in Kingston, ...
Source: US FDA  Nov 17, 2018
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved  cemiplimab (Libtayo) for use in patients with locally advanced or metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). This agent is the first to be approved for advanced cSCC and is intended for those who are not eligible for curative surgery or radiation. Researchers reported on the efficacy of cemiplimab in expansion cohorts of a phase I...
Source: Karolinska Institutet  Nov 16, 2018
A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation. The study is published in Science and was done in collaboration with the University of Texas Medical Branch, Uppsala...
Source: University Health Network  Nov 15, 2018
Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined "liquid biopsy", epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings, published online today in Nature, describe not only a way to detect cancer,  but hold promise of bei...
Source: TMN Staff Writer  Nov 15, 2018
Yet another blood pressure drug has been recalled because of fears of impurities added by a lab in China. Drug company Sandoz says it has recalled one lot of losartan  potassium hydrochlorothiazide tablets. The impurity, known as NDEA, was found in the drug’s key ingredient made by Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceutical Co. in China. NDEA is found naturally in certain foods, drinking wa...
Source: Translational Research Center For Medical Innovation, Kobe, Japan  Nov 15, 2018
Blocking amyloid assemble in blood vessels is a promising strategy for slowing dementia. Milk Thistle A component of milk thistle may prevent the deterioration in brain function associated with Alzheimer’s disease by blocking the aggregation of the amyloid-β protein in the brain’s blood vessels.   Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-&b...
Source: American Heart Association  Nov 14, 2018
Low-dose rivaroxaban (Xarelto) added to antiplatelet therapy was associated with reduced risk of thromboembolic events in heart failure patients, researchers reported here.   In post hoc analysis of the COMMANDER HF trial, rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) led to a lower composite of thromboembolic events (13.1% vs 15.5%, HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.96) compared with placebo, reported Barry Green...
Source: Georgetown University Medical Center   Nov 14, 2018
A defining feature of Parkinson's disease is the clumps of alpha-synuclein protein that accumulate in the brain's motor control area, destroying dopamine-producing neurons. Natural processes can't clear these clusters, known as Lewy bodies, and no one has demonstrated how to stop the build up as well as breakdown of the clumps—until perhaps now.   A team of neurologists at...
Source: University Of Minnesota  Nov 13, 2018
Researchers from the University of Minnesota, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the University of Toronto have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis—more commonly known as mono or the "kissing disease"—that infects millions of people around the globe each...
SOURCE: BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  Nov 13, 2018
Uncovering a novel mechanism that promotes growth of breast cancer bone metastasis has revealed a potential Achilles' heel for these cancer cells. Reported in the journal Cancer Cell, the study shows that interfering with this mechanism can reduce the risk of relapses in animal models. "Metastasis is the dissemination of cancer cells from the original tumor location to other organ...
Source: Yale University  Nov 12, 2018
A drug therapy used for patients with chronic heart failure also improves markers of poor prognosis in individuals who are hospitalized with acute heart failure, new Yale-led research shows. The findings suggest that the drug can improve outcomes for acutely ill heart patients and potentially become the new standard of care for treating this serious condition, the researchers said. The study wa...
Source: University of Tampere  Nov 12, 2018
Brown spots on skin caused by sun exposure can be removed using medicated creams, a process that may help prevent future cancers. Actinic keratoses – also known as sun spots – are brown or pink scaly marks caused by UV rays. In the past, it’s been possible to have sun spots removed by freezing them off with liquid nitrogen, but the pain associated with this ...
Source: NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences(USA)  Nov 11, 2018
The National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded there is clear evidence that male rats exposed to high levels of radio frequency radiation (RFR) like that used in 2G , 3G and 4G cell phones developed cancerous heart tumors, according to final reports released today. There was also some evidence of tumors in the brain and adrenal gland of exposed male rats. For female rats, and male and female mice...
Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  Nov 10, 2018
The management of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV), an autoimmune disorder that cripples the immune system by attacking healthy cells, remains a major global health challenge in developing countries that lack infrastructure and trained medical professionals. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone...
Source: University Of Iowa  Nov 09, 2018
An unexpected finding that links a structural heart protein to gene regulation following heart stress suggests potential new avenues for developing heart failure therapies.   The work led by University of Iowa heart researcher Long-Sheng Song, MD, focuses on a protein called junctophilin-2 (JP2). Previous work from Song's lab has shown that JP2 is a structural protein that is essen...
Source: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center  Nov 06, 2018
Study points to possible way to predict increased inflammation risk   With an estimated 40 million people in the world dealing with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), physicians can have a hard time telling which newly diagnosed patients have a high risk of severe inflammation or what therapies will be most effective. Now researchers report in the journal JCI Insights finding an ep...
Source: University of Sheffield  Nov 04, 2018
Vitamin D supplements could help to ease painful Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) symptoms, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found. Scientists from the University's Department of Oncology and Metabolism reviewed and integrated all available research on vitamin D and IBS -- a condition which affects two in 10 people in the UK. The study showed a high prevalence of vitamin D def...
Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center  Nov 02, 2018
A team led by a Cedars-Sinai physician-scientist has discovered a biomarker -- a protein found in the blood -- for the most common type of heart failure, a new study published today in JAMA Cardiologyshows. Discovery may aid doctors in diagnosing at-risk patients before symptoms appear. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) affects more than 6.5 million Americans each year...
Source: University of Otago  Nov 01, 2018
University of Otago researchers have used high-resolution electron microscopy images to reveal how an anti-cancer virus interacts with tumor cells, increasing its potential to save lives. Seneca Valley Virus (SVV), a newly discovered virus which infects cancer cells but not normal tissue, has become a main research project in the New Zealand laboratory of Dr Mihnea Bostina, Academic Director of ...
Source: National News Bureau Of Thailand  Oct 29, 2018
The Ministry of Public Health has instructed all hospitals under it to prescribe medications appropriately, and lower antibiotics use by 20%, by 2021.    In 2019, the ministry will decrease antibiotic prescriptions for upper respiratory tract infections, acute diarrhea, open wounds and normal labor, to decrease drug resistant risks. The ministry instructed the hospitals to prescribe me...
Source: Lund University in Sweden  Oct 26, 2018
By blocking a protein, VDAC1, in the insulin-producing beta cells, it is possible to restore their normal function in case of type 2 diabetes. In preclinical experiments, the researchers behind a new study have also shown that it is possible to prevent the development of the disease. The findings are published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism. VDAC1 Protein The researchers at Lund...
Source: University Of North Carolina  Oct 26, 2018
Internists now know that patients who have a sibling with diverticulitis can have three times the risk for the disease, and a low-risk lifestyle decreases risk of incident diverticulitis by half. Nuts, seeds, and popcorn are now OK. Annually in the U.S., diverticulitis is responsible for 2.5 million office visits, 333,000 ED visits, 216,000 hospital admissions, and health care costs of $3.5 bill...
Source: University of East Anglia  Oct 26, 2018
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death. Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. The main types of omega 3 fatty acids are; alphalinolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaeno...
Source: Roche  Oct 25, 2018
Roche announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Xofluza™ (baloxavir marboxil) for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated influenza, or flu, in people 12 years of age and older. Xofluza is a first-in-class, single-dose oral medicine with a novel proposed mechanism of action that inhibits polymerase acidic endonuclease, an enzyme essential for viral replication. [1-2...
Source: siemens.com  Jul 10, 2018
Siemens Healthineers is releasing a fresh update to its popular ACUSON Sequoia ultrasound system. The device can image deeper than before while maintaining a high quality output, an important capability for those on the front lines of the obesity epidemic. As an example, using the Deep Abdominal Transducer (DAX) that comes with the Sequoia, clinicians can image targets pretty well as dee...
Source: doi.org  Jul 10, 2018
Using high energy ultrasound beams to destroy prostate cancer tumours may be as effective as surgery or radiotherapy, but with fewer side effects. Ultrasound therapy destroys cancer cells in the prostate (illustrated) Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with around 47,000 cases every year. Treatments include surgery to remove the gland, or radiotherapy, which uses radia...
Source: cookmedical.com  Jul 08, 2018
  Cook Medical‘s: Hemospray has been approved by the FDA for performing hemostasis during endoscopic procedures within the GI tract.   It uses the firm’s unique inorganic powder as the active agent, which turns into a gel when it meets blood. The gel stays put and keeps the blood from passing through the treatment area.   Since heat is not used for administering t...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 06, 2018
About 10 million Americans suffer from a tremor disorder such as Parkinson's disease. Insightec is an Israeli company backed by the Koch brothers that has developed a focused ultrasound technology to treat tremors. The company is in Phase 3 trials with the FDA for its technology to treat Parkinson's disease. Roughly 10 million people in the United States suffer from some s...
Source: eus2018.org  Jul 06, 2018
The 21st International Symposium on Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS 2018) will be held in Bangkok, Thailand, on December 1 – 2, 2018. The intensive two-day EUS 2018 program will be comprised of several components including cutting-edge lectures, practical tutorials and round tables, live demonstrations of EUS procedure, leading experts who will present their findings in the field’s mos...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 05, 2018
French biotech Abivax’s might be on the verge of HIV cure and prevention discovery, after achieving a significant reduction of viral load patients during the first 28 days of treatment.   The company has announced results from the first group of patients in its most recent phase 2a trial testing the potential HIV cure treatment codenamed ABX464.   The study aimed at acc...
Source: SOAMVAC  Jul 02, 2018
Some post-surgical wounds, including following abdominal surgeries and mastectomies, may require suction drainage to prevent post operative complications due to edema and fluid collections. Suction bulbs have been common for the past few decades, since they don’t require external power and are very simple in design. New technologies can significantly improve this, as batteries have become mo...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 02, 2018
A novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method shows promise for noninvasively pinpointing sites of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), study is featured in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.   The U.S. Centers for Disease Contr...
Staff Writer, TMN  Jul 01, 2018
Researchers at the Kennedy Institute and Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, working with clinicians at NHS Lothian, have found that injection of the anti-TNF drug adalimumab into Dupuytren's disease nodules results in the reduction of the cell characteristics responsible for progression of Dupuytren's disease.   Based ...